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February 12, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-12

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAIL)

Saturdoyi February 12,,'l 972

THE MICHIGAN DAIL\ Saturday, February 12, 1972

W99A9 MATMEN CAUTIOUS:
I tdiw Sh~ta te aj
Summer Sublet Supplement
By ROGER ROSSITER
SMay Not Help. You Find= True
May ot H lp ou F d Tre An air of great caution can be
detected in the voice of Michigan
.- State wrestling coach Grady Pen-
inger when discussing his team's
chances against rival Michigan in
their encounter tonight. One F
would be led to believe that Pen- F
inger's Spartans would be fight-
+ .. ' " ing for their lives to overturn the TI
.Wolverines. H(
4 But when the records are com- WI
pared and the match-ups evalu- SI
40 ated, Peninger's cautious ap- G3
-:. proach can only be interpreted as-
. - that taken by a man who knows kovich
-." he's on top and doesn't have to match,
blow his own horn for people to Winega
know it. Davids
Coming into the match with ed Iow
five returning Big Ten cham- Conr
pions and five undefeated wrest- Spartai
lers in Big Ten competition, taking
Michigan State would have to Tom NJ
- be considered the favorite for to- 142. A
night's match to be held in the Kent
-4 Michigan State intramural gym. only or
--"" At 118 lbs., the Spartans have taking
twotime Big Ten and national divisioi
SchampionGreg Johnson ready to mente
go against the Wolverines' top Mich
pYfreshman Jim Brown. Johnson his 5-
B But, t Will "H e/P Y has to be considered the favorite endar
Blwith his vast advantage in ex- much
' Sublet Your Apartment! perience and knowledge gained cords
from winning the national cham- been h
pionship two years running, in th
Michigan coach Rick Bay is not swing
ready to concede the 118 match lievesI
to the Spartans explaining that for a v

I - - - --- - --- -- - - I .1 ................ -- ---- ........... : I.- .1--

spears in tim ida ting

This Weekend in Sports
TODAY
ASKETBALL--Illinois, at Crisler Arena, 2:00 P.M.
RESHMAN BASKETBALL-Auburn Hills JC, at Crisler Arena,
11:45 A.M.
RACK-Michigan State Relays at East Lansing
OCKEY-at Michigan Tech
RESTLING-at Michigan State

WIMMING-at Indiana
YMNASTICS-at Ohio State
has lost only one Big Ten The 150
that being to Iowa's Russ gether twc
ardner, who also defeated ly the sa
when the Wolverines visit- Mark Mal
a last weekend. ry Hubbax
rad Calendar has given the year's 150
ns performance plus since Hubbard
over their 134 lb. spot from Tourname
filkovich who moved up to Hubbard
s a junior transfer from eventually
State, Calendar has lost ping outc
ne Big Ten bout along with wrestlers
first place in his weight lahoma's]
n at the Midland Tourna- bouts this
earlier in the season. State's
higan's Rick Neff will put sle with N
3 record up against Cal- Radmanl
in what could easily be a Jan San
closer match than the re- third in
would indicate. Neff has son. Thes
hot of late, winning twice teresting
.e Wolverines' westward Radmanr
last weekend, and Bay be- tire third
Neff has 'a definite chance tough one
ictory. Gerald
Milkovich, as mentioned Michigan
has moved up a weight to champion
ter winning two consecu- against ei
ig Ten championships and ger Ritzn
ng fifth in the nation his record thi
an year at 134 lbs. Tom. petition.1
der brother of 126 pounder favored.
ilkovich. was also undefeat- The 17'
the Midland Tournament of the le
ear. His opponent will be squads. Ei
an's Bill Schuck who will Wickard
e a heavy underdog to an position f
ent Bay calls "the best in Ryan orl
untry." the assig
NSISTENCY IS KEY:
Tumblers I
By DAN BORUS "armpit

0 lb. event will bring to-
o wrestlers of very near-
me capabilities, State's
ley and Michigan's Jer-
rd. Malley defeated last
lb. Big Ten champion
9-1 at the Midland
nt in a match that saw
sustain an injury that
y necessitated his drop-
of the tournament. Both
gained draws with Ok-
Dale Arneson in earlier
season.
Rick Radman will tus-
Mitch Mendrygay at 158.
has lot only to Iowa's
derson after finishing
the Big Ten last sea-
se two had a very in-
match last season when
rode Mendrygal the en-
period to eke out a
point triumph.
Malecek, the third of
-State's five returning
s, comes into his outing
ther John Ryan or Ro-
nan with an unmarked
us far in Big Ten com-
Malecek, too, is heavily
7 lb. class has been one
ast productive for both
ther Jeff Zindel or Scott
is expected to fill this
for the Spartans, while
Dave Curby will handle
nment for Michigan.

Dave Ciolek will put. his un-
blemished Big Ten record on the
line against Michigan's Lon Har-
ris at 190. Ciolek was a Big Ten
champion last season along with
being the ;fifth place finisher na-
tionally.
Michigan upstart Gary Ernst
will get his sternest test of the
season when he takes on State's
fifth Big Ten champion, heavy-
weight Ben Lewis. Lewis, who
finished fourth nationally last
season, is expected to keep his
Big Ten slate clean at Ernst's ex-
pense.
Although Bay never plans on
losing a meet he admits that this
will be "an awfully tough meet,"
against the team he believes to be
the "best dual meet team in the
country." Despite the fact that
Michigan State is "only rated
number two behind Iowa State,"
Bay believes "they are the best
balanced team in the country."
Grady Peninger may only be
willing to say that the match
will be 'a "barnburner" and a
"good spectator's show," but it is
hard to believe that his team will
do anything but win when they
host Michigan tonight.

-Associated-?ress
Women s lib?
USING A LITTLE BODY ENGLISH, Kathy Leonard, 29, a teacher
and the first member of her sex to become an official in Minnesota,
calls a foul in a recent Minnesota State High School League game.
Miss Leonard says heckling of her calls doesn't bother her and it
is getting less frequent.

Gophers request reinstatement
of suspended Taylor, IBehagen

Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558

should Brown wrestle his best
match of the season he could
very well upset highly touted
Johnson.
The 126 lb. clash could easily be
the most exciting of the evening
with Spartan freshman Pat Mil-
kovich e n g a g i n g in combat
against the Wolverines' most vic-
torious wrestler, Bill Davids. Mil-

r

''

1. .
tV

MOHE DAYAI
Defense Minister of Israel
ON
"Face the Nation" CBS (Channel 2) 12 noon
. ALSO
(Channel 11) 11:30 a.m. Sun., Feb. 13th

I
M

Tom
earlier,
142 af
tive B9
finishi3
freshm
the olc
Pat Mi
ed in
this y
Michig
also b
oppone
the coi
COT

MINNEAPOLIS (P) - Attor-
neys for Minnesota Gopher bas-
ketball players Ron Behagen and
Corky Taylor asked U.S. District
Court Friday for a temporary re-
straining order against their sus-
pension by the Big Ten.
Judge Earl Larson conducted a
two-hour hearing, and said he

would announce his decision late
today.
Frank Brixius, a former Gopher
football player representing Be-
hagen, and Ron Simon, repre-
senting Taylor, urged that the Big
Ten accede to a decision by uni-
versity regents asking Commis-
sioner Wayne Duke to life the
suspension pending an inquiry in-
to the Jan. 25 brawl with Ohio
State.
Byron Gregory of Chicago rep-
resented the Big Ten office in the
hearing.
There was no immediate word'
from the Big Ten office on the
action that asked Duke to con-
vene an immediate inquiry into
the suspensions and subsequent
publicity.
University of Minnesota regents
voted to support the university's
Twin Cities Assembly Committee
on Intercollegiate A t h I e tic s,
which urged reinstatement of the
players on grounds their rights
were not properly safeguarded

face timid OSU

during the committee's investiga-
tion and there had been "undue
harrassment and character vili-
fication."
A statement by the university's
governing board said the regents
regret "deeply that the events of
Jan. 25 occurred. That the long-
standing tradition of friendly
competition between sister insti-
tutions of the Western Conference
should be marred by this event is
a source of great concern to us."
Stanley Wenberg, University of
Minnesota vice president in
charge of student affairs, said
there was "no precedent for a
full-season suspension."
He said that penalties in other
sports where rules are spelled out,
"normally run one to two games
. In light of this, the commit-
tee and I feel that three games
were enough."
The assemblyy committee of
faculty, students and alumni has
been conducting an investigation
since the suspensions, and plans
to continue with its probe.

of the nation" is no

One Michigan team that has
not fallen prey to the Columbus
jinx is the gymnastics team.
While their compatriots in other
athletic endeavors have had a
hard go of winning in the Ohio
metropolis, the tumblers h a v e
swept their series with t h e i r
OSU counterparts.

exception. The gymnasts, fresh
from the stunning victory over
Minnesota a week ago, view this
contest as a chance to hone up
their collective skills in prepara-
tion for the Big Ten champion-
ships, acclimating themselves
to full routines, foreign appara-
tus .and. arena.

. :

--Israel Students Assoc.

a

that their record is ten wins
and two losses.
Despite the fact that their team
is not on the level of an Iowa
or a Michigan, the Buckeyes
do have some fine individual
performers. Reed Klein in the
all-around usually scores around
50 points as does his tumbling
mate Bill Hammond.
Michigan, on the other hand,
registered its best personal per-
formances last week against
Minnesota. Kaziny's 9.4 in the
side horse, Falb's 9.4 in the still
rings, Gura's 9.3 in vaulting and
Marti's superlative and beautiful
9.55 in the high bar competition
represent "year's best" f o r
these men.
A glance at Coach N e w t
Loken's chart on the practice
room wall reveals that the team,
despite the Iowa setback, h a s
gradually brought up its scores
throughout the season a n d
should continue to refine r o u-
tines and raise scores. The full
contingent, which is travelling
down Route 23 to Columbus, ran
through a practice compulsory
meet with Coach Newt Loken
viewing on video-tape and some
rather harsh judging and came
up with a score exceeding 160
Commenting on his squad's
chances for another Big T e n
championship Loken pointed out
that his boys were aware of the
challenge and are using every
opportunity, including this meet,
to improve scores and that he
foresaw a battle with Iowa for
the championship. And that bat-
tle is something that the Wol-
verines will not go into unprepar-
ed.

Gordon grabbed on tax fraud;
Aspiri Ki11s British boxer
By The Associated Press
* CHICAGO-Criminal charges of filing late federal income
tax returns for the years 1967 through 1969 were lodged yesterday
against Dick Gordon, wide receiver for the Chicago Bears who played
out his option last season.
Michael P. Sievelis, assistant U.S. District attorney; said Gordon
filed his return for 1967 in April, 1971, and the returns for' 1968 and
1968 in October, 1971.
If convicted, Gordon would face a maximum sentence of one
year in prison and a $10,000 fine on each count.
* * *
BRADFORD, England - British boxer Mickey Pinkney took
aspirin before a fight in which he collapsed and died, an inquest was
told yesterday.
Consultant pathologist Dr. Ivan Horsfield said an analyst's
report on Pinkney showed traces of aspirin. "No athlete should take
any drugs, even of the simplest kind, except under medical supervi-
sion," Dr. Horsfield warned.
Horsfield said Pinkney died from a sudden hemorrhage into' his
lungs that obstructed breathing.
"Aspirin can cause an increased tendency to bleed in some peo-
ple," Dr. Horsfieldl said. "Usually an ordinary dose, such as two
tablets, would have little or no effect in this respect. But there are
few apparently normal people in whom this light dosage will cause
a marked increase in the bleeding time."
*-OAKLAND - Philadelphia Flyers goalie Bruce Gamble was re-
ported in stable condition yesterday, recuperating from a heart at-
tack, but his doctor said he's out for the rest of the National Hockey
League season.
Gamble,33, has been in the coronary care unit at Merritt Hos-
pital since suffering the attack Wednesday.
ZHDANOV, USSR - Bobby Lee Hunter, a convict ffrom Co-
lumbia, S.C., Marvin Johnson and Duane Bobick led the U.S. boxing
team to a 3-3 tie with Russia Friday, Tass, the Soviet news agency
reported.
Hunter outpointed Eduard Duzovski in a flyweight fight; John-
son, from Indianapolis, Ind., decisioned Anatoli Klimanov in a mid-
dleweight bout, and Bobick, from Bowlus, Minn., dominated Valeri
Inyatkin in a heavyweight three-rounder.
Appearing
Sunday Night
at the PRETZEL BELL
Buddies in the Saddle

$

0

N

Have you applied to live in one of
the ICC Co-ops next Fall?
Are you considering living in one?
Then be sure to come to the

CO-OP MASS MEETING
SUNDAY, FEB. 13,1:15 P.M.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
Learn about student-owned housing on campus. The
Central Campus Co-ops will hold open houses for all
those interested in visiting them after the Mass Meet-
ing.

V
*

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