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February 04, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


. '

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All Speakers of English as a Second Language* Are
Invited to Take Part in an Experimental Test of Eng-
lish Language Proficiency to be Given in RACKHAM
LECTURE HALL AT 7:00 P.M. ON THE 9th of
FEBRUARY. You Will Receive $5.00 for Approxi-
mately 1 V2-2 Hours of Your Time. If Interested You
Must Call and Register at the Following Number:
764-2416, on or Before February 8th.
*NO ELI STUDENTS CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN THE INTEN-
SIVE ENGLISH COURSES ARE ELIGIBLE FOR THE TEST AT
THIS TIME.

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, February 4, 1972

I

THIS WEEKEND
The U.M. Folklore Society presents,
TWO WORKSHOPS
ONE FREE & ONE NOT SO FREE
SATURDAY, 2 P.M.-Hedy West will give a free
workshop on traditional banjo styles.
SUNDAY, 8:30 p.m.-Earl Robinson, black-listed
in the McCarthy era, will sing and talk about his j
experiences.
$1.50, 50c for Folklore Soc. members
Both Workshops will be presented at
THE ARK, 1421 HILL ST.
We would like to thank the Ark folks for
donating their facilities.
For Information Call 769-1769

news briefs,
by The Associated Press
CAMPAIGN GM, a stockholders organization, announced yes-
terday that it was expanding its activities to Ford, Chrysler and
other large corporations.
The group, which was formed only last year, has tried to increase
the decision making powers of the stockholders in overall corporation
policy.
With the increased influence, the stockholders hope to make the
corporations more socially responsible in areas such as ecology and
consumer affairs.
A GENERAL STRIKE by hundreds of thousands of Roman
workers closed virtually all businesses in the Italian capital
yesterday.
The strike was called to protest the deteriorating economic
conditions which have resulted in mass lay-offs in many industrial
areas.
The problem is compounded by an equally unstable political situa-
tion as the country has been without an effective government for the
past seventeen months.
Many fear that the social and economic unrest will aid the
Neo-Fascist Italian Social Movement.
* * *.
A MASS arrest of suspected subversives in Brazil continued
yesterday, as at least four Rio newspaper reporters were taken into
custody.
A source in the military-run government said more than 200
persons, mostly students, had been jailed since last weekend.
Under Brazil's military regime, the armed forces and police can
arrest anyone on suspicion of "endangering national security," and
hold him as long as they want.
The current wave of arrests was the biggest operation of its kind
in Brazil in more than a year.
SENATE LIBERALS failed for the second time yesterday to
end a Southern fillibuster on equal employment legislation.
The attempt to limit debate, led by Sens. Harrison A. Williams,
Jr. (D-N.J.) and Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.) fell six votes short of the
two-thirds majority required. Sen. Javits said a third attempt to end
debate will be made later.
The bill is designed to strengthen federal laws against employment
discrimination. It is opposed by southern Democrats and conserva-
tive Republicans who would rather see discrimination decisions left
to the courts where action against offenders is usually very slow.
* * *
THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION made a
ruling yesterday that would limit the growth of cable television.
The decision allows for some development of the new media, but
many concessions were made to protect the interests of the estab-
lished broadcasting agencies.
Commission chairmen Dean Burch hailed the decision as "his-
toric," but Nicholas Johnson, an outspoken liberal and a supporter
of cable television, saw the ruling as essentially destroying the pur-
pose of the cable system.
For the Student Body:

Committee trims
Nixon's request
for -debt -celing
WASHINGTON () - The House Ways and Means Com-
mittee voted yesterday to give the deficit-plagued Nixon
administration less than half the extra borrowing power it
had requested and to recall government economic spokesmen
by early summer for another grilling on the economy.
The Democratic-controlled committee approved for House
consideration a bill that would raise the ceiling on the na-
tional debt from the present $430 billion to $450 billion, but
only until June 30.
President Nixon had asked for a-

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Ang'ela's sister frisked
Fania Jordan, sister of Angela Davis, undergoes a security check
before entering a Santa Clara County Court where pre-trial hear-
ings are underway. Davis is on trial for murder in connection
with a courtroom shootout which resulted in the death of several
people.
SPACED-O UT:
Narcs take to the
tair in war on dope

raise to $480 billion with no time
limit.
While Congress routinely trims
administration requests for bor-
rowing power, no request in recent
years had been treated so roughly
as this one.
Secretary of the Treasury John
Connally had testified that the
$480 billion figure would- take
care of government borrowing
needs until February 1973, al-
though the budget for the year
ending next June 30 is estimated
to be $38.8 billion in the red and
the proposed budget for the fol-
lowing year short by $25.5 billion.
He said unless some relief was
granted promptly, the debt would
surpass the present ceiling around
March 1.
But Democratic members of the
committee soon made it evident
they had no intention of letting
the administration and its eco-
nomic policies off the financial
hook until after the November
presidential election.
Rep. Al Ullman (D-Ore.) who
presided over the committee ses-
sions on the debt ceiling, said aft-
erward that administration predic-
tions were unconvincing, espe-
cially since the size of the im-
pending deficits had not been
forecast.
"The committee was unwilling
to accept the administration's pro-
jections for a whole year, both of
revenues and expenditures,",Ull-
man said.
Chairman Wilbur Mills (D.
Ark.), who has been at home for
what aides described as a slow
recuperation from a back ail-
ment, did not take part in the
sessions. It was understood, how-
ever, that he approved of the de-
cision and intends to handle the
bill on the floor.
The schedule calls for the House
to pass the bill before beginning
its Lincoln's Birthday holiday at
the end of business Wednesday,
leaving the rest of the month for
Senate action on the measure.

CAPE KENNEDY, fP1) - The
narc, a natural enemy of all
dope smokers and growers, will
be even tougher to spot very
soon if the federal government
has anything to say about it.
The U.S. Treasury Depart-
ment's Bureau of Narcotics and
Dangerous Drugs has begun
work on the development of a
satellite that would be able to
detect marijuana and opium
poppy fields from a distance of
one hundred miles above the
ground.
At present, the department is
spending some two million dol-
lars in an attempt to determine
the signature of the marijuana
plant. The signature is the pat-
tern by which a plant reflects
heat and light during various
phases of its growth.
The system will not be per-
fect, however concedes Dr. Rob-
ert Miller of the Agriculture De-
partment, "because even with
an established signature, we

State probes
Hanrahan
Panther ease
From Wire Service Reports

won't be able to detect relative-
ly small crops of marijuana".
This limitation will make the
marijuana crop unique in the
field of agriculture since the
Agriculture Department policy
generally favors the larger grow-
ers at the expense of the small
farmer.
It is also unlikely that the
government will pay subsidies
,to large marijuana growers to
prevent them from over-produc-
ing, as is the case with other
cash crops.
To test the project, the gov-
ernment will grow three large
marijuana fields in the southern
United States, probably in Tex-
as. Florida and Arizona.
Once in operation, however,
the satellite will fly all over
the world and will turn over the
data it collects to other coun-
tries where it finds large de-
posits of the evil weed, as mari-
juana is often called by its de-
tractors.

Illinois State Attorney Edward
Hanrahan and thirteen co-defen-
dants pleaded innocent yesterday,
to charges of obstructing justice
stemming from a police raid in
which two Black Panthers were
killed.
A criminal court judge ruled
Wednesday, that Hanrahan and
the thirteen co-defendants had to
stand trial for their role in the
Panther incident.
Hanrahan is a onetime protege
of Mayor Richard Daley, and is
a candidate for re-election even
though the Daley organization
withdrew its support for his can-
didacy.
The court's ruling ended months
of legal maneuvering by the de-
fendants who were attempting to
avoid a trial in the politically ex-
plosive case.
Hanrahan, one of his assist-
ants and twelve Cook County po-
licemen, were indicted by a grand
jury on charges of trying to cov-
er up the facts after police raid-
ed a Panther apartment Dec. 4,
1969, in a search for weapons.
Black Panther leaders Mark
Clark and Fred Hampton were
killed by police gunfire during the
raid, which turned up an arsenal
of weapons.
The MichigantDaily, edited and man-
aged by students at. the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. subscription rates: $1Oby
carrier, $11 by mail,
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

HI-FI

LEVI'S
Denim
Bells
x8.00

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

All-Campus TG
Free Beer, Records, Dancing
Guys 50c, Girls lOc
FRI. 9-12 at 1345 Washtenaw

W T'l - T =1

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SHE MADE PLOWBOYS INTO PLAYBOYS .. .
"SWEET GEORGIA" X
NIGHTLY AT 7:05 & 10:45
-PLUS-
"The Man From Nowhere"
AT 8:50

I

Box Offices Open at 6:30
Show Starts at 7:00

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'PSILAN1
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.... .

L. .r.....

.. .,.

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL
9:00 P.M.
SPECIAL
Long Sleeve
Knit Shirts
$4
Outstanding savings
on machine washable
oll-cotton and
cotton/polyester
blend knits with a
variety of neck
styling. Solid colors,
two-tones, three-tones.
Sizes S,ML.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY
"THE GANG THAT COULDN'T
SHOOT STRAIGHT"
Plus-William Holden "WILD ROVERS"
BONUS--Rock Hudson Angie Dickinson
PRNETTY MADS ALL N A ROW" R
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Special Mystery Weekend!!
TWO GENRE CLASSICS:
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, 1951
(7:00 P.M. ONLY)
A great suspense movie in which two men meet on a train and
form an unholy alliance involving murder. Death comes at the
strangest places (tennis matches, merry-go-rounds) and the
absolutely breathless climax incorporates everything Hitchcock
is famous for. As for the star, critics worldwide agree that this
is Farley Granger's finest film.
BILLY WILDER'S
WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION, 1958
(9:00 P.M. ONLY)
The director of Sunset Boulevard turns himself to Agatha Chris-
tie's classic and excellently recreates the cleverness and suspense
of the original. It stars Charles Laughton, Tyrone Power, and
Marlene Dietrich, and they are uniformly brilliant.

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