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January 26, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-26

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Thursday, January 27, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page 5evien

Thursday, January 27, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Jabbar

hits

34

In

win

over

Pistons

out to lunch
mort noveck

A new I.M., building

can- the dream happen?
HOUGH MOST current students will probably never get to use
the facility, it's finally beginning to look like Michigan will
get a new Intramural building.
The project was last proposed two years ago, but students
voted down a funding plan which would have increased their
fees. It has been dormant since that time. However, the Board
in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics reactivated it last night
when they turned the plans over to the Regents. So if the
Regenits are able to decide how to pay for the thing, construction
can begin.
All planning is completed for the project. They know how
much square footage is needed and how to lay it out. The
only thing left to do is make the financing arrangements.
Except that this is the hardest part of the project and will
probably stall proceedings. An adequate building will cost
$9,000,000. And this figure rises when the debt service is
added in.
Money is just as scarce as it was two years ago. It won't
be easy'to find enough and it would be easy to be pessimistic
about the project. However, the idea seems to have much more
backing than it did the last time it came up.
It's not just a bunch of kids that want to play basketball
who are pushing for the building. Both the University admin-
istration and the athletic department are on record as favoring
the proposal.
"It'sthe number one priority on campus," commented
Athletic Director Don Canham. "It's pretty obvious that
we're in bad shape for intramurals. The facilities are already
crowded and Waterman and Barbour have got to come down
or they'll be condemned soon. The need is now."
"I'm optimistic about a building," he continued. "There's too
many people in'favor of it now and if everybody pulls together
and does it properly We'll get it."
However there is still the problem of money. And it's not
just how to come up with such a sum. There is some confusion
as to who has to raise it. Two years ago it was decided that
students should assume a major portion of the burden and they
rpfused. The athletic department is responsible for maintaining
and operating the Intramural program, but the program is
funded by the University, so the Board isn't ready to pay for it.
Canham would like to see arrangements similar to those
that were made to construct Crisler Arena. He feels that his
department can maintain the physical plant and run the pro-
gram, but thinks that the University will have to fund the
initial construction. Student money will probably be neces-
sary, he says, but not for the whole building. The plan has
worked for the Arena and it has worked at Purdue and
Illinois where new intramural buildings have recently been
constructed with some student money.
But if student fees are going to be used, then the proposal
will have to survive a referendum. Canham thinks that demand
for the building is great enough that there will be no problems
this time, but the usual arguments like, "why should we pay
for a building we can't use?," will reappear.
Last time there was objection to the fact that some students
would pay for part of the building but graduate before its com-
pletion.
However, Canham feels that the majority of students support
the school's current athletic program. He realizes that some will
argue that football should pay for an I.M. building but argues
that, "there is a very small percentage of people that don't
believe in the present system. Besides, 24,000 students bought
football tickets, so we must be doing something right."
Hopefully he is right and whatever student funding is
required for the project will be supplied. It is true that foot-.
ball brings in a great deal of money to the athletic depart-
ment, but it is also true that it costs quite a bit to maintain
a winning football team. If money is diverted from the
varsity program the whole thing will collapse. So instead of
having a small surplus from football which can be used for
other purposes, you have no revenue at all.
Intercollegiate athletics can help pay for an I.M. program
but they can't do it all. It is unlikely that the state legislature
will agree to build their University constituents a new facility, so
if the students want it, they're going to have to contribute to a
new I.M. building soon.
NFL conference to
stud 'sudden death
DALLAS (P) - The chairman out the other team getting
of the National Football League's chance to have the be.ll.
competition committee says the Commissioner Pete Rozelle s
current method of "sudden death" in New Orleans during Sup
in the event of ties in playoff Bowl VI that, "I have always f
games will come under hard study that anytime one team can win
at the winter meetings in March the sudden death period witho
in Hawaii. the other team having an offe

Tex Schramm, general manager sive scoring opportunity is unfa
and president of the Dallas Cow- In the past, I have brought th
boys, says, "There is a fascination to the attention of the owners, b
to the sudden death element in thus far they have not acted1
overtime. This adds to the value correct it."
and importance of the field goal.
The big worry among NFL exec-
utives in an overtime game such
as the one that Kansas City and
Miami played is that a team will
win the toss, march into field goal'
territory, and make the kick with-

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Kareem Abdul Jab-
bar tossed in 34 points and Bob
Dandridge 23 as the Milwaukee
Bucks coasted to a 120-94 National
Basketball Association victory over
the Detroit Pistons last night.
The Bucks hit on 14 of their,
first 22 shots to take a 29-18 lead
after one quarter and never were
threatened the rest of the way as
Milwaukee collected its fourth vic-
tory in five games against the
Pistons this season.-
Jabbar, the league's top scorer,s
collected 28 of his points in the.
first half when the Bucks posted+
a 62-50 halftime lead. Then Mil-
waukee swelled its advantage to
91-70 after three quarters as Jab-:
bar and Dandridge continued to
find the range with ease.
Cams crunch
BOSTON - John Johnson and:
Beard combined for 32 second half+
points last night, leading the1
Cleveland Cavaliers to a come-
from-behind National Basketball
Association victory over the Bos-I
ton Celtics that snapped an 11-
game loss streak.

Cleveland trailed 60-46 at half-
time but the Cavs fought back in
the third quartes to cut the- deficit
to 82-76 at the end of the session.
Cleveland then scored three
straight baskets in the first min-
ute and a half of the final session
to tie the score.
Boston took back a four point;
lead at 94-90 but Cleveland then
siored eight straight led by Beard's
two steals to take the lead for
good in winning 112-108.
Beard led Cleveland's scorers
with 23 points and Johnson had 22.
Austin Carr and Dave Sorenson
earh added 16 and Sorenson also
had 15 rebounds.
John Havlicek and Jo Jo White
led Boston with 27 and 20 resper-
tively.
Bullets blitz
BALTIMORE-Center Wes Un-
seld. sank an inbounds pass with
one second left in overtime to give
the Baltimore Bullets a 115-114
victory over Buffalo in a National
Basketball Association game last
night.
Walt Hazzard hit two foul shots
with one second left to give the

sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
MICHAEL OLIN
Braves a 114-113 lead. The Bullets
then called time out and set up
the inbounds play with Gus John-
son throwing the ball to Unseld
breaking for the basket.
Supers smother
ATLANTA - Lee Winfield and
Don Smith sparked a fourth quar-
ter rally, leading the Seattle Su-
personics to a 131-119 National
Basketball Association victory over
the Atlanta Hawks last night.
Winfield scored 10 of his 17
points and Smith eight of his 24
in the final period as the Sonics
won going away in a game they
once were losing by 15 points.
* * *
Royals racked
PHILADELPHIA -Fred Carter
poured in 31 points, a season high,
to lead the Philadelphia 76ers to
a 113-102 National Basketball As-
sociation victory over the Cincin-
nati Royals last night.

The game was even until the
76ers took command late in the
third period. Carter and Dave
Wohl led an uprising that brought
the 76ers to an 85-80 edge as the
third period ended.
The 76ers quickly took a 102-91
edge in the final quarter and the
visitors could get no closer than
eight points the rest of the way.
Carter has hit season highs in
each of his last three games, scor-
ing respectively, 27. 29 and 31
points.
Archibald hit the 40-point mark
for the sixth time this season.
Rangers romp
NEW YORK - Jean Ratelle
scored two goals to grab a share
of the National Hockey League
scoring lead in helping the New
York Rangers to a 5-1 victory over
the Buffalo Sabres last night.
Ed Giacomih in the New York
nets lost his bid for a shutout in
the waning minutes of the second
period on Craig Ramsay's fourth
goal of the year.
* * *
Blues breeze
PITTSBURGH The St. Louis
Blues moved into third place in
the tight race for a playoff berth
in the National Hockey League
West by defeating the Pittsburgh
Penguins 2-1 last night.

-Associated Press
DETROIT PISTON FORWARD JIMMY WALKER (24) goes up for
a possible two in last night's 120-94 loss to the Milwaukee Buck4
in Detroit. Attempting to stop Walker are the Bucks' Tony Kim-
ball (7) and Kareem Abdul PJabbar (33).

--.r

I

SCORES
Louisville 77, St. Louis 59
St. Joseph's Pa. 75, Xavier, Ohio 63
Jacksonville 84, Florida State 82
Indiana St. 80, Ball St. 78, 2 of
Nebraska 64, Oklahoma State 63
Temple 76, George Washington 73
Virginia Tech 105, W. Virginia 104, 3 ot
St. Peter's N.J. 80, Iona 71
Rutgers 78, Delaware 73
Virginia 112, Johns Hopkins*70
Davidson 81, Princeton 74
Lafayette 91, Pittsburgh 78
Univ. of Detroit 77, Toledo 73
Citadel 85, Stetson 70
Penn 80, La Salle 66
Manhattan 111, St. Francis, N.Y. 75
Franklin 84, DePauw 80

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i'I
+i'

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MILWAUKEE'S KAREEM JABBAR (33) roadblocks Detroit Piston
forward Terry Dischinger in last night's National Basketball Asso-
ciation game. Bob Dandridge (10) drives around for the Bucks
in their 120-94 victory.

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
as taught by
Maharishi
Mahesh
yogi

SMa~jo league
Standings

Boston
New York
Philadelph
Buffalo
Baltimore
Atlanta
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago
Phoenix
Detroit
Los Ange
Golden St
Seattle
Houston
Portland

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L
34 18
29 20
iia. 22 29
13 34
Central Division
23 26
19 32
16 34
.i 15 34
Western Conference
Midwest Division
41 11
36 14
30 22
18 32
Pacific Division
les 42 7
tate 30 20
30 22,
19 33
12 41

FREE INSTRUCTIONS
POCKET BILLIARDS
TONIGHT 7-9 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION

Heavy Duty Steering
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Yesterday's Results
Cleveland 112, Boston 10s
Milwaukee 120, Detroit 94
Philadelphia 113, Cincinnati 102
Seattle 131, Atlanta 119
Baltimore 115, Buffalo 114, overtime
Chicago 117, Houston 108
Only games scheduled
Today's Games
Chicago vs. Golden State at Oakland
Only game scheduled
NHL
East Division
W L T 1tsGF

F {

Women: Taking Care of Each Other-
Taking Control Over Our Lives
ANN ARBOR WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER CALENDAR
JANUARY 29, SATURDAY: 10-12 p.m.-Orientation session for those
women who are about to go through training for counseling. ST. ANDREW'S
CHURCH, N. Division at Catherine.
JANUARY 31, MONDAY: 8 p.m.-MASS MEETING to create a semi-
permanent structure for ourselves and get backtogether with those women
interested in being involved on any level. 332 MICHIGAN UNION-Lounge
across from Women's Advocate Office. Follow the signs after turning left at
the Union's main desk. PLEASE COME IF YOU WANT TO BE WITH US!!

Presents
Alpha Tau Omega
All Campus Parly
SAT., JAN. 29

Boston
New York
g Montreal
~,Toronto
aDetroit
IVancouver
Buffalo

31 7 8
31 8 7
26 12 8
20 17 10
20 20 7
13 26 5
10 28 11
West Division

70
69
60
50
47
31
31

186
208
177
129
147
112
128
152
124
142
135
112
109

GA
102
104
127
127
152
1501
187
85
1001
190
156
150
193

I

Music by: HOT WATER
All the beer you can DRINK
Admission: $1.00 guys; $.10 girls

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Chicago 31 10 5 67
Minnesota 25 15 7 57
California 15 25 10 40
St. Louis 17 24 7 41
Philadelphia 12 26 5 33
Los Angeles 12 33 4 28
Yesterday's Results
New York 5, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1
Toronto at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Boston
Detroit at Buffalo
Minnesota at Montreal
Vancouver at Chicago
only games scheduled

A.T*O.

1415 Cambridge 761-1345
(1 block south of Hill on Olivia)

ECO NO-CAR
SKI WEEKEND SPECIAL

iREI TO H.ELP
ounselors, available through-
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CHURCH & CHANGE
SERIES OF WEEKEND MULTIMEDIA EVENTS
Media and conversations about Christianity and the churches in social change, sponsored by ARM,
Interfaith Coalition for Peace, Lutheran Student Chapel, Newman Assoc., Unitarian Church, Office of
Religious Affairs of University of Michigan.-
JANUARY 27-28-29 MINISTRY
PIER PAOLO PASOLINI'S
TEOREMA
with Terence Stomp, Anne Wiazemsky. A morally ambiguous yoing man's impact on the family of
an Italian industrialist. shown FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 4:00, 7:15, 9:30 p.m. SUNDAY at 3:00,
7:15, followed by a conversation with
DONALD DREW CRAIG HAMMOND CHARLES IRVIN
former minister of former minister of St. Mary's Roman Catholic
1 st Presbyterian Church Canterbury House Student Chapel
FEBRUARY 12-13 REPARATIONS
Reexamination of the theology, morality, politics and
programs of the Black Manifesto
GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW
Pier Paolo Pasolini's modern classic film, based firmly on Matthew's Gospel, played by non-profes-
sional actors, shot in Southern Italy. 136 mins. English subtitles.
SATURDAY matinee 3:00 p.m. Evening show at 8:00 p.m. Sunday matinee 3:00 p.m.
SUNDAY 8:00 p.m. conversation with
WILLIAM STRINGFELLOW MUHAMMED KENYATTA
attorney and lay theologian an author of the Manifesto
REV. DON POSTEMA REV. RALPH OFFORD
Christian Reformed Church First Church of God
HENRY C. BRYANT
vice-president of Black Economic Development League of Washtenaw County

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