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February 13, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPENS WEDNESDAY

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

jonesco
VICTIMS
OF DUTY

genet
THE
MAIDS

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Ann Arbor, Michigan Sunday, February 13, 1972

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, Feb. 16-19, 8 P.M.
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS-
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY AT 12:30 P.M.
FIND OUT YOURSELF
WHY EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT-

newsbrief
by The Associated Press
EGYPTIAN DIPLOMATS IN WASHINGTON hinted that face-
to-face negotiations with Israel "would not be impossible" if
Israel makes a clear withdrawal commitment.
The diplomats said that President Anwar Sadat might drop his
insistence on crossing the Suez Canal if the Israelis make a "clear
commitment" to withdraw to prewar borders within six months.
Egypt is prepared to accept an international force in the peninsula,
according to the diplomats.
The diplomats were careful while speaking about the U.S. pro-
posal for opening the Suez Canal, stating that the Suez proposal is one
element of the package and cannot be dealt with in isolation.
Israel, who has accepted the U.S. proposal, maintains that a Suez
settlement must be independent of an over-all peace settlement.
* * *
THE COST OF LIVING COUNCIL may recommend that im-
portation of foreign meat be stepped up to dampen a sharp rise
in domestic meat prices, Executive Director Donald Rumsfield
says.
Recent sharp rises in meat prices have produced calls by some
members of . Congress for price ceilings and an easing of import
quotas.j
However, Rumsfield declined to say whether the council might
consider imposing price controls on meat, saying an easing of meat
import quotas is "among the more likely possibilities."
This possibly has been strongly opposed by meat producing groups
and Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz.
* * *

N. Ireland tense

as

plans continue

for new march
BELFAST, Northern Ireland (A)-An uneasy lull hung over North-
ern Ireland yesterday as civil rights champions prepared for another
confrontation with police and British soldiers.
The quiet was marred, however, by a clash of the violence which
still has this British-ruled province in its grip and which has exacted a
toll of 243 dead since 1969.
The illegal civil rights march, which is expected to draw a crowd
of 5,000, is scheduled for Ennis-t

...__ '. i

4 O

FIFTH PrUM
FIFTN4 AVENUE AT LIBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 76.8700

SAT. & SUN.
5:30-7-8 :30-1 0
Weekdays 7-8:30-10

r
1
, _

-Associated Press
TWO MORE Democratic candidates for the presidentialnomina-
tion meet in New Hampshire, Senator George McGovern (D-S.D.),
right and Los Angeles Mayor Sam Yorty, left.
Wallace seeks Dem.
bid, Mills undecided

li l

PILOT PROGRAM presents
THE PRIME OF
MISS JEAN BRODIE
TODAY
:30 P.M. Public Health Aud.
ADMISSION 75c

c
c
I
i
'!

1&9

THE U.N. FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION
(FAO) warns that a future water shortage will be "the most
important limiting factor in the development of human society".
To avoid water shortages that would mean the difference between
life and death to persons, animals and plants, the U.N. body submitted
a series of suggestions, including a revolutionary proposal to relocate!
the world's entire population.
The study has blamed extensive urbanization for putting a heavy
demand on water and spoiling it. Desalination of sea water Vwas not
considered economical by the study.'
The paper also assailed the indiscriminate use of herbicides and!
insecticides for the abuse of land. The report cited the "large scale"
use of chemicals in southwestern United States as "unfavorable for'
man."
A NEW YORK state Supreme Court justice yesterday enjoined
Time magazine from publishing excerpts from the purported
Howard Hughes autobiography it has termed a hoax.
Judge Gerald Culkin said the material "is not their property, is;
not yet general news, is violative of their own agreement not to publish
any portion of the manuscript until the matter is finally determined,
and then only on application to the court."
The magazine said it would appeal the ruling, which came in a:
suit filed by McGraw-Hill and Rosemont Enterprises, a Hughes com-I
pany in Nevada which claims exclusive rights to his life story.
* * * *

-

IT'S SO FANTASTIC
YOU FIND YOURSELF
FEELING SORRY
FOR EVEN
HE BAD GUYS

DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
1, 3, 5,7,9 P.M.

By The Associated Press.
Sources close to Gov. George
Wallace say he is going f o r
broke in his campaign for the
Democratic presidential nom-
ination and for the moment any-
way, apparently has no plans for
another third party race.
"We're going 100 per cent, all
the way, full force," one spokes-
man said. "We're going after
the nomination and we'll be in
every primary from now on.
"We think that's the b e s t
route to put George Wallace in
the White House or at least in-
fluence the outcome of the elec-
tion."
However, he added, if dele-
gates pledged to Wallace are
challenged at the Democratic
convention, "It may be another
story."
The source said in an inter-
view last week the Alabama
governor has acquired ballot
positions in Florida - where
polls show him as the Democra-
tic leader, Massachusetts, West
Virginia, Pennsylvania, W is-
consin, Rhode Island, Nebraska
and Maryland.
Efforts are under way to enter

Wallace in primaries in o t h e r
states to try to win delegates
to the Democratic National Con-
vention at Miami Beach, Fla.
Meanwhile, Rep. Wilbur Mills
(D-Ark) has refused to confirm
or deny that he too is a contend-
er for the Democratic presiden-
tial nomination.
"My position is the same as it
was all last fall," Mills said. He
said his name will be placed in
nomination at the Miami Beach
convention by the Arkansas dele-
gation and "if I should be 'om-
inated I would accept it."

killen, a quiet southwest country
town of 5,000 inhabitants evenly
! splitamong Roman Catholics and
Protestants.
Large detachments of British
troops and Northern Ireland police
were reported moving into t h e
town.
March organizers aimed to re-
peat last Sunday's march in New-
ry which passed off peacefully un-
der the cautious guns of British
soldiers.
Two weeks ago, another c i v i 1
rights march in Londonderry erup-
ted into "Bloody Sunday." Thir-
teen civilians were shot dead when
paratroopers dispersed the crowds.
"We will undoubtedly try to
stop them if they enter the town,"
an army spokesman said. "But,
hopefully, there will be no con-
frontation."
Bernadette Devlin, a member of
the British Parliament, will ad-
dress the marchers. She also was
present at the Newry and London-
derry marches, staged to protest
internment without trial for su-
spected terrorists.

welfare plan
reconsidered
WASHINGTON () - The Sen-
ate Finance Committee is calling
on Nixon administration officials
to help it determine whether there
is a better way to end poverty
than through the President's wel-
fare-reform plan.
Chairman Russell Long (D-La.)
and Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D-
Conn.) were the prime movers in
setting up a hearing Tuesday at
which the alternatives will be ex-
plored.
Ribicoff says a detailed study
has uncovered 168 programs which
are designed to help the poor. But
he insists that testimony before
the committee on the Nixon wel-
fare plan shows that many of the
programs are failures.
According to Ribicoff, the mon-
ey saved by dropping low-priority
programs could be distributed to
the poor, ending poverty in one
stroke.

BLACKOUTS WORSEN
Miners' strike upsets Britain

TOM LAUGHLIN DELORES TAYLOR :
.. HE'LL MAKE YOU ANGRY... EVEN MAKE YOU
FURIOUS... OR, IF YOU'RE A WOMAN-BREAK
YOUR HEART ... ABOVE ALL THERE'S HOPE'!

CARTOONIST Al Capp has pleaded guilty to one of three
morals charges resulting from accusations made by a University
of Wisconsin student last spring.
County Dist. Atty.. Lawrence Durning told the court there had
been an agreement between the state and Capp's attorneys for Capp
to plead guilty tot attempted adultery and the state to seek dismissal
of the other charges of sodomy and indecent exposure.
Capp was fined $500 and court costs.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday,
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates' $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

LONDON (R) - Darkened and semiparalyzed by
striking coal miners, Britain faces its gravest in-
dustrial and political crisis since the nation's
only general strike 46 years ago.
The emergency that has disrupted electric pow-
er supplies also threatens the jobs of millions
and the recovery of the long-ailing economy.
A failure or refusal of the government to pro-
mote a swift settlement could imperil P r i m e
Minister Edward Heath's 20-month-old administra-
tion.
This is because a central aim of the Conserva-
tive leader's policy isto control wage levels in
all state-owned industries, including the c o a 1
mines.
As a consequence, the government delayed inter-
vention in the three-week dispute until late last
week, when positions had hardened. Its authoriza-
tion of a new offer was rejected by the 280,000

militant miners as too little, too late.
With electricity plants starved of coal' fuel be-
cause of the strike, households prepared to face
the worst blackouts since World War II.
Many husbands gave up the weekend to work
extra hours to make up for short shifts going into
effect Monday. Under an emergency order cut-
ting power to factories, thousands of plants will
be in operation only four days a week.
Some factories planned lengthened shifts for
these days to try to make up for lost production.
But others laid off workers indefinitely.
Housewives hit by the rotating blackouts' at
mealtime prepared lunch earlier orblater than
usual. Schoolchildren did their weekend homework
by candlelight.
Even with an early settlement, the power cuts
are expected to last for weeks until coal produc-
tion and distribution can resume.

I1

Aud. A, Angell Hall-75c
This Friday, Saturday & Sunday:
FELLINUS 81/ (1963)
This is his most impressive synthesis of romantic power,
personal vision, and cinematic control. Marcello Mastroi-
anni plays a film director searching for his next project,
his memory flooded with images and events out of his life.
"HIS GREATEST FILM"-Geo. Mast, History of the Movies
7:00 & 9:30 each night-3 nights, 6 shows

Many people believe that
drugs offer an opportunity for
greater self understanding; for
others, drugs bring conflict and
pain. Student Services Counsel-
ing Office and the Mental
Health Clinic are forming a
group where people can talk
about their drug experiences,
share anxieties and concerns,
and work toward some realistic
understanding of both the po-
tential benefits and potential
harm that can come from drug
use.
If you are interested in
joining such a group please
contact Tom Greenfield or
Marjorie Schuman at 764-

I

NEXT WEEKEND!
FRI.-SAT.-WARHOL'S TRASH
SUN.-CHABROL'S LA FEMME INFIDELE

UAC-DAYSTAR Presents with ICC and Vietnam Vets Against the War
BILLY PRESTON, IRIS BELL
AND
Delaney, Bonnie & Friends

B LLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBA LL
UNION
Benefit!
Tomorrow night only
we will present
THE MARX
BROTHERS
in
ANIMAL
CRACKERS
Dir. V. Heerman, 1930
A benefit showing for
pirgim
only 75c
. AT 7 & 9 P.M
in
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

8 P.M.-HILL AUD.
THIS SAT. NIGHT, FEB. 19
$4.50-3.50-2.00 gen. adm.
"Listening to Billy Preston, you
really can believe once more in
the saving powers of music."
-Rolling Stone
You've heard Billy Preston on the

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