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February 11, 1972 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Pace Ten

THE MICHIGAN DA1LY

Friday, February 1 1, 19 1/-

. _ Tn riayfe.uc _.. PI

'U' grad views Ireland

Mid-English dictionary~
half-way to completion

(Continued from Page 1)
suspected "subversives" can be
imprisoned without trial.
Cullen wants to organize a local
discussion group "to heighten
awareness of the historical as-
pects" of the Northern Ireland
conflict. He claims that most peo-
ple remain unaware of the long,
complex history of the present
conflict. He also hopes the dis-
cussion group will "talk of ways
out of the mess."
o"The dispute does not involve
only a handful of terrorists," Cul-
len charges. "The dispute is be-
tween the British and the ma-
jority of the Irish population.
This is a mass movement that
won't be put d'own through intim-
idation or paltry promises."
Discussing his own political
position, Cullen avoids political
labels but characterizes himself
as an undogmatic socialist. "I
don't like labels because they link

me with people I don't want to be
linked to.
"I don't follow any party line,"
he says "Socialism seems the best
way of getting a fair deal for
everyone. But I have no time
whatsoever for the socialism of
the Soviet Union or Red China."
Aside from politics, Cullen calls
his other major interest, acting,
the "introvert" side of himself.
After being an amateur actor for
several years, he joined a union
and turned professional, beconii-
ing fairly well known in Belfast
and Dublin. But acting drew him
away from his studies and poli-
tics, so he gave it up last year.
Currently, Cullen is also cir-
culating petitions to be sent to
both the United Nations calling
for their intervention and to the
British Consulate in Detroit de-
manding the eventual withdr'awal
of all troops.

Busing plan considered

(Continued from Page 1)
and manuscripts, as well as three
million cards filled with words
and- quotations.
Since 1952, the dictionary has
been published' in 128-page sec-
tioris which appear three or four
times a year. With work com-
pleted through the word "leten"-
meaning "to let" - none of the
editors would speculate when the
projected 10,000 page work would
be completed.
"Outsiders wonder why we don't
finish it up and just publish it
like common dictionaries," re-
marks English Prof. Sherman
Kuhn, the chief editor. "They
don't realize that we have no pre-
vious basis and that we're work-
ing .from scratch."
Peace moves
ruled out
(Continued from Page 1)
election would be held to choose
a new South Vietnamese president.
In addition, North Vietnam last
week asserted that American pris-
oners of war will only be released
when the U.S. government has
withdrawn its support from the
Thieu administration and when
American troops have withdrawn
from Southeast Asia.
In a major clarification of
Hanoi's position, Xuan Thuy, the
chief North Vietnamese negotiator
in Paris, made it clear that theI
settin 7 of a specific date by the

Working from scratch has in-
volved a long process of collect-
ing all surviving English works
from the years 1100 to 1475. All
the works - stored on numerous
book shelves around the office-
have been read through for un-
usual words, for ordinary words
used in special senses and for or-
dinary words in their common
usage. I
Words are then copied onto
slips of paper along with a quo-
tation and the source of the
quote. Romances, histories, sci-
entific treatsies, religious works,
wills and letters were among the
unestimated number of sources;
combed for words.
'.Sometimes the medical texts
are fascinating to read through,"
McKelvey notes. "Most of the re-
cipes for ailments are junk. But
occasionally you come across one
that works."
To construct each entry, the
accumulated slips-from three to
several hundred for each word-
are arranged in chronological or-
der of the quotations. The editor
working with the word reads
through the slips to get a feel for
the range of its Middle English
usage, and determines the mean-
ings from the quotes.

Black unit
endorsed
(Continued from Page 1)
A white Stockwell resident
called the charges "insulting" and
claimed white residents experi-
enced the same difficulties as
blacks.
Committee member Loren Bar-
ritt, an associate professor of ed-
ucation, commented "George Wal-
lace would have supported this,"
adding that he did not think the
plan would contribute to, solution
of racial problems.
Gill said, however, that blacks
did not want isolation from
whites, hence the request for sep-
arate housing within an inte-
grated dorm.
He said he hoped the plan
would "offset racial tensions", and
accused critics of failure to offer
a better solution.
Opponents in both dorms be-
lieve separate black housing
should'be instituted in separate
buildings, such as Betsy Barbour
or Helen Newberry.
The proposal for black housing
was first written by the Univer-
sity's Special Projects Office last
fall, following complaints by
black students.

CR EATIVE
SHABBAT
SERVICE
Every Friday--6 :15 p.m.
HILLEL-1429 Hill

'U' pharmacy
drugs stolen
Thieves broke into the Health
Service pharmacy early yester-
day morning, stealing a- quan-
tity of narcotics and ampheta-
nines, Health Service officials
said last night.
According to Health Service
'director Dr. Robert Anderson, the
robbery took place sometime after
3:30 a.m. yesterday. He said Ann
Arbor police detectives as well as
officers from the University De-
partment of Safety are investigat-
iog the incident.
Ann Arbor" police officials said
last night they could not com-
ment on the case.

(Continued from Page 1)
satisfactory racial balance in
Southeast School. Warner's, plan
also provided that the students
from south of the highway be
bused to Southeast, while the
students living north of the high-
way would be bused to Clinton
School.
When reminded that his plan
would, in fact, serve to make
Clinton School essentially all-
white, Warner replied that the
same situation exists in many

Ann Arbor schools.
Board member Henry Johnson
criticized Warner's plan as not
dealing with the problem. "The
real issue is whether we will
attempt to achieve a decent ra-
cial balance in the Clinton
School district," he said.
Acceptance of the plan was
urged by a number of groups
from the audience including the
Ann Arbor League of Women
Voters, and Concerned Parents
for Pairing.

4

'.:

I I

A career in law

t U U

without law school.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. .YY~f f. "^f..Y...Y:Ht Xf.".:11 f":fI:: t........ ."; " " "..,.. '. "; "."Y ."..."..".".".".'.": .r.": .":.f.:"'

i

FRIDA1, FEBRUARY 11
Day Calendar
Astronomy Colloquium: G. Riegler,
Bendix Aerospace Div., "Recent X-Ray
Observations," P&A Coloq. Rm, 4 pm.
UM Employees Credit Union: Annual
Meeting, Statler-Hilton, State Rd., 7:30
'pm.
Creative Arts Festival: Handkey's
"Kaspar" Residential Coll. Aud,, 8 pm.
International Folk Dance: Barbour
Gym, 8-11 pm.
Musical Society: Choral Union Series,
Alicia De Larrocha, pianist, Hill Aud.,
8:30 pm.
general NoticesI
Environmental Health Seminar: G.
Ball, "Mass Spectrometry in Environ-
mental Research," Sch. of Public H1th.
II Aud., Mon., Feb. 14, 1 pm.
Fellowship applications for the MAR-'
GARET KRAUS RAMSDELL AWARD
and WALLACE RADCLIFF AWARD are
now available for 1972-73; awards are
made to assist graduate student of The
U of M, male or female, who plaps to
enter the Christian Ministry or Re-
ligious Education. The awards may be
used for study In these fields at other

4

institutions; applications to Dean of
Graduate Sch. on forms avail. at
Graduate Fellowship Ofc., 1014 Rack-
ham; deadline is Mar. 1.
THE QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY, BEL-
FAST, IRELAND, offers exchange
scholarship for a U of M grad; will
provide fees, board and lodging for the
academic year 1972-73; study may be
carried on in any of the academic dis-
ciplines offered at the Queen's Uni-
versity; further information and ap-
plication forms available at the Grad-
uate Fellowship Ofc., Rm 1014, Rack-I
ham; deadline for receipt of applica-I
tions, Feb. 28.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.
Jobs in the A.A. area: for more info.
call our office, 764-7460.
Sales People-to sell home care pro-
ducts
Social Work Position to work with
emotionally disturbed children, A.A.,
MSW or M. in psych.
Training Counselor-for large Detroit
pest control company, B. in science, 1
some counseling exp.
Pt. Time Child Care Worker-houseR
father in Detroit Children's Home, 30
hrs. week
Engr. Secretary-typing dictaphone.
gen. office, A.A.
Pharmaceutical Sales Rep.-BS in
Biol., Bloomfield Hills

sLi g v a YVI
United States for the withdrawalE
of its forces would on longer be
sufficient to secure the prisoners'
freedom.
Thuy also stressed that Hanoij
would no longer consider separate- {
ly the military and political issues
in the Vietnam war-although it
had been prepared to do so lastl
summer.
Nixon has denounced the Com-
munist stance as being the equiva-
lent of a demand for a U.S. sur-
render in Southeast Asia.

Heavy Duty Steering
and SuspensionParts
" BALL JOINTS
" IDLER ARMS
" TIE ROD ENDS
L

When you become a Lawyer's; Assistant you'll
do work traditionally done by lovyers-work
which is challenging, responsible and Intellectu-
ally stimulating. Lawyer's Assistants are now so
critically needed that The Institute for Poralegal
Training can offer you a position in the city of
your choice-and a. higher startir.gsAolary than
you'd expect as a recent college graduate. Here
is a career as a professional with financial re-
wards that increase with your developing ex-
pertise.
If you are a student of high academic stand-
ing and are interested in a 'legal career, come
speak with our representative..
Contact the Placement Office.
A representative of The Institute
will visit your campus on:
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23.
NOTE: If the above date is inconvenient for you, please
col or write The institute for information.
The Institute for
Paralegal Trn ing
13th floor, 401 Walnut St., Philo., Pa. 19106
(215) WA 5-0905

Have you applied toilive in one of
the ICC Co-ops next Fall?
Are you considering living in one.?
Then be sure to come to the
CO-O AS ETN
SUNDAY, FEB. 13, 1:15 P.M.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
Learn about student-owned housing on campus. The
Central Campus Co-ops will hold open houses for all
those interested in visiting them after the Mass Meet-
ing.

WOMEN'S OPEN HOUSE

9

12 Houses on Central Campus
9 Houses Will Open on
North Campus in Sept. 1972

every other Friday starting Feb. 11, 3-6
p.mn. Drop by 332 Michigan Union and

1 i

have Coffee and meet other women.
Bring goodies if you want.

!

INTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
ROOM 3-N UNION
662-4414

= ""-, __ --]-- - -- - - - l

;

e .... ____ _..__ _,_ _

_ TI

-I

ON
SALE
AT

89

4

OVER 25,000 LPS

OVER. 300 LABELS IN STOCK
WATCH FOR SPECIAL SALE
ITEMS CHANGING WEEKLY

, Ii g, n~
Fit

iscount records

1235 S. UNIVERSITY .0. "0 S. STATE
668-9866 665-3679

0

ANN ARBOR,
MICH.

*

H OURS-

S. UNIV.-MON.-FRI., 10-10
fi C'T'ATV12 .A/X?'J UDi 9GAA-

11

Both Stores-

SAT. 9:30-6

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