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February 09, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-09

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Program Information 8-6416
IT'S SO FANTASTIC
YOU FIND YOURSELF
FEELING SORRY
FOR EVEN
THE BAD GUYS'

TODAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Oh where h av e you
been B I L L Y JACK,
BILLY JACK? Oh
where have you been
Charming Billy?

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Wednesday, February 9, 19 Ii

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, February 9, 1972

SEXISM & RACISM
LECTURE BY
Gloria Steinem
Editor, Ms. magazine
Margaret Sloan
Operation Breadbasket
MON., FEB. 14-8:30 P.M.
POWER CENTER
Tickets $1.50-on sale Feb. 8-14
Michigan Union, Fishbowl, at the door

nws brie fs
by The Associated Press
IMPORTANT NEGOTIATIONS, between Malta and a combined
delegation of Britain and NATO broke down yesterday.
The talks center on the future British naval bases on the island,
which is of great strategic value because of its location in the Eastern
Mediterranean. Western powers fear that a loss of British bases on
the island would lead to a growing Soviet influence in the area.
Maltese Prime Minister Mintoff has asked the British to leave the
island unless they increase the rent they are now paying to the
Maltee government. The two sides have not as yet been able to reach
agreement on the amount of money that should be payed.
* * *
JURY SELECTION was completed yesterday, in the conspiracy
trial of antiwar priest Philip Berrigan.
The group that was finally chosen after eleven days of delibera-
tion, is composed of, three men and nine women, including one black
and one Catholic. The remainder of the jury is made up of white
protestants who said they had no strong opinions on the war issue.
Berrigan and six others have been accused of plotting to kidnap
presidential aide Henry Kissinger as part of a larger plan to protestj
President Nixon's Indochina policies.
CHICAGO SEVEN ATTORNEYS argued in federal court yes-
terday, in an effort to overturn five riot convictions stemming from
violence at the 1968 Democratic Convention.
The lawyers argued that the antiriot section of the Civil Rights
Act of 1968 under which the defendants were indicated, violated their
clients' first amendment rights.
That provision which made it a crime to cross state lines to
incite a riot, was written into the Civil Rights Act, specifically to curb J
radical activity.
COMMERCE DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS announce yesterday
that the, textile industry suffered its worst year ever in 1971.
The industry had nearly two billion dollars in trade deficits .which
accounted for almost the entire amount the country lost as a whole.
The principal reason cited for the bad economic year was the large
increase in the import of manmade fiber textiles, particularly from
the Far East.
Recent agreements reached with several Asian countries should
limit their imports in the future and help restore a balance in trade
payments.
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS demonstrated yesterday in Tunis,
the capital city of the North African country of Tunisia.
The demonstration is the first one against President Habib Bour-
guiba in the fifteen years he has ruled the country.
The arrest of a Jewish woman charged with distributing sub-
versive material touched off the demonstration which quickly became
anti-government in nature. Government officials blame leftist agi-
tators for the trouble.
** *
SECRETARY OF THE NAVY John Chafee announced yester-
day that women will be welcome in the naval ROTC program, but
not at the naval academy at Annapolis.
Two women have already been appointed to the academy by
congressional sponsors, including one from the Ann Arbor area.
Her sponsor, Congressman Jack McDonald (R-Mich. , said he
would introduce legislation to correct the situation..

Nixon mLessa e
asks legislation
for environment
Bly The Associated Press
-President Nixon sent to Congress yesterday a series of proposals
aimed at curbing industrial pollution, including the first tax on pollut-
ers.
The tax, a levy on the sulfur emitted from smokestacks and
power plants, is designed to encourage industry to meet regional air-
quality standards that take effect in 1975.
The proposals in general recommend punitive action to deal with
industries that fail to comply with federal standards and this marks
a departure from past actions by the Nixon administration.
Until now, the administration T

-Associated Press
Ironic confrontation
Fancia Jordan, sister of Angela Davis, stands outside the Santa
Clara County Courthouse holding her daughter Angela, apparently
not recognizing the man who is'prosecuting her sister on charges
of murder, kidnap and conspiracy.
FREEDOMS RESTRICTED:
Bolivianciefsays
no to new elections

has been depending largely on vol-
untary compliance on the part of
the industry.
In line with this general policy,
Nixon proposed a measure encour-
aging states to take control of the
location of highways and airports
by 1975. Those which fail to ob-
tain federal approval of their plans
by then would start losing federal
highway and airport construction
aid.
Each year they delay, their fed-
eral aid in these areas -would be
reduced and wouldaberredistribut-
ed to states with approved plans.
Nixon also proposed to discour-
age the development of coastal
wetlands by removing the eligibil-
ity of projects located on wetlands
from certain tax benefits avail-
able to commercial construction.
Still another proposal w o u I d
make the harming of an endanger-
ed species of animal a federal of-
fense for the first time, subject
to criminal penalties.
In addition to the legislative pro-
posals, the Nixon mesage a n -
nounced a number of executive ac-
tions in the environmental field,
including:
-A complete ban on the use
of poisons to control predator ani-
mals on federal land, much of
which is used for the grazing of
cattle and sheep; and
-An order for development of
standards to protect farm workers
from pesticide poisoning.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students 'at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at -Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, ,420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,1
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail..
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Court delays.
school plan,
in Richmond
RICHMOND () - Plans for the
desegregation of schools in the
Richmond area may be delayed
by as much as a year, as a result
of a decision handed down yester-
day by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals.
The Court ordere the school
system to stop action on the de-
segregation proposal pending ap-
peal. School officials may develop
tentative plans for desegregation,
but no personnel may be hired to
implement the plan, until the court
reaches its decision.'
The appeal is aimed at a lower
court ruling which ordered t h e
consolidation of the predominant-
ly black inner city schools and the
white suburban schools.
This is the first major desegre-
gation ruling which has attempted
to merge city and suburban school
systems, and opponents of the plan
have pledged to take the, case to
the Supreme Court if necessary.
The Richmond decision could
have a great impact upon the na-
tional scene, as similarbdesegre-
gation plans are now being con-
sidered in other cities.
In a similar suit in Detroit, U.S.
District Judge Stephen Roth found
city, state and federal officials
guilty of creating de jure segre-
gation in the city. He ordered the
State Board of Education to devise
a new plan for the schools by Feb.
1.
Hearings on the Richmond ap-
peal have been set for the week
of April 10th.

LA PAZ, Bolivia OP) - Presi-
dent Hugo Banzer Suarez de-
clared yesterday that no elec-
tions will be held in Bolivia un-
til his military-civilian regime
has eradicated an "inheritance
of anarchy."
"When the country has b e e n
constitutionalized," the 45-year-
old army colonel said in an in-
terview, "The road toward elec-
tions will certainly be followed."
Banzer, whose National Popu-
lar Front toppled the leftist re-
gime of Gen. Juan Jose Torres
on Aug. 21, after several days
of bloody fighting, also said that
the nation's universities are to
remain closed for an indefinite
period.
The universities were centers
of leftist radical activity until
the Banzer regime closed them
shortly after taking power.

A La Paz newspaper yesterday
published a letter to Banzer from
224 prisoners who claim t h a t
they are being held without
charges. Banzer said their claims
to inocence are "a problem of
Bolivian political psychology. A
subversive never feels guilty and
invariably alleges innocence."
Banzer's rise to power caused
a stir in Washington circles when
it was revealed that he had re-
ceived military equipment and
training from the Defense De-
partment's Military Assistance
Program.
In addition, several U.S. Army
officers are said to have taken
an active role in the actual plan-
ning of the Banzer coup. Penta-
gon officials, however, have de-
nied these charges.
Banzer's government is Boliv-
ia's 187th in 145 years.

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 9:00 P.M.

w
.I

________HI-Fl
BUYS
Don't miss the HI-FI BUYS

4

Miss J rounds up
the new blue denims
in knit separates by
Pant-Her with way-out
western style. The
cotton/polyester blend is
the going thing with light
blue trim and print
shirts. Sizes 5-13.
A. Snapped jumpshort, $18.
B. Smock jacket, $20.
Shirt, navy/white knit.
S-M-L. $14. Pant, $17.
C. Turtle-print knit shirt,
red/navy. S-M-L. $13.
Jean skirt, $13.
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HOUSE

To celebrate the redecoration of our stereo demonstration facilities
we've scheduled some very special activities all next week. Plan to attend
these exclusive events .. .

FREE
MONDAY, FEB. 14
FREE
TUESDAY, FEB. 15
FREE

KLH COMPACT CLINIC-Bring in your KLH model 11, 11W, 15,
20, 24, or 26 regardless of when or where you purchased it,
and we'll test it, making minor repairs on the turntable free!
SPECIAL SPEAKER COMPARISON-At 4 times throughout the day
we will objectively compare the nation's current 4 best selling
speakers . . . the AR-4X, KLH 17, Dynaco A-25, and Small
Advent. Your one chance to hear them under one roof!
MICROPHONE SEMINAR-come in and learn the basics of
microphone selection for YOUR needs . . . and see the unveiling
of the new condenser microphones by an Electro-Voice factory

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16 representative!
LIVE VS. RECORDED DEMONSTRATION-Hear a group of musi-
cians "live" .. and then close your eyes as you listen to perfect
reproduction on home type stereo components. Call Ray at 769-
THURSDAY, FEB. 17 4700 to reserve a seat!

FREE

COMPUTERIZED DEMONSTRATIONS OF BOSE 901's-We've pre-
pared a special demonstration explaining design principles and
concepts behind the Bose 901 loudspeaker . . . the most highly

FRIDAY, FEB. 18 reviewed speaker regardless of size or price!
CALL 769-4700 OR KEEP WATCHING THE MICHIGAN DAILY FOR MORE DETAILS.

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