100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 06, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 6, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, February 6, 1972

Ike and Tina's latest rockers

By HARRY HAMMIT,
Ike and Tina Turner are re-
presented by two albums on the
market right now. The first
is a live two record set record-
ed at Carnegie Hall and the se-
cond is a studio album.
The live album is entitled
What You Hear is What You
Get (United Artists UAS-9953).
If the people in the audience at
Carnegie Hall heard what is
preserved on this record, they
really got their money's worth.
Of course it's impossible to re-
create this particular concert,
but if it is any indication of
what Ike and Tina are like
live - and from what I've
heard it is - then their show
should have been well worth the
price. If you didn't make it to
the show, the album makes an
awfully good consolation prize.
It's people like Ike and Tina
who are responsible for some oft
the new white musicians, partic-
ularly Delaney and Bonnie. But
as good a singer as Bonnie
Bramlett is, she simply is no
match for Tina Turner's soul.
Even the Ikettes, who are hand-
picked for their singing abilities,
can't hold a candle to Tina.
The album begins with the
typical announcer introducing
the Ikettes who do an ad-
mirable job on two numbers of
their own with some soul har-
monies on "Piece of My Heart."
But things don't really begin to
move until Tina is introduced.
After the introduction and a
short little thing by the band
and the Ikettes, Tina immedi-
ately leads the band into "Sweet
Soul Music" which quickly ends,

its place taken by "Ooh Poo
Pah Doo." She gets even better
on "Honky Tonk Women" and
the entire revue really begins to
move when they get into "A
Love Like Yours (Don't Come
Knockin' Everyday)." They sus-
tain this peak of excitement
throughout "Proud Mary" and
an encore of the same song. The
excitement begins to drop just
a little when they slow down
the tempo to do some blues.
Tina is an incredible blues
singer; the only person that
seems comparable is the legen-
dary Billy Holiday. They get
into "I Want To Take You
Higher" next, which is a low
point for me. But, by side four
things are getting better as they
do "I've Been Lovin' You Too
Long" which includes an ex-.
change between Ike and Tina.
The album closes with "Re-
spect" which is'good, but disap-
pointing in light of what has
preceded it.
This album constantly re-
minds me of the Mad Dogs al-
bum and there are some ob-
vious similarities. They both
use the big band and the chorus.
Cocker's band and chorus sound
a little better, but this is most-
ly because they were a lot big-
ger and got a bigger sound.
Cocker's album has more va-
riety; the Turners play high-

energy music with blatant soul
overtones throughout. But, it
must be remembered that Cock-
er's band came from the con-
cept of Ike and Tina andother
black soul bands.
Tina sums up their music
perfectly, "We never ever do
nothin' nice and easy, we al-
ways do things nice and rough."
If you enjoy exciting music
that's "rough" all the way, then
see Ike and Tina, or get this al-
bum.
In contrast to this, there is
Nuff Said (United Artists UAS-
5530), their new studio album.
The album is fairly typical soul
music throughout, and it's pret-
ty well done, but it never reach-
es the level of excitement pres-
ent on their live album. There
are some nice things, "Baby
(What You Want Me To Do)"
and "What You Don't See (Is
Better Yet)," and the title track
which is a good soul instru-
mental. But, on the other hand,
they try to pass off something
like "Moving Into Hip Style-A
Trip Child!" which is no more
than a shallow reworking of
"Proud Mary."

SUNDAY MATINEE
ONLY
ALL SEATS-75c
JOURNEY TO THE
BEGINNING OF TIME
IN FULL COLOR
SHOWN 1 & 3 P.M.
ALSO-WALT DISNEY
CARTOON- FUN-FEST
PuPTH Por'uJM
DOWWt4TOWAM ARBOS
"luffORMAf l~T4.9T

Tune Them in
The folks over at WCBN, the student-run radio station, are feeling slightly insecure. They've just gone FM at 89.5 on your radio dial
and they are afraid that no one is listening to them. Tune them in and give them a call at 761-3500.

Hedy
By PAULA THOMAS
Hedy West played the Ark Fri-
day night to a small, but com-
fortably sized audience. Ac-
companing herself on banjo and
guitar, she presented a c o n-
stant, rhythmic quality not only
in "her instrumental work, but
also in her unusual singing style.
West has developed an uncom-
mon technique of rushing
through her words in a h a 1 f
singing, half speaking voice,
which is very successful not only
in setting a, definite up-tempo
mood; but also in allowing her
to maintain an almost constant
hold on the audiences' attention.
Extremely well versed in many
different forms of traditional
music, West brought a wide var-
iety of both rare and common
ballads to her audience. She was
able to enhance such common-
placed "folksongs" - as M a t t y
Groves and The House Carpen-
ter not only through her non-
poetic, to the point versions; but
also transform them (through
-her singing-speaking approach)
back into the exciting, humorous
songs they were before the "folk-
boom" came along and ruined
them. .
Perhaps it is because M i s s
West is a high powered perform-
er, and has geared herself to
larger, folk festival type aud-

est at th
iences that she seemed ill-at-
ease with the more intimate, r,-
laxed atmosphere which is pre-
valent at the Ark. She was con-
stantly accenting her phrases
with jerky movements of h e r
head and instruments. eichough
this went over well during t h e
first set it had a tendency to set
up more of a barrier with t h c
majority of the audience as the
evening progressed. .

Le Ark; up-tempo

U

Although I would rather see her
more relaxed, I don't think that
this factor destroyed the musi-
cal quality of the evening.
Appearing at the Ark tonight
is Earl Robinson, composer and
singer of left wing music from
the late 40's and early 50's.
Robinson was a communist
during that time and was black-
. images

listed after going thru the House
of Un-American Activities Com-
mittee trials.
Robinson wrote such sings as
Joe Hill, the half-hour Ballad
for Americans, and the music
for the movie Hurry Sundown.
He will be appearing at 8:30
and the charge is $1.50.

Program Information 8-6416
IT'S SO FANTASTIC
YOU FIND YOURSELF
FEELING SORRY
FOR EVEN
THE BAD GUYS!
ILLY

TODAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Oh where h a v e you
been B I L L Y JACK,
BILLY JACK? Oh
where have you been
Charming Billy?

I

Join Us At A
PUBLIC
MEETING On
MONDAY at 8 p.m.
Come ye revolutionaries,
Come ye saints,
Come ye who are
structuralists,
And ye who ain't.
Come ye who love business,
And ye who can paint,
And ye who love movies
Me thinks ye quite quaint.
-SHAKESPEARE
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

.L

Artis Fair
An Arts Fair featuring over
60 artists is being held this
afternoon in the Union Ball-
room from noon to 5.
The fair, an outgrowth of July's
large free art fair, will have ex-
hibits ranging from pottery and
candle making to glass blowing.
The local artists will have their
works on display and are offer-
ing them for sale.
The fair is open to the public
free of charge and is being spon-
sored by the Student Govern-
ment Council, the University Ac-
tivities Center and the Office of
Student Services.

-Daly-Robert wargo
SUNDAY
THE NIGHT THEY RAIDED MINSKY'S
1969, dir. Norman Lear
The director-writer for All in the Family turns his wit to the
subject of burlesque.
"You'll have no problem enjoying this engaging film, just watch
how it captures the attractive, sleazy quality of old-time bur-
lesque, and the comedians whose. racy material filled out the stage
waits between the strippers."-Steven H. Schever
come see how your professors and fathers spent their college days
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
7:00 & 9:00-AUD. A; ANGELL HALL; 75c

. . . HE'LL MAKE YOU ANGRY ...
EVEN MAKE YOU FURIOUS . . . OR,
IF YOU'RE A WOMAN-BREAK YOUR
HEARTI . . . ABOVE ALL THERE'S
HOPE!
COLOR
PRESENTS
on SATURDAY and SUNDAY
THE ANN ARBOR PREMIERE OF
R.ollectionneuses
thefort o EicRohers roosd sN+i M%:}.:rali
Tae."I wsmaeou fseunc n"97,tu
.... . . . f .
DIR. ERIC ROHMER, 1967. La Collectionneuse is
the fourth of Eric Rohmer's proposed "Six Moral
Tales." It was made out of sequence in 1967, thus
preceding My Night at Maudi's (number three) and
Claire's Knee (number five) . It is the story of a
summer love affair which actually never takes place.
PLUS A SHORT: ANEMIC CINEMA
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
7 and 9 p.m. 75c

Come to the
GRAD COFFEE
HOUR
on
Wednesday,
February 9th
4-6 p.m. 4th floor Rackhom
Hot Chocolate and Donuts

'V

FEBRUARY

ART FAIR

Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

WHEN: Sunday, February 6, 12-5 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open to Everyone; No Admission Charge
Artists interested in selling or displaying their work should call 764-7409
or go to room 240 Michigan Union for information and registration. Regis-
tration closes Friday, Feb. 4.
SPONSORED BY: STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER

1

I

L

a

Wednesday Arts and (rals Fair
open to everyone-
$2.00 charge to display and sell
IT'S YOUR
ART WORK Programming
selling and STUDENT development of
displaying on cultural and artistic
commission basis programming
1 st floor Union GALLERY
SUPPORT IT!
1st FLOOR UNION selling and display
WED.-SUN. at photography,
12:30-4:30 macrame, knitting,
people neededI to -__ otr.etc.on

the ann arbor film cooperative I
MARLON BRANDO in GILLO PONTECORVO'S
3 (By the director of
THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS)
A British agent foments revolution on a Caribbean island to further his country's commercial in-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan