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February 08, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAM'

Tuesday, February 8, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Varied course offerings greet
new Free University registrants

By MARTY STERN
Registration begins today for
Free University, a program offer-
ing 35 varied courses free of charge
to all interested persons.
The goal of Free University, as
stated in the catalog, is "to bring
education back to the founda-
tions.
"We want people to take courses
because they have a sincere in-
terest in learning about the sub-
jects that they turn their atten-
tion to. To learn truly is to grow
in all ways, to bloom spiritually, in
truth and wisdom and knowledge."
the catalog continues.
Chief coordinator Linda Lesher
explains, "The classes aren't struc-
tured. The teacher and students
decide all details on how the class
will be run. Courses are all volun-

teer, no credit is given, and no
grade is given, either. Thus there
is no pressure on the student.'
The 35 courses being offered will
cover a wide range of crafts and
discussion topics. Examples of
some classes being taught are fig-
ure drawing, hand sewing, uphol-
stering, and Ukranian embroider-
ing. Discussion groups will include
China, science fiction, modern
concepts of God, and "soul trav-
el."
Lesher says classes are designed
for individual interests or, as a
knowledge supplement. Classes, she
adds, should allow a free exchange
of ideas and knowledge between
class members.
A free catalog listing all of the
classes is available in the office of
the University Activities Center.
which sponsors the Free Univer-

sity. Catalogs will also be passed
out during registration in the
Fishbowl. Registration will be held
f rnm - to 5 ..5nd 7 to 9 nm and !

1
J

Day of disruption'
set for N.- Ire land

(Continued from Page 1)
after a civil rights march on Jan.]
30.
The opposition politicians, meet-
ing in their "alternative assem-
bly" in Dungannon, said they
would prepare contingency plans
against prospective jailing of pro-
minent members. Illegal march-
ing carries a mandatory penalty
of six months jail, although the
sentence can be suspended at the
magistrate's discretion. The hear-
ings are set for Newry on Feb. 16.
The rebel assembly was set up
last year after members of the
Catholic-based opposition called a
boycott of the Northern Ireland
Parliament, which now is an all-
Protestant assembly.
The oppositionists say they will
not return to parliament or to
other talks with British and pro-
vincial leaders until the govern-
ment stops jailing IRA suspects

without a trial.
This- attitude so far has frus-
trated British moves toward some
sort of political initiative intend-
ed to bring the Catholic minority
back into the parliamentary sys-
tem and wean it away from sup-
port for the IRA.
According to politicians in Lon-
don, this initiative might include
some form of community govern-
ment giving Catholics a guaran-
teed role on the decision - making
process.
But Northern Ireland govern-
ment sources cautioned against
expecting any dramatic moves or
drastic alteration in the pro-
vince's parliamentary system.
As they saw it, London still is
far from concrete decisions and
talk of ceding border areas with
heavy Catholic majorities to the
Irish republic was dismissed as
nonsense.

will continue through Thursday.
PIRGIM
starts
drive
(Continued from Page 1)
At a PIRGIM organizational
meeting last Friday, Joe Heiland,
one of Ralph Nader's Washington
staff members, said a strong com-
mitment was necessary if PIRGIM
was to make any progrgess.
"This group will never get off
the ground if all of the students
are not willing to make the nec-
essary time commitment," Heiland
said.
Raeiland also talked about the
year-old Minnesota PIRG, saying
that one of the group's main prob-
lems was the lack of real com-
mitment by students.
He added that the same students
who were in Washington during
the 1969 demonstration, protesting
the war with such energy, showed
only a half-hearted interest when
the Minnesota PIRG investigated
the abuses of the state's grand
jury.
The Minnesota group, however,
has had some notable achieve-
ments, including helping to en-
force the price freeze by checking
retail prices in Minneapolis super-
markets, and demanding an end to
timber cutting in an area of Min-
nesota until present environmental
impact research is published.
Heiland stressed his belief that
the people of this country have to
get back the power they have
given up. He said the only way to
get this power is to have influence,
and that groups staffed with law-
yers, research scientists and other
professionals, as PIRGIM plans to
be, will do just that.
Although the group has not yet
obtained definite commitments by
professionals, specialists from De-
troit, Lansing and Ann Arbor have
expressed interest, along with sev-
eral Michigan consumer groups.
The University is the first school
to take any definite action for for-
mation of the group.
Student organizations at the
University endorsing the formation
of the group include Student Gov-
ernment Council, LSA student
government, Residential College
the Councils of Mosher - Jordan.
Couzens, and Alice Lloyd Halls,
Architecture Student Faculty Gov-
ernment, Nursing Council, Thea
Sigma Phi, ENACT, Law Student
Senate, Tau Kappa Epsilan and
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
* I

Officers
deny Tet
offensive
(Continued from Page 1)
ing an American helicopter base
in Pleiku, describing the intruders
as having satchel charges strap-
ped to their naked bodies. The
"sappers" turned out to be a dog
that had tripped a flare in the
perimeter wire.
There also have been reports of
refugees fleeing Kontum City and
that Air Vietnam canceled all
flights to the province capital. But
Air Vietnam is still flying to Kon-
tum, with flights fully booked
through Feb. 26.
"More people are arriving in
Kontum than leaving," said one
American there. "A lot of our sol-
diers aren't getting leaves for Tet
this year and their families are
coming in to visit them instead of
the other way around."
A headquarters order that all
military personnel in Pleiku must
wear helmets and carry arms got
attention, but in fact the security
condition remained white, the low-
est state of alert.
Some cynics in the field accuse
Washington of waging a "proga-
ganda offensive."
"Maybe they're doing it to make
the Vietnamese look good," specu-
lated one field officer. "You know,
something like: 'The situation is
very bad, fellows, but the Vietna-
mese are holding their own. See,
Vietnamization works.'
"Besides, it's always better to
be wrong saying there will be an
offensive than be wrong saying
there won't."

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY City Council candidates strike a "ripped" pose at party headquarters last
night. From left, candidates are: Genie Plamondon, David Black, Nancy Wechsler, Jerry De Grieck,
and Nancy Burghardt.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daly

HRP selects
5 candidates
(Continued from Page 1)
the first time in Ann Arbor.
The First and Second Wards,
with apparently the greatest num-
ber of students of any ward in
Ann Arbor, may see HRP victor-
ies in April.
Second Ward candidate De
Grieck said, "We will win because
of the kind of platform we have
and the kind of campaign we will
run."
Third Ward candidate Wechsler
agreed, saying she has a "good
chance of winning."
Read Daily
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-0

JOIN WOMEN ACROSS
THE COUNTRY
ATTEND THE WOMEN'S
NAT'L ABORTION
ACTION CONFERENCE
FEB. 11, 12, 13
at Boston University
for transportation
call: .Joyce Broughton, 971 -603 1

I

SACUA acts on faculty
bargaining proposal

U of M Students,

(Continued from Page 1)
administration.
Such a proposal falls short of the
unionization efforts of Wayne State
University and Eastern Michigan
University. The Michigan Employ-
ment Relations Commission ruled
Friday that the faculty at each
school may vote on a choice of a
bargaining unit or no union at all.
In addition,hSACUA asked yes-
terday that the Reed Committee
answer several questions that arose
during' the meeting.
Specifically, SACUA asked the
committee to clarify the source of
funding for the negotiating process.

The report calls for a, full-time
consultative negotiating team, but
does not specify how funds for the
negotiators will be obtained.
It is also unclear with whom the
negotiating team will discuss eco-
nomic issues. Since the State Legis-
lature is responsible for University
funds, the real negotiating would
normally be with that body. How-
ever, the report makesno refer-
ence to this.
SACUA requested that these
points be clarified when it rakes
the report to the full assembly two
weeks from now.

Faculty and Staff
WINTER: LOVE IT
or LEAVE IT
BAHAMAS--
Freeport
8 DAYS/7 NIGHTS
March 5 to 12
$159.00

I

People's Bicentennial
puts rev in revolution

For the student body:
FLARES
by
SLevi
Farah
Wright
aLee
y~Male

I

(Continued from Page 1)
The carnival flavor is to be play-
ed down, and pride, patriotism,
education, and *redevelopment to
be played up, according to the
government's commission.
The four years leading up to
'76 will stress such events as the
publishing of n e w historical
books, unriior high school life and
drum corps competitions, and a
special '75 n a t i o n a 1 census,
among others. -
In keeping with its pledge to
make "a revolution in fact"
rather than one "in rhetoric,"
the People's Commission head-
quarters in Washington wants to
serve only as a strating point
and clearing house for local and
regional oicentennial commis-
sions. So rar,a few are beginning
to form in local communities,
mostly on college campuses.
Up to this point, the commis-
sion has established a national
feature service, which provides
articles on American radical his-
tory and ideas for reform to in-
terested groups, and has commis-
sioned the first in a series of

plays, "The Dawn of Freedom,"
on the feminist struggle, which
will be touring the U.S. over the
next year.
Plans for this spring and fall
include the publishing of a pic-
torial magazine, the commission-
ing of a folk-sing troupe to tour
the country, the preparation of a
manfesto, possible radical his-
torical TV documentaries, and
the establishment of oral history
workshops around the country.
At the local level, more con-
crete projects are being initiated,
such as the undertaking of Ralph
Nader-type projects to examine
the history of local land owner-
ship and corporate and govern-
mental controls in the area.
What does the government's
Bicentennial Commission think
of its radical counterpart? Daniel
Buser, its spokesman, says that
his commission welcomes all
types of participation to empha-
size different views of the anni-
versary.
As Buser comments, "Thank
God it's America because other-
wise, you couldn't do that sort of
thing."

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For Details Call:
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Larry Kaufman-764-7692
Steven Eder-763-2790
Carol Klau-663-8227
or
Steven Zacks-Studentours
483-4850

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1

LStateStreet at Liberty

..,

m

SEXISM & RACISM

LECTURE BY
Margaret Sloan
. Operation Breadbasket
Gloria Steinem
Editor, Ms. magazine
MON., FEB. 14-8:30 P.M.
POWER CENTER
Tickets $1.50-on sale Feb. 8-14
Michigan Union, Fishbowl, at the door

Chicago

7

(Continued from Page 1)
of Students for a Democratic
Society, and Rennie Davis, an
early SDS leader.
Lee Weiner, a former Univer-
.sity of Chicago instructor, and
John Froines, an instructor at the
University of Oregon, were acquit-
ted of all charges but were includ-
ed in the contempt citations.
The seven defendants spent two
weeks in the Cook County, Chicago
Jail after the trial before an ap-

)peal to start
forts to prevent Seale from disrupt-
ing the trial-including binding and
gagging.
Daily staff
(Continued from Page 1)
Steve Evseeff is a junior in po-
litical science from Birming-
ham. He is responsible for the
distribution of the more than
9000 copies of the Daily printed
each day.
-rl- _ - - c i11 if_

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All Speakers of English as a Second Language* Are
Invited to Take Part in an Experimental Test of Eng-

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