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February 15, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPENS TOMORROW

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

a$ 4 r

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page three

ionesco
VICTIMS
OF DUTY

genet
THE
MAIDS

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, Feb. 16-19, 8 P.M.
-UNIVERSITY PLAYERS-
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY AT 12:30 P.M.

Ann Arbor, Michigan
ne ws,,,briefs
by The Associated Press
THE NATIONAL COMMISSION on Marijuana and Drug Abuse
is expected to report that an end to criminal penalties for the
possession of marijuana could reduce heroin addiction.
According to the New York Times, the commission will advocate
the decriminalization of the use of marijuana.
The full commission. report and recommendations will be sent to
Congress and Presitdent Nixon on March 22.
The report also found that five million Americans smoke marijuanaf
at least once a week and at least 500,000 use it at least every day.
* * *

I

Tuesday, February 15, 1972
Nxon wil1 take
-: acton to offset
}i using decissionsW
WASHINGTON (R) - President Nixon was quoted yesterday as
telling congressional sponsors of an anti-busing constitutional amend-
ment that he would take steps in the near future to offset recent
federal court decisions requiring extensive busing for school inte-
gration.
This was reported by Sen. Robert Griffin (R-Mich.) after he and
seven other members of Congress met with Nixon for nearly two hours
to explain their move to write a busing ban into the U.S. Constitution:
Griffin said Nixon, long a critic of forced busing, told the meeting
he had named a Cabinet committee to study the busing question and

Convivality, Intrigue,
Laughter, Drama
You'll find them all
AT THE
GRAD COFFEE
HOUR
ON
H o-
Wednesday,

A

B

SEN. ROBERT GRIFFIN (R-Mich) talks to reporters after meet-
ing with President Nixon to discuss the busing issue.
IOMBING CONTINUES:
s f
Britain investigaes
killings in Ire land

COLERAINE, Northern Ireland
W - Great Britain's Lord Chief
Justice, Sir John Widgery, yes-
terday opened a formal inquiry
into the Jan. 30 killing of 13
men in Londonderry, Northern
Ireland's second largest city.
Roman Catholic l e a d e r s,
among them priests and politic-
ians, have charged that the 13
men were killed in indiscrimin-
ate shooting by British troops
on a civil rights parade. T h e
British say the soldiers shot in
reply to sniping or nail bomb
attacks.
Lord Widgery told the opening
hearing he will be concerned
only to discover the facts of what
went on. His inquiry, he added.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104.Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univepi-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

will be limited in space, to the
Roman Catholic Bogside area
of Londonderry where the 13
died and in time from the be-
ginning of a riot which brought
troops into the area.
Meanwhile in Belfast, guerrilla
bombers blasted more buildings
causing damage but no casual-
ties.
Bombs wrecked a Belfast bank,
two downtown stores, a timber
yard and' Northern Ireland head-
quaiters of Rank-Xerox, a Brit-
ish subsidiary of American Xer-
ox.
In Newry, close to the border
with Ireland, gunmen broke into
a Burmah Oil Co. depot and
blew up tanks containing m o r e
than 100,000 gallons of oil and
gasoline. Firemen prevented the
blaze from spreading to other
tanks.
Authorities blamed the raids
on the outlawed Irish Republi-
can Army, which is fighting to
break Northern Ireland's links
with Britain and merge t h e
province with Ireland.

deliver a report upon his return
from People's Republic of China
late this month.
"It was very clear, from the
meeting today that the President
is going to do something about it
in the near future," Griffin told
newsmen who encircled him on the
White House driveway.
"The President made it clear
he's not going to be satisfied with
the status quo," Griffin added.
But he said Nixon did not indicate
a preference for the three ap-
proaches. discussed during the
meeting - intervention by the at-
torney general in more court cas-
es, legislative action, or a con-
stitutional amendment.
"All three could go forward at
the same time," Griffin said. And,
he added, "the President does not
feel he is limited to those three."
Griffin said the three members
of the Cabinet level committee -
Atty. Gen. John Mitchell, Secretary
Elliot Richardson of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare Director George
Shultz of the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget - sat in on to-
day's meeting in the Cabinet room.
The drive for the constitutional
amendment has been spearheaded
by National Action Group which
has its headquarters in Pontiac.
Irene McCabe, the group's lead-
er, has announced plans for a
march on Washington in support
of an anti-busing amendment.
Earlier in the day, Vice-Presi-
dent Spiro Agnew said that he is
opposed to busing to achieve rac-
ial balance in schools but is also
opposed to a constitutional amend-
ment to prohibit busing.
Agnew said he was expressing
his own views on the amendment
and not necessarily those of Pres-
ident Nixon.

Trade policy.:
With China to
be liberalized
WASHINGTON P) - President
Nixon announced yesterday further
steps to relax trade barriers with
the People's Republic of China,
placing it on an equal trade foot-
ing with the Soviet Union.
The announcement by White
House spokesmen came three days
beforehNixon departs for a his-
toric China visit.
"We hope the People's Republic
of China will be receptive to this
step to open up communications
with them," press secretary Ron-
aId Ziegler said.
Ziegler said the series of actions
will allow the export to the Peo-
ple's Republic of China of such
items as locomotives, construction
equipment, a variety of industrial
chemicals, internal combustion en-
gines and rolling mills.
The presidential decisions, which
follow by seven months a signifi-
cant loosening of trade restrictions
last June, are part of Nixon's "ef-
fort to establish a broader rela-
tionship" with the country of 800
Million people which ie will visit
Feb. 21-28, Ziegler said.
Nixon's actions basically invol-
ved shifting the People's Republic
of China from a list of countries
to which virtually all U.S. ex-
ports are banned to another trade
list which includes the Soviet Un-
ion and other countries in Eastern
Europe such as Albania and East
Germany.

'afl1

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
Wednesday, Feb. 16,
SPECIAL NOON LUNCHEON 35c
MUKI. TSUR, Israeli Educator:
"SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS
OF KIBBUTZ LIFE"

U

I

I

I l

THE KIBBUTZ
Film: "To Choose Another Path"
(Completed only a few weeks ago, this is the
most recent film about life on a kibbutz.) with:
DISCUSSION: "Education and
Integration on the Kibbutz:
Implications for America"
PROF. RAYMOND ELLIOTT, Special Education
PROF. JOHN P. FRENCH, Psychology, ISR
MR. MUKI TSUR, Israeli Author and Kibbutz Member
DR. SIMON WITTES, Social Work, Educational
Change Team
SCHORLING AUDITORIUM
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
WED., FEB. 16, 3-5 P.M.



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