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February 01, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PARTICIPATE
In Student Government,
L.S.A. Student Government is
interviewing now for:
2 seats executive council
4 seats judiciary
1 Administrative Vice President
other positions also available
SIGN UP 3M MICHIGAN UNION BY
5:00, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4
UAC-DAYSTAR Presents
"A meticulous and
highly proficient
musician'
>{' Montreal Star

it
f
I
I
I

i

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

t r r tg tn

D atly

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, February 1, 1972

by The Associated Press
SEN. BARRY GOLDWATER (R-Ariz.), yesterday said that

N.

Viets ask

"A resounding artistic
triumphBibd
B il lbaagrd

SAT., FEB. 12
Hill Aud.
8 P.M.
$4.50-3.00-1 .50

defense procurement needs a major overhaul.
Goldwater, a longtime ally of the Pentagon, told Kenneth Rush,
nominee for deputy secretary of Defense, that a headrolling overhaul
was necessary to halt "godawful waste" in money, manpower, and
time.
* .* *
THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION ordered all
the U.S. scheduled airlines yesterday to start screening passengers
and baggage for weapons on sabotage devices.
The new procedures, a result of the continuing menace of airplane;
hijackings, will go into effect Friday or Saturday. The rule will not
affect the supplemental airlines, which specialize in charter service,
or the foreign airlines, or air taxi companies.
* .* *
SWISS AUTHORITIES have issued a warrant for the arrest
of author Clifford Irving and his wife, a law enforcement official
said yesterday.{
Meanwhile, Irving's appearance before a Manhattan grand jury
was postponed indefinitely. The jury was to investigate what happened
to $650,000 the McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. gave the author to trans-
mit to billionaire recluse Howard Hughes.
Police in Zurich said an account had been opened in the Swiss
Bank Corp. under the name of Hannah Rosencrantz but declined to
confirm a CBS report that this was another pseudonym used by Irv-'
ing's wife, Edith.
LONGSHOREMEN INCREASED ECONOMIC PRESSURE yes-
terday in the West Coast dock strike by closing off U.S. shipper
access to Canadian and Mexican ports.
The employers countered by taking out full page ads calling for
public support for President Nixon's legislative proposal to end the
strike.
Meanwhile, negotiations were arranged to resume after the first!
meeting since Jan. 17 had concluded.
THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) announced
yesterday the government is moving to restrict sharply the use of
five antibiotics in feeds for food-producing animals.

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

for a coalition
'gv.in Saigon
PARIS (} -' North Vietnam denied yesterday it wants
a Communist government in Saigon, and said it seeks one
broadly based on national political and religious factions.
Nguyen Thanh Le, Hanoi's spokesman at the Vietnam
peace talks, said Secretary of State William Rogers "deliber-
ately sought to deform our positions" when he said Sunday
night Hanoi insisted on "a government of their choosing, a
Communist government" which the United States could
not accept.
Le said Hanoi wants "a large government of national
accord" to succeed the ad-v
ministration of P r e s i d e n t
Nguyen Van Thieu.

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW: Michigan Union,
noon-6 p.m. daily, and at both Salvation Record
Stores. In Ypsilanti, Ned's.

WOMEN'S COMMUNITY SCHOOL
ASTROLOGY-taught by Wendy. First meeting Sun., Feb. 6, 3:00 p.m.
in 1510 SAB.* This course will be a general discussion of astrology and
witchcraft with everyone learning together. For more information,
call 769-5962.
SYLVIA PLATH-taught by Nan and Stephannie. This is not a lecture.
Everyone will share ideas. For information call 665-0362.
AUTO MECHANICS-taught by David and Peter. First meeting Wed.,
Feb. 2, at 7:30 p.m., Room 332, Michigan Union. Info. call 663-2130
or 668-9091.
CRAFTS-taught by Joyce. First meeting Wed., Feb. 2 at 1:00 p.m. at
1510 SAB*. In this course all crafts may be learned. More informa-
tion call 439-7441.
HISTORY OF NON-VIOLENT CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE-taught by Roma.
First meeting Tues., Feb. 1, 8:00 p.m. 715 Hill. More info. 761-4437.
RECORDER-taught by Sally. First meeting Thurs., Feb. 3, 7:00 p.m.
1510 SAB.* This class is for recorder players of all levels. More info.
call 763-4186 and leave a message for Sally with your name and phone
numbers, or call 662-5400 on Thurs., Feb. 3, 7-8 p.m.
LESBIANISM-taught by some Ann Arbor gay women. First meeting
Friday, Feb. 4, 8 p.m. Rm. 332 Michigan Union. For more info. call
the gay advocate office, 763-4186.
WOMEN AND THEIR BODIES, A SELF-HELP COURSE-taught by
the Women's Health Collective. First meeting Thurs., Feb. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Basement Newman Center. For more info. call 769-2738.
SILKSCREENING-taught by Ann. First meeting Wed., Feb. 2, 7 p.m.
In 332 Michigan Union. Info. 769-2753 or 761-0590.
DRIVER'S EDUCATION-taught by Les. Women must have own car.
Info, call 665-0362.,
SONG WRITING-taught by Marge. This will be workshop which
will only meet on Sun., Feb. 13, 12:00 to 3:00. Room 332 Mich. Union.
GUITAR, BANJO, AND DULCIMER-taught by Betsy. First meeting
Thurs., Feb. 3, 7 p.m. 1510 SAB.*Info. 769-0757.
BUILDING AND PLAYING THE DULCIMER-taught by Sally and
Betsy. First meeting Feb. 3, 7 p.m. 1510 SAB.* For this class women
must buy their owns materials which will run about $5.00-$6.00.
COMPUTERS-taught by Carol. For info. call 668-6433 or 763-3116.
This course will cover understanding and programming computers.
SEWING-taught by Carol. For info. call 668-6433 or 763-3116.
PLANTS. Photography, collecting and preserving plants. Starts in
Spring. Call Ann, 665-4944.
WOMEN UTILIZING CONFLICT-taught by Jan and Gretchen. 4 ses-
sions in Feb. 1st meeting Tues., Feb. 1, 7:30, Room 332 Mich. Union.
This course will examine types of conflict situations women find
themselves in. Info. call 761-5896.
*Student Activities Building, Thompson and Jefferson
Michigan Union, South University and.South State
ALL CLASSES ARE FREE!!
General Information CALL -- 665-4944 or 769-5962

OW' sister arrested
Santa Clara County Sheriff deputies arrested Fania Davis, sister
of Angela Davis, after a demonstration outside the courthouse
where Angela is being tried.
GOV'T WORKERS INCLUDED:
Se-nate ex tends job
b i a s b e j u is i
acs bil ini Ctilon

"This government, to be pre-
cise," said Le, "would be com-
posed of personalities of various
political and religious tendencies."
The major religious groups in
South Vietnam are the Buddhist
and Roman Catholic communities.
Le also released the details of
the nine-point peace plan which
was handed to Presidential advis-
er Henry Kissinger at a secret
meeting with the North Vietna-
mese in Paris on June 26. Point
3 called for the Thieu govern-
ment to be replaced by "a new ad-
ministration standing for peace,
independence, neutrality and de-
mocracy."
This government would nego-
tiate with the Viet Cong's pro-
visional revolutionary govern-
ment "to settle the internal af-
fairs of South Vietnam and to
achieve national concord," the
hitherto secret plan said.
Such a position is not new from
the Communist side. In the seven-
point peace plan presented July
1, 1971, by Nguyen Thi Binh, dele-
gation leader of the Viet Cong in
Paris, Point 2 called on the United
States to stop backing the Thieu
government and, assuming this
would lead to its downfall, said:
"The political, social aild reli-
gious forces in South Vietnam as-
piring to peace and national con-
cord will use various means to
form "a broad thtee-segment gov-
ernment of national concord" to
organize general elections. A
cease-fire would take effect as
soon as the government of na-
tional concord was formed.
And in Saigon, Gen. William
Westmoreland, Army chief of
staff, said yesterday that North
Vietnam may launch a multi-
phase military campaign in South
Vietfnam next month.

After a 20-month study the FDA task force said there is evidence
of a potential human health hazard. Bacteria developed in animals WASHINGTON (P) - T h e Sen-
fed medicated feeds may be transferred to humans, hampering medi- ate yesterday defeated a Southern-
led move to continue the exemp-'
cal treatment of diseases. Lion of over 10 millicn state and'
The Animal Health Institute, representing 55 companies manufac- local government employes from

turing 90 per cent of the nation's feed additives, said food costs would
rise if antibiotics were banned entirely.
KING MAHENDRA of Nepal died yesterday and his son ascend-
ed the world's only Hindu throne as a divine-right monarch.
The new King Birendra Bir Bikram Sah Deva, pledged in a nation-.
wide broadcast to follow the modernization policies of his father and
asked his people to enhance Nepalese prestige through cooperation,
unity and good will.
TREAT YOURSELF to a MID-WEEK BREAK
Come to the

the lederal ban on racial and oth-
er discrimination in employment.
These employes now are ex-
cluded from coverage, but a bill
before the Senate would bring
them under the law. An amend-
ment by Sen. Sam Ervin Jr. (D-'
N.C.) to knock out this part of the
bill was rejected by a 59-16 vote.,
However, an equal-employment
bill already passed by the House
makes no provision to extend cov-
erage to state and local employes,
the largest class of persons n o w
exempt.
This and other differences will
have to be ironed out by Senate-
House conferees before any final
action by Congress on the legisla-
tion to strengthen the prohibition
against job discrimination ased

on race, religion, sex, or national
origin.
Senate debate on invoking t h e
bill began Jan. 19, and a vote will
be taken today on invoking t h e
Senate's anti-filiburster rule in an
effort to force the measure to a
vote.
If the initial move fails, further
attempts will be made to cut off
debate. But Majority leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont.) predicted it1
will not be easy at any time to,
get a two-thirds majority.
A key section of the bill would
give the Equal Employment Op-
portunity Commission power to is-
sue cease-and-desist orders to halt
job bias by private employers. Butl
in the case of state and ocal em-i
ployes, if it could not get volun-
tary compliance, it would refer
the cases to the Justice Depart-
ment for possible prosecution in:
the courts.f

recognized
bycountries
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan (P)
Diplomats in Rawalpindi believe
an avalanche of nations will : e -
cognize Bangladesh now that Pak-
istan has quit the British Com-
monwealth.
Foreign Secretary Sir Alec Doug-
las-Home said yesterday Britain
will recognize the emerging nation
of Bangladesh in the very t e a r
future.
He told the House of Commons
Britain greatly regrets the decis-
ion of President Zulfikar Ali Bhut-
to of Pakistan to quit the Com-
monwealth.
The Pakistan decision to leave
the Commonwealth was disclosed
Sunday by Bhutto after he got no-
tice that Britain, Australia a n d
New Zealand soon will establish
full relations with Banladesh,
formerly the eastern wing of Pak-
istan.
President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto's
decision Sunday was interpreted as
a face-saving measure, to express
displeasure with nations that re-
cognize. Bangladesh without act-
Suallysevering diplomatic relatirns
with them.
"We are prepared to have ex-
cellent bilateral relations with
Britain and other Commonwealth
countries," said Bhutto. le' said
the British move was being made
in "indecent haste" and that Brit-
ain should wait for its decision un-
til after he returns from the Peo-
ple's Republic of China. His China
trip began yesterday.
The IMichigan Daily, edited and Ma
aged by; students at the University o
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by, mail.
DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
7-9 P.M.
JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT
IN A FILMBY
CLAUDE LELOUCH

"ow;

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
Wed., Feb. 2
8-10 p.m.
4th Floor Rackhom
Hot chocolate and
cake for all

I

THE 1971-72 A new comedy
NEW PLAY :.by
PROJECT Danny ipmon
.;.:*. Dann Lipan .
Directed by HARVEY MEDLINSKY
(Winner of London Critics Award
for his staging of "Plaza Suite")
4 PERFORMANCES * Thurs.-Sun. Feb. 24-27

f ' ' I

r.x. . .
mow.
; ,.. ' :

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.

J11VI1laI+ IIIII

lit

kI ff-4;1:1111

your
kind
of place
.. it's the J Shop for young
men, it's a tops and bottoms
shop. Like bell jeans, soft
body-snug shirts, the newsiest
knits and great looking belts.
If it's new, now and individualistic,
it's here. You'll agree the
J Shop is your kind of place.
We planned it that way.

Cldude Lelouch who took
a particular look at love
in "A Man and A Wo-
man" takes a particular
look at c r i me in "The
Crook."
-Thursday-
"BILLY JACK"F

.,.
.o

Silent Movies
At

clii

*.i~%
f0 . Yii
p . * S

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