100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Sf9L A& rtg!3n

43ftity

page three

..i;t~ a ~~ .s t l:?, :: J .. . /;". " . "~ ''v;:::4 L}¢ :4v '{'";ra1C' .4 {Y4V:'t"":""":'.{fi$"tfl~, :"!l
1CU

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Saturday, February 5, 1972

WINIER
CLEARANCE

news briefs
by The Associated Press
THE SENATE yesterday passed the last of the year's appro-
priations bills after adding $75 million for Bangladesh refugees.
Senate passage of the bill providing more than $3 billion for,
foreign aid and related programs, was by a roll-call vote of 45-23.
The bill came to the Senate floor $115 million below the House
total, but emerged $73 million above after the addition of $88 million
for Pakistani, Jewish and Cuban refugees and $100 million for theI
Alliance for Progress.
* * *I
U.S. JETS struck inside North Vietnam yesterday for the 35th
time this year.
If the so-called "protective reaction" strikes continue at that
rate, last year's total of 108 will be matched by April 17.
In the continuing American disengagement, the 7th Air Force
announced it will turn over six-year-old Phan Rang air base-one of
three remaining under U.S. control-to the South Vietnamese next
month.
Most U.S. air operations now are carried out from bases in
Thailand and carriers in the Gulf of Tonkin.
A U.N. RESOLUTION condemning Rhodesian actions wasI
vetoed by Great Britain in a Security Council session last night.
The measure-backed by the Soviet Union, China and the three
African members, Guinea, Sedan and Somalia-wpuld have condemned
Britain's recent settlement with Rhodesia, as well as recent arrests
and killings by Africans protesting the settlements.
Five members abstained-the United States, Belgium, Italy, France
and Japan.
British Ambassador Colin Crowe expressed his government's
concern over the situation, but added that the resolution called forj
actions "that in the current circumstances are not practical."'
* * *
THE UNITED STATES and the Soviet Union completed the
sixth round of the SALT talks yesterday.f

LANSING, (A - An antibusing amendment to the State
Constitution was offered in the State House today by Rep.
Joyce Symons (D-Allen Park) and 75 cosponsors of both
parties.
The proposal, if adopted, would outlaw court-ordered in-
tegration plans of the sort being prepared for Detroit, Kent
County and other school systems, unless overturned by a
federal court.
The proposed new section to Article B of the 1963 con-
stitution would read:
"A student shall not be assigned to, transported to, nor
compelled to attend any particular public school on account
of race, religion, color, national origin or any other purpose
without the prior written ap-
proval of the parent or guard-
ian." Tevel f
Th, .m.asurwhich w ild hnPa

Proposed amendment to state
constitution would halt busing

.. ..4n.":""....r....'.'....: r."::vivr{."...'... .?:¢::":.:"r?; ~:vr:..v."..h.:. ..;".?

r:
s.
i.L
f
:
;r::
;:.
{ :
f".
{.
yti
titi
a s
,.';
"s f ,

CAR COATS

Corduroys
Wools
Leath ers

$28

$38

3:,
r
;"r,.r:
::,f'
: '=
''+.i :
:i",'i
r.$:
;' ;:
:;{
:::,i
z>:

$48
Reg. to $135-

-Associated Press
Adversaries meet
Georgia state Rep. Julian Bond (D-Atlanta) talks with Lt. Gov.
Lester Maddox at the House of Representatives in Atlanta yester-
day. Bond is seeking a contribution from Maddox for a black
YMCA's annual fund drive in his district.
MORE RECOGNITION:
Bangladesh asks to

J , 4 ,L$ V."4 A':4 "N4 tt V. ".444.. '.L'}..V .4 44"4 A YN 4.'.C::SY ":" " i
".'X+ mS d' .V . t r Xit4.'v. 4.S.. 4.4 s4; Gs,,":: <?.": ;,if.:;{.v: Ct}{,;:$::,};t r::. .

ie 1ebr,u Wili U1 ve
to be approved by a majority of
Svoters at a future election, appear-
ed certain of at least a House
hearing.
Five of the nine members on
the Revision of the Constitution
Committee, to which the bill was
assigned, were cosponsors.
Symons said quick approval by
the Legislature, where antibus-
ing sentiment is strong and has
registered majority backing be-
fore, could put the issue on the
ballot as early as May.
This section represents the third
time since October that the Legis-
lature has taken a stand against
busing.
On Oct. 27, 1971, both houses
approved a resolution urging the
State Board of Education to ap-
peal the ruling of a federal judge
which held that Detroit schools
are operating under de jure segre-
gation in violation of the U.S.
Constitution.
Two days later the legislature
approved a bitterly controversial
resolution urging Congress to con-
vene a special convention to con-
sider w r i t i n g an antibusing
amendment into the constitution.
Other legislation now pending in
the House after Senate passage
calls for May presidential primary
and party delegate elections. A
second target would be the August
primary.

a&U &V. 44"gry v w44x v4a, {":a44aW. ~,. .v" .."v:vay""{4 J " "o~a:,
" a} ! . {Y .{ {..e":'+":::: gni;rr}+?.:;;' , v }i{{.'.>.:::;.+:p;v}} ..a{4.. . .{.':t4.y

4,

There was so definite word on how far the two sides advanced .' 0
in their talks, but it was officially reported that the negotiating teamst
made "reasonable progress."
Chief U.S. delegate, Gerald Smith, said, "The U.S. delegation is I

FLARES
1/2 OFF

encouraged by the progress toward agreement on the complex issues
relating to strategic arms limitations."
A seventh round of talks was set for March 28.

____________t___ . t .. !"

..

THIS WEEKEND
The U.Mv. Folklore Society presents
TWO WORKSHOPS
ONE FREE & ONE NOT SO FREE
SATURDAY, 2 P.M.-Hedy West will give a free
workshop on traditional banjo styles.
SUNDAY, 8:30 p.m-Earl Robinson, black-listed
in the McCarthy era, will sing and talk about his
experiences.
$1.50, 50c for Folklore Soc.- members
Both Workshops will be presented at
THE ARK, 1421 HILL ST.
We would like to thank the Ark folks for
donating their facilities.
For Information Call 769-1769

'II

DACCA (03) - Bangladesh's government announced yesterday it
is seeking membership in the Commonwealth, a loose community of
former British colonies.
Ten countries announced yesterday that they now consider
Bangladesh an independent nation, no longer a province of Pakistan.
Announcements of recognition came from Britain, West Ger-
many, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Austria
and Israel.
Saying they soon would follow suit were Belgium, the Nether-
lands, Switzerland and Luxembourg.
Altogether 29 nations have recognized the government of Sheik
Mujibur Rahman, the prime min- .,-
<;0ei. mAll of .tha Cnvi 't. h ,,r P.X-

'.4

Reg. to $15.00
SHIRTS

wtrlrv7 jd-C~~1

: >
N.
r 'G
F
f
Y;:;
;{:
'f3%,.;
E %>
'%'i'i
i
:
.
.}
.) ;
r

LONG SLEEVE
7.88

Scept'Romania, followed India in
establishing early diplomatic rela-
tions.
The United States, Red China
and France remain among the big
powers to hold off. The United
States and the Chinese supported
Pakistan in its war with India in
December.
Rahman met foreign newsmen
after officially being informed of
British and West German recog-
nition. He said his government
planr ed embassy - level relations
with both countries as soon as
possible.
'"We are also adapting neces-
sary diplomatic measures to be-
come a member of the Common-
wealth, which is a multiracial as-
sociation of nations covering all
the continents," the shiek said.

POR SUFFER MoT p
Panel hits* hetto pollution

PERM. PRESS
for 15.00

2

jobs rises
this year
WASHINGTON (P) - The gov-
ernment reported yesterday that
the nation's total employment rose
in January while unemployment
dipped slightly. Secretary of La-
bor James Hodgson said the fig-
ures reflected real growth in the
economy.
The figures - adjusted for sea-
sonal factors - showed a rise of
240,000 in total employment to
80,636,000 and a drop in the job-
less rate from a revised 6 per
cent to 5.9 per cent of the work
force.
Actual figures showed a drop
of more than one million jobs and
a rise of 752,000 jobless but be-
cause employment usually drops
more and unemployment usually
increases more in January, the
Labor Department figured it as a
gain in jobs and a decline in un-
employment on a seasonally ad-
justed basis.
When the December unemploy-
ment figure was announced last
month, the bureau reported it at
6.1 per cent of the nation's work
force. However, the figure was
scaled downward to 6 perscent on
the basis of a revision made each
year and based on the previous
year's experience.
Unemployment hovered all last
year in the near 10-year high
range of 6 per cent and is certain
to be a major election issue.
The report also said average
hourly earnings of some 45 mil-
lion rank - and - file workers rose
3 cents an hour to $3.53, but a
drop in the length of the work
week lowered weekly earnings by
$1.35 to $129.20.
The weekly earnings figure was
up $7.32 or 6 per cent over the
past year. Inflation of 3.4 per
cent reduced the gain to $2.93.
"Employment is still on the
march - steadily upward' Hodg-
son said.
"Jobsdwere up nearly a quarter
of a million last month and more
than a million and a quarter in
the last six months. New people
are streaming into the labor mar-
ket, including many Vietnam vet-
erans. We must and will bring
these Americans into the main-
stream of American workers,"
Hodgson said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at-Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

II.

WASHINGTON (-) - P o or
people in the cities get sicker
quicker from pollution while the
government spends most of its
ecology funds on the needs of
suburbanites, a panel of urban
specialists said yesterday.
Contrary to general belief,
cthey said, most of the inner
city yictims of air, noise a n d
water pollution are whites.
Among the increasing ecologi-
cal hazards of city living cited
by witnesses at a Senate Com-
merce subcommittee were:

t.444>4'.W.44'449.449 "n} y".}v4 : '4 "v..4 -
7.d i..'^ .G ." ."T.y '.+ :i}. :.0 ,:. ""s W . ''ii : ++ni ~i ?}:

Phone 764-0558 to Subscribe to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-A doubling over the n e x t
15 years of noise pollution, 60
per cent of which comes from
cars owned by suburbanites;
-More fruitful breeding,
grounds for flies and roaches,
which leads to an overuse of
deadly pesticides;
-New evidence that city child-
ren are more susceptible to as-
thma and bronchitis as a result
of various kinds of air pollution;
-Fresh studies proving lead
poisoning from paint eaten by
children or breathed from auto
exhaust sharply limits how much
oxygen gets to the brains of city
dwellers; and
-The combination of malnu-
trition with low level digestion
of pesticides leads to early death
among the poor.

s-- -
f _ .____---__ _._-_______----.__ - I

v~ r rv r.4. 4.44 . 4w.444S .y44 r 4'W v ..r .w/JW y 4r.4t44
' 5'".r+ 4 xr~ >' 'r'. '444W.444444444444.4':s' c ^

sC
c{
i

Scarves & Gloves
YOUR CHOICE
O/ 0FF

r
:? .
>
:;;
,r.
::">
.:
r
J
ii
i%
..4.

WORSHIP

Aa....... ,".....J.44,44444444444.v fls." vfl.444f44.444r{.:h r w"rs. r.{.' ": +';{:i
r . %.4.{":"hvr.i 'rr."e~f.?:4.: 1 ;r";{{}W:;!d+rn J,"rr..:).4r+:,lK:"r:T a5Yf^%":

Y" a: .444444}'44. "" J lly.4y}} .4: y."X yr r. 44Wv: V.V.4444.4...yy... .4. l. .9'444444
r4. fCri ? 'LvC): r.4'."{:4444 7T. r ,r,""r i r "~'

C
F,
j
F
,Y"..4
''{-
5
ff
"{}
:j}"
f'i"
J
J !
i4
f~
i'
i

SWEATERS
YOUR CHOICE
/2 OFF

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist & Sermon
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer (chapel)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser, ;
Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Preaching: Mr. Sanders.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 a.m.-FAMILY WORSHIP-Boy
Sunday.

Scout

I

11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Fred Maitland
"Heavenly Songs for Earthly Streets"
Broadcast WNRS 1290 a.m., WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 to 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, February 6-
5:30 p.m.-Celebration, Wesley Lounge
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge, Mo-
vie and discussion, "Beggar at the
Gates."
Monday, February 7-
12:00 noon-Luncheon discussion class,
"The. Christian Faith and the Inner Life"
Pine Room. Lunch 25c.
Thursday, February 10-
12:00 noon-Discussion class, "The Life
of Jesus in Human Encounter," Pine Rm.
Lunch 25c.
Friday, February 1 1--
12:00 noon-Discussion Class, "The Life of
Jesus in Human Encounter," Pine Rm.
Lunch 25c.
6:15 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Dinner, Pine
Room. Movie and discussion, "Beggar at
the Gates." Wesley Lounce.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(LCMS) 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday services at 9:15 and 10:30
Wednesday service at 10:00 p.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761 -6749.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
AND CENTER
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:15 a.m.-Matins
11:00-Eucharist
6:00-Supper
WEDNESDAY
5 :15-Eucharist
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Celebration of Holy Communion
i1:00 a.m.-Coffee and conversation in the
lounge. A chance to get acquainted.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.
- -- -- - oA ti ii&- n-L I A I IL iI £ ft f'

Join Us At A
PUBLIC
b, a
MEETING On
MONDAY at 8 p.m.
Come ye revolutionaries,
Come ye saints,
Come ye who are
structuralists,
And ye who ain't.
r,- n ma n n1v i eeS

G JJ ! J NJ . y' yf ly V,.4A r} . !4. " ]4C fl.4... '.t.+. J~.J i "~J.t
...O44444tAfN'Vt'ft~V. :44 . .'l J. ...Jl: ...: * e~. J.lJti\ 7{1 :Vf:f %"f ..t'9i 1 V'' 9.44' i 1J

r" S:,: '.'.,J:{ ' ;dyJ~,er , :4'4}:; k9 "'9..4tri.9? i":J?.4. L ..,.....:1 L.!:{ . rf. ..
4 44VV,4449.'.444A, . . .:"
if r Li,,'v:?lJnrr..{F""{.. ..%'.: .. '. W .fJ......7 1N.m W ~ 'LJ hP 1''W '"<: ...

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149.
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R.

E. Simonson

11

I I

;

;f

H .. -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan