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February 06, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-06

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Sunday, February 6, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Page Nine

Purdue

boils

Michigan

cagers

Against
Te Wall
F Boys whittle.
... Michigan timbers
By JOHN PAPANEK
Special to the Daily
WEST LAFAYETTE
A TESTY looking Johnny Orr walked out of the Michigan
lockerroom and told the small gathering of reporters exactly
what they had just seen.
"(Bob) Ford and (William) Franklin really took it to us
on offense, didn'tthey?" he asked rhetorically. "That was the
difference in the game."
Purdue's two workhorses pummeled Michigan for'57 points,
nearly all of them coming from the inside, where the Wolverines
are supposed to be one of the strongest teams around. But
Michigan's brutes just weren't up to it yesterday.
6-10 Ken Brady, the biggest man on the court for either
team'was Michigan's high rebounder with nine, while his
man, Franklin, pulled down 20 and scored 28 points.
"We took Brady out for a while in the second half to rest
him," Orr said. "And besides, Franklin was going nuts."
The Wolverines leading rebounder, John Lockard, had his
most disappointing performance of the season, but that was
partly because he was playing on a sore knee suffered in prac-
tice a few days ago. Lockard and Brady missed three layups
each in the first half when the game was close; and those twelve
points could have made the game a whole, different story for
Michigan.
"The first ten minutes, we really had the good shots," said
Orr, whose game plan was to get the ball inside to the big men
and watch Franklin and Ford sluff off. "We just couldn't get
the ball in the basket."
Meanwhile, Ford was scoring like mad, and Ernie Johnson,
trying fruitlessly to stop the stocky 6-7 senior, had the beat
view of it all.
"There was just nothing I could do to stop him," said
the Big E. "He was pushing me around real good, and
getting good position. But it seemed that even when I did
get position, he still got the ball."
The win was a big one for Purdue coach George King. "This
one makes the Big Ten race look a lot better, but there's a long
way to go yet.
"I really didn't expect to dominate Michigan's big men
the way we did. But our guys did a tremendous job. That's been
our problem this year - whether we play a zone or man-to-man
we have trouble getting the ball off the boards. I felt that
Michigan's big scoring average has been due more to their
board game than their running. So we went out to get the boards
today."
The physical tenor of the game took its toll on both teams,
but Michigan was forced to shuttle players around all game.
Henry Wilmore, who started the game at guard, picked up three
fouls by the middle of the first half. He came out with eight
minutes left, and Lockard, who had been resting his knee, came
back in, and played his best ball of the day.
Lockard did manage to fire up the crowd of 13,584 fana-
tic Hoosiers in the closing minutes of the first half, when he
backed into Franklin and sent him flying to the pines. A
minute before, Brady had done the same to Ford, and the
frustrated crowd, watching the last two minutes of the half
go by without either team breaking the 37-37 deadlock,
brought the house down.
But Lockard must have had more than he can handle, be-
cause when the second half started, he was on the bench, and
Wilmore was in his forward spot. Playing in the corner for the
rest of the game, Wilmore came alive and scored 22 of his
26 points.
"With Henry at forward, we lose a little on the boards," Orr
noted, "but he helps by drawing all those fouls."
In fact, Wilmore was so deadly from the line (12 for 14)
that with about ten minutes left in the game, King decided
to put his Boilermakers back into the 3-2 zone that they played
in the first half.
"We had about seven fouls and Michigan had none.
We felt if we kept fouling, we'd lose the game at the line,
especially with Wilmore shooting like he was," King ex-
plained.
But in the end, Orr tried his best to be optimistic. "We're
5-2, that's half the schedule. If we can go 5-2 in the second half,
I think we'll be alright. Things just didn't seem to bounce right
for us today. Everytime we were coming back, we'd miss a shot
or lose the ball.
"I'd like to see a lot of things better, but it's awful hard
to win on the road."

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Special To The Daily
WEST LAFAYETTE - Purdue's
Bob Ford and Bill Franklin de-
stroyed Michigan inside with a
combined 57 points and 32 re-
bounds and led the Boilermakers
to a 84-74 Big Tenbasketball vic-
tory yesterday.
Ford and Franklin roamed free
under the boards at both ends of
the court for easy layups, short
hooks, and tip-ins, while Wolver-
ine big men Ernie Johnson, Ken
Brady and John Lockard refused
to challenge the Boilermaker duo.
It was a tight contest through
half of the second period. The
score was knotted 37-all at inter-
mission and both teams took small
leads at the start of the sec-
ond half.
But with 11:52 left in the con-
test and Purdue up by two Ford
and Frank Kendrick hit two buc-
kets to increase the lead to six and
Don Lund, Michigan's Assist-
ant Athletic Director has been
appointed to Associate Ath-
letic Director, replacing Dave
Strack. Strack will become
Athletic Director at the Uni-
.versity of Arizona on Feb. 15.
Lund's appointment becomes
effective on March 1.
Purdue slowly but surely pulled
away to a 71-61 lead with 7:31
left.
Michigan closed the gap to five
at 3:48, mainly on the strength of
Henry Wilmore's aggressive foul-
drawing antics, but a late Wol-
verine press was ineffective and
Purdue sank some easy buckets
to end the contest.
A poor display of basketball
opened the game as neither team
seemed to want to keep the ball
or put it in the hoop.
The Wolverines were getting the
ball inside Purdue's zone for good
shots early in the game, but the
layups were not falling in. Michi-
gan managed to blow six layup at-
tempts in the first half alone.

SUNDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITOR: BOB ANDREWS

Both squads were as ice-cold as
the weather outside Mackey Arena,
shooting under 35 per cent for the
first half.
Purdue burst out to an early
12-5 lead as Michigan couldn't
buy a bucket, despite several good
opportunities. Sloppy play mark-
ed the entire first half.
The Wolverines managed to
take a 31-30 lead with 4:10 re-
maining, but neither squad could
get any kind of momentum going
and the half-time deadlock re-
sulted.
Wilmore and John Lockard got
into foul trouble in the first half
as each drew three personals.
Wilmore sat out the last five and
a half minutes of the period and
only had four points. Lockard was
ineffective both on defense and
offense and sat out the start of
the second half as Wilmore was
shifted to forward.
Wilmore responded by fouling
out Kendrick and drawing four
fouls on his replacement, Bruce
Rose. But Wilmore's foul shoot-
ing and twenty-two second half
points were not enough to keep
Michigan in the game.
The Wolverines encountered in-
creasing difficulty in getting the
ball inside after intermission as
Purdue's defense tightened up.
With Wilmore at forward, Purdue
began to double-team him, but
Michigan couldn't find the open
man underneath.
Ford, covered by Johnson inost
of the afternoon, worked his way
into position close in time after
time and Purdue's guards fed him

and Franklin all day. Franklin's
shot was not on as he went 10 for
32, but he followed his misses sev-
eral times and put in the offen-
sive rebounds.
As a result of Ford's and Frank-
lin's boarding the Wolverines
were outrebounded for one of the
few times this season.
Michigan coach Johnny Orr
called Purdue "a little better
boarders" than the other teams
Michigan has played. He added,
"Ford and Franklin took it to us
on offense. I think that was the
difference. Ford did a great job
inside."
Ford tallied 29 points and
Franklin added 28 points and
twenty caroms. Wilmore led the
Wolverines with 26 points, thanks
almost entirely to his second-half

barrage, but continues to be pos-
sibly the poorest-shooting All-
American in the country with a
7-20 floor performance. Hank is
shooting around 38 per cent for
the current campaign.
Johnson contributed 15 points,
with many of his field goals com-
ing as the flyer on Michigan's
occasionally - effective fast-break.
Touted as one of the best defen-
sive forwards in the nation by his
coaches, the Big E had his sneak-
ers singed by Ford all afternoon.
Several times during the first
half and once early in the second
Michigan seemed to be on the
verge of taking control of the
game, but each time either Ford
or Franklin put the damper Fon.
The Wolverines turned the ball
over an unlucky thirteen times be-
fore intermission.
Orr summer up the frustrating
game that dropped Michigan's Big
Ten record to 5-2 with this com-
ment: "We made a few mis-
takes when we shouldn't have;
things didn't bounce quite right
when we were coming on; at that
crucial time, they'd score. I think
they (Purdue) played very well.
We're really two strong boarding
teams and I thought Ford and
Franklin were outstanding today."

-Associatea ress
WAYNE GRABIEC reaches a sinewy arm over the shoulder of
Purdue guard Tom Gilbert during yesterday's slap-happy- 84-74
Wolverine loss at West Lafayette. Gabby rifled in 13 points and
continued his fine rebounding with seven caroms.

GAGNON HAT TRICKS:

leers

sweep

Tig

Curses, boiled again!

TM it l

MICHIGAN

Johnson
Lockard
Brady
Wilmore
Grabiec
Hart
Buiss
Bernard
Witten
TEAM
TOTALS

fg
7-13
1-7
4-8
7-20
5-10
3-8
1-1
0-.
0-0

ft
1-3
0-0
0-0
12-14
3-3
2-3
0-0
0-0
0-0

r
8
4
9
6
7
3
0
2
1
5
45

pf
2
4
2
3
5
1
2
0
0

tp
15(
2
8
26
13
.8
2
0
0

Ford
Kendrick
Franklin ]
Gilbert
Gamauf
Luke
Rose
Price
TEAM'
TOTALS
SCORE
MICHIGAN
Purdue

PURDUE
fg
14-24 1
3-7 4
10-32 8
2-6 0
2-6 5
1-3 0
1-1 0
0-1 0

ft
-1
4-4
811
0-0
0-1
0-0
0-0

r pf tp
12 2 29
6 5 10
20 2 28
0 1 4
2 19
6 4 2
1 2 0
52 21 84
S:
37 37--74
37 47--84

By FRANK LONGO
Hampered by, of all things, a
lack of players, the Michigan icers
nearly squandered a three goal
lead late in the game but hung
on fora 9-6 win over Colorado
College last night.
With only 14 players dressed and
available for duty, Coach Al Ren-
frew's squad completed a sweep
over the Tigers with its second
straight four-point victory to boost
it into an eighth place tie in the
WCHA.
Leading 6-3 with less than 12
minutes remaining in the third
period, Michigan allowed Colorado
to close the gap with a pair of
quick goals, one while the Blue
held a two-man advantage.
But a break-away goal by Bob
Falconer, set up with a brilliant
pass from Julian Nixon, took most
of the pressure off the Wolverine

defense. Even a last minute Tiger
goal, which was offset by two late
Michigan tallies, added little to
the outcome.
Michigan came out skating like
crazy in the first minute of the
opening period, controlling the play
almost exclusively. But it was the
Tigers who scored first when Steve
Sertich deflected a pass into the
Michigan goal on Colorado's first
break into Wolverine territory.
It took only 20 seconds for the
Blue to tie the score, however,
when Rick Mallette fired a wrist
shot over goalie Doug Schum's
left shoulder on a semi-break set
up by Falconer.
Bernie Gagnon tallied his first
of three goals for the night at
5:01 when he backhanded a re-
bound off a Jerry Lefebvre shot
past Schum with Colorado's Bob
Winograd in the penalty box for
slashing.

Michigan's "Punch" Cartier went
off for charging at 7:20 and the
Tigers would have had a goal if
it weren't for some sloppy stick-
handling around the goal mouth.
But when Gagnon was sent off
elbowing at 9:46, it took only 31
seconds for Colorado's Mike
Bertsch to knot the score at 2-2.
Bertsch backhanded a rebound off
a shot by Doug Palazzari into the
corner of the goal.
Randy Trudeau put the Wolver-
ines ahead once again at 12:30
of the period when his slap shot
from the right point slipped under
Schum's foot and Michigan had
a 3-2 lead at intermission.
Late in the period Frank Wer-
ner missed a chance to add to the
total when he slipped and fell
just after receiving a perfect pass
from Bucky Straub on a two-on-
one break when the Wolverines'
were shorthanded.

33-80 18-23
BY PERIODS

28-68 18-23

19 74

ers
At the outset of the second per-
iod, league leading scorer Palaz-
zari, tied the game for the final
time for the Tigers when he col-
laborated with Sertich on yet an-
other two-on-one break at 1:50.
Cartier returned to the box at
5:06 for roughing but Rick Mal-
lette and Bob Falconer did an ex-
cellent job of killing the penalty,
forcing the play into, the Cold-
rado end and even getting three.
good shots on goal.
Once again the Michigan power
play took effect alter the Tigers'
Mike Mallinger was sent off at
7:36 for interference. It took only
30 seconds for Gagnon to score
his second goal, with most of
the work being done by Cartier,
who stickhandled through the en-
tire Color'ado team before passing
off to Bernie in front of the net.
Michigan had a two man ad-
vantage late in the period but
failed to capitalize when Falconer
was sent off almost immediately
afterwards for afi illegal check,
C.C. Rider
FIRST PERIOD SCORING: 1. C-Ser-
tich (Pye, Palazzari) 1:02; 2. M-Mallette
(Falconer) 1:22; 3. M-Gagnon (Kardos,
Lefebvre) 5:01; 4. C-Bertsch (Palazzari,
. Sertich) 10:19; 5. M-Trudeau (unassist-
ed) 12:30. PENALTIES: 1. C-Winograd
(slashing) 4:21; 2. M-Cartier (charging)
7:20: 3. M-Gagnon (elbowing) 9:46; ,4.
M-Mallette (interf.) 14:53; 5. M-Werner
(high sticking) 17:17.
SECOND PERIOD SCORING: 6. C-
Palazzari (Serttch)' 1:50; 7. M-Gagnon
(Cartier, Lefebvre) 8:06. PENALTIES: 6.
M-Cartier (roughing) 3:06; 7. C-Main-
ger (interf.) 7:36; 8. C-Allen (tripping)
11:42; 9. C-Bertsch (tripping) 13:28; 10.
M-Falconer (Ill, check) 13:50; 11. A-
Lefebvre (tripping) 19:02.
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: 8. M-Car-
tier (Nixon) ;6:03; 9. M-Straub (Wer-
ner) 7:27; 10. C-1aldrica (O'Conner,
Bertsch) 8:23; 11. C-Palazzarl (unassist-
ed) 10:08; 12. At-Falconer (Mallette,
Nixon) 16:36; 13. C-Pye (Palazzari, Ser-
tich) 19:19; 14. M-Gagnon.(Paris) 19:44;
15. M-Kardos (Gagnon) 19:55. PENAL-
-TIES: 12. C-Stebe (interf.) 9:00.;_13. C-
Mallinger (interf.) 9:09.
GOALIE SAVES

I -r "t " "

-u -
'Japan sweeps ski jump medals;
Schenk nets second skating gold

By The Associated Press
SAPPORO, Japan - Host Japan
captured its first Winter Olympic
goald medal ever and fleet Ard
Schenk flashed to a record smash-
ing victory for his second speed
skating gold at the 11th Winter
Games today.{
Russia's crack skiers claimed
their second gold in the only other
medal event scheduled for today.
Yukio Kasaya sent the Japanese
fans into a frenzy, taking the 70-
meter ski jump with leaps of
275.58 and 264.10 feet while Em-
peror Hirohito .watched.
Japan swept the silver and branze
medals for the event as well-the
first nation to take all three places
in any competition at these Games.
Akitsugu Konno was second and
Seiji Aochi third for the Japanese
sweep.
Schenk, the flying Dutchman
who won the 5,000-meter race Fri-
WIN

day, shattered the Olympic stand-
ard for the 1,500 meters, dashing
around the rink in 2 minutes, 2.96
seconds. The time was well off
Scehnk's own world record for the
event of 1:58.70 but was good
enough for his second gold.
The silver medal went to Roar
Gronvold of Norway in 2:04.26.
Gronvold was also second to
Schenk in the 5,000-meter. Swe-
den's Goran Claesson took the
bronze in 2:05.89.

in the same event at Grenoble but
was never challenged today, read-
ing the race from start to finish.
Other American finishers were
Alison Owen of East Wenatchee,
Wash., 35th in 38:50.05; Margie
Mahoney of Anchorage, Alaska,
36th in 39:27.95 and Trina Hosmer
of Santa Monica, Calif., 41st in
40:40.56.
Later today, America's Jo Jo
Strbuck and Ken Shelley of Dow-
ney, Calif., began their medal

WINTER OLYMPICS
SAPPORO'72

HOOSIERS FINALLY N

Bucks blast consin

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ninth
ranked Ohio State survived a ca-
reer-high 32 points by Leon How-
ard and pulled away in the closing
minutes yesterday for a 79-69 Big
Ten basketball triumph over Wis-
consin.
The victory, the sixth in seven
conference games for the Buck-
eyes, kept them in the thick of the
Big Ten race. Wisconsin fell to a
2-3 conference mark.
Wardell Jackson and Dan Ger-
hard, the only starting sophomores
for Ohio State, led the late Buck-
eye surge. Gerhard, who scored 19
" points, hit 13 of those in the sec-
ond half, while Jackson, ,who had
18, put in 10 in the second half.
Howard scored 15 straight points
at one stretch in the first half
and had 21 at halftime, when OSU,
had a 36-34 lead, keeping thej
Badgers in contention.

9-6 overall, while MSU is 2-4 and
9-7, respectively.
Indiana led most of the way,
building a 39-34 halftime lead. The
Spartans cut the margin to 48-45
early in the second stanza, but
never got closer as the Hoosiers led
by as many as 15 points, 65-50.
The game's high scorer was
Spartan sophomore Mike Robinson
with 31 points, three less than he
scored against the Hoosiers last
week.
Gophers squeeze
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. -- Jim
Brewer sank a field goal with 90
seconds to play and then a free
throw with 12 seconds as the Min-
nesota Gohpers overcame persist-
ant Iowa 53-52 last night and kept

their share of the Big Ten basket-
ball lead with Ohio State.
Brewer's three points gave the
Gophers a 53-50 lead that stood
up when Harold Sullinger scored a
field goal for Iowa with one sec-
ond to play.
The victory gave Minnesota a
6-1 record in conference and 12-4
overall, and dropped Iowa to 1-5
and 7-9.
It was, Minnesota's first home
game since the free-for-all game
against Ohio State Jan. 25, and
there were no major incidents.
However, the crowd of 16,784
gasped when Iowa's Kevin Kun-
nert and Minnesota's Dave Win-
field landed on the floor and
squared off when they got to their
feet. Cooler heads prevailed, how-
ever.
*. * *
Wildcats tamed
CHAMPAIGN, Ill.--C. J. Schroe-
der converted 10 straight free
throws in the final eight minutes
yesterday to lehd Illinois to a 68-
59 Big Ten basketball victory over

Schenk will try to complete an
Olympic speed skating triple crown
Monday in the 10,000-meter test.
Salina Koulakova, a 29-year-old
school teacher, gave the Soviets
the gold medal in the women's 10-
kilometer cross country race. She
covered the 6.2 mile course in 34
minutes, 17.82 seconds, beating
teammate Alevtina Olunina, who
took the silver medal in 34.54.11.
The bronze medal went to Fin-
land's Marjatta Kajosmaa, who
was timed in 34:56.45. The top
American finisher was Martha
Rockwell of Putney, Vt., who was
timed in 36:34.22 for 16th place.
Miss Koulakova's victory in the
women's 10-kilometer event fol-
lowed Vyacheslav Vedenin's tri-
umph in the men's 30-kilometer
cross country race on Friday. The
Russians won only one gold medal
in Nordin-skiing at the last iWnter
Olympics at Grenoble, France in
1968.
Miss Koulakova finished sixth
I SCOR ES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Ohio U. 80, Western Michigan 79
Kansas St. 69, Missouri 67
Marshall 70, Long Island U. 61
Califronia 84, Stanford 70.
Ferris St. 100, Wayne State 68
Kentucky 85, Vanderbilt 80, ot
New Mexico 80, Utah 69
Maryland 77, Duke 58
Detroit at St. Bonaventure, post.
Marquette 79, DePaul 61
Bowling Creen 77, Miami (O.) 75
Louisville 92, Drake 75

quest in pairs figure skating with
the start of the compulsory figures
portion of the competition.
Favored in the event were Rus-
sia's team of Irina Rodnina and
Alexei Ulanov, the world cham-
pions.
Today's only other action in-
volved Group B ice hockey.

I

Aum-mer

L rU

M-Bagnell

8 12 1"92

-Daily-Rolfe Tessem CC-Schum 9 14 12-35
BERNIE GAGNON finds the going rough as he digs for the puck SCORING BY PERIODS
in last night's 9-6 Wolverine victory. Guarding the Tiger goal are
goalie Doug Schum (22), defensemen Al Hendrickson (20) and MICHIGAN 3 1 5-9
Colorado College 2 1 3-6
Mike Mallinger (2). Attendance--3,300

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Bob Frasor held leading confer- t
ence scorer Allan Hornyak to only
one field goal and eight points
before the Badger fouled out witth
16:15 to play.

Big Ten Standings

l

Ohio State
Minnesota

W L
6 1
6 1

Pct.
.857
.857

0

I

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