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January 13, 1972 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 13, 1972

SAVE!
up to 33%%
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I

AT

FOLLET'S
Michigan Book Store
State St. at North U.

By BILL ALTERMAN
and JOEL GREER
Michigan's pucksters closed
out 1971 with a bang by defeat-
ing Western Ontario and Bowl-
ing Green to win the first an-
nual Flint IMA Tournament
(Dec. 28-29).
The twin killings were the
fifth and sixth victories in a row
for the Wolverines but the eu-
pheria lasted only as far as the
first series of the New Year
when the Icers found themselves
totally manhandled by Minne-
sota-Duluth (Jan. 7-8).
The tournament, Flint's first
exposure to collegiate hockey,
matched Bowling Green and
Windsor in one first round en-
counter while Michigan tangled
with Western Ontario in the
other.
Obviously accustomed to Can-
adian college rules, Windsor was
confused all night as Bowling
Green's slick passing g a m e
skunked the Lancers 11-0.

Win TM
Canadian rules differ from the
American variety in that they
include the center red line pro-
ducing a closer checking game.
Western Ontario, on the other
hand, plays many American op-
ponents and had little trouble
adjusting. But it was a case of-
a fired-up Michigan team that
made the difference as the Wol-
verines dumped the Mustangs
4-2, for the third time this sea-
son. The Icers built up a 4-0
lead before tiring half way
through the second period.
Bernie Gagnon scored twice
while Pat Donnelly and Rick
Mallette tallied once each.
The Michigan-Bowling Green
final was a natural champion-
ship set-up as the contest pitted
two contrasting teams, each
risking five-game w i n n i n g
streaks. Michigan, playing in its
fiftieth season, has featured a
tough-nosed hard-checking style
of play, while Bowling Green,
only in its third season has fa-

'It

1.

OMMONOMMMMMIM4

IA tourney; then

FIRST IT WAS DDT IN YOUR FOOD.
THEN MERCURY IN YOUR FISH.
NOW IT'S DEP IN YOUR BEER!
We don't mean to be alarmist, but if the government doesn't
care about what goes down your gullet, we do! First Fruits,
Ltd. was founded on the notion that you'd rather eat good,
pure, safe, healthy food like ours than your average carci-
nogen. We sell pure food exclusively, and it's mainly Euro-
pean, because that's what Europeans eat-pure food. We sell
you what comes from natural soils, sunshine and rain,
packaged and processed only to the extent of keeping it
wholesome.
First Fruits, Ltd. thinks you're ready to change your tastes,
to move up to healthy foods from around the world, to
beat the monotony of cafeterias, hamburgers, and pizza.
For $10.00 we'N ship you a package worth $10.00, crammed
full of sustenance. For $28.00, we'll ship you three monthly
packages, or give you back $18.00 if you don't like the
first. Each package will contain a selection of meats, jams,
candies, cheeses, crackers, and more; all the things yon
need to stay alive and be able to enjoy the first fruits of life.
. .------------.-........ ... -- ...-.---.---

drop

two

Michigan's Dave Strack named
new Arizona athletic director
The Michigan athletic department announced Tuesday that
Associate Athletic Director Dave Strack has accepted the post
of athletic director at Arizona.
Strack, 48, who has held the associate position since 1970,
after two years as business manager, will assume the new post
on February 15. "I'm realily thrilled," he said. "This is a great
opportunity for me."
Athletic Director Don Canham revealed that he had no im-
mediate plans for replacing Strack. However, he did point out
that in the interim Assittant Athletic Director Don Lund will
take over Strack's duties.
Strack, Wolverine basketball coach until 1968, posted a
career record of 113-89 while heading the cagers.
Behind the sharp-shooting of All-America Cazzie Russell a
he led his teams to a third place national ranking in 1964, and
the second spot in 1965 when the Wolverines lost in the finals
of the NCAA tournament to UCLA. His 1966 team was elim-
inated in the regionals.
b(I~tki cub
Weekend Trip To
Collingwood, Ontario-Jon. 21-23
MEETING: Fri., Jan. 14
at 7:00 P.M., 3529 SAB
or
Go to Ski Club Office (2nd fl. SAB)
Thurs., Jan. 13 or Tues., Jan. 18
SKI CLUB MASS MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 20, 1972
7:30 P.M. Union Ballroom

vored a strictly disciplined po-
sitional style.
Bowling Green scored first on
a beautifully executed play while
Jerry Lefebvre was in the pen-
alty box. After taking a pass-
out from Gord McCosh, Chuck
Gyles fired from the point to
beat a screened Karl Bagnell.
But the scrappy Wolverines
took advantage of two Falcon
lapses to grab a quick 2-1 lead.
Gagnon fired a shot from his
side of center vhich caromed
straight off the boards in front
of the Falcon net.
Michel . Jarry, who somehow
outmaneuvered the defense, was
all alone to bury the rebound.
Jarry scored again just min-
utes later as Paul-Andre Paris
intercepted a Falcon pass and
found the Quebec center open
again.
The remainder of the first
period was scoreless and like-
wise the second as great goal-
tending was turned in at both
ends.
Michigan finally broke the
drought late in the third period
as Punch Cartier converted re
rarely-used Pete Dunbar. Nor-
mally the fifth defenseman,
Dunbar was moved up to the
left-wing to help fill the void
left by Pat Donnely who came
down with the flu just prior to
the game. "This was the first
time he's (Dunbar) played for-
ward," declared Coach Al Ren-
frew, "and he did quite well."
With less than two minutes
left Bob Falconer clinched the
4-1 victory as he found the net-
ting with a hard wrist shot just
after the face off.
Duluth, alas, was to be an
entirely different story. The
Wolverines were clearly out-
played by Duluth both nights
and despite taking early leads
both times, the pucksters seemed
doomed to the inevitable. .
Harried Michigan goalie Karl
Bagnell had to make an incred-
ible 55 saves in the first night's
9-3 loss, and found himself in
much the same position in the
second game as he had to turn
back 48 shots in a 7-3 shellack-
ing.
And while Bagnell was con-
WCHA Standings

stantly under pressure from the
Bulldogs, the Duluth netmind-
ers could have gone to sleep, be-
ing required to make only 18
saves each night.
Friday night the Wolverines
drew first blood as Gary Con-
nelly converted on an intercept-
ed Bulldog pass moments after
the opening faceoff. But the
Bulldogs had control of the puck
for almost the entire period,
taking 18 shots to six for the
Wolverines.
The Bulldogs knotted the
score before the period was over
and then completely blew Mich-
igan off the ice with four goals
in the first 2:36 of the second
period. The Wolverines came
back with two quick goals of
their own but to no avail as the
Bulldogs' superior passing and

playmaking ability kept the
Wolverines on the defensive for
the entire game.
The script remained un-
changed the following night as
two Gagnon goals gave Michigan
a 2-1 lead at the end of the first
period. But then Duluth started
to find the range and racked up
five goals in the second period
to none for the Wolverines to
ice the game.
Again the Wolverines ap-,
peared as if they shouldn't have
even been out on the same ice
with Duluth as the Bulldogs
completely dominated play.
Some of the blame for Michi-
gan's poor showing, though ob-
viously not all, could be attrib-
uted to the poor condition of the
ice. Because of its construction
and size, the arena is unusually

warm and makes for a much
slower game.
Both teams of course had to
play on it but the assumption is
that Duluth is used to it. After
the first game, a dejected Coach
Renfrew claimed, "when you
play like we did it doesn't make
much difference."
* But Duluth mentor Terry
Shercliffe admitted, "There's no
way a team can come up here
and like this stuff we play on."
The double loss was a costly
one for Michigan as a single
victory would have meant four
points for the Wolverines, cur-
rently floundering in next to
last place in the WCHA. The
Wolverines are now 9-5 over-
all and 5-5 in conference. The
nine victories equals their en-
tire win total of last year.

4

*b

'V

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.HOME STATE

three
packages

Wisconsin
Minn.-Duluth
Colorado Col.
North Dakota
Denver
Notre Dame
Michigan Tech
Michigan State
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

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Pts
30
24
16
14
14
14
14
14
10
6

Here they are!
YES, FOLKS, featuring your very own copy of the 1971 edition of the Daily Libels, to have and to
hold, forever and always. That's right, from left to right in the front row we have three clods you'll
never want to run into, Froggie Alterman, Bobo Andrews, and Elliot "The Big E" Legow. And right
behind them are four of the worst football players in Libel history. The first two are Ann D. Golding
and the coach (blame him for it all) Weirdbeard Noveck. The last two are Sir Death Drukis and Bob
"Halavah" Halvaks. In the center, however, is that fine and upstanding All-American from Patchogue,
N.Y., Chip Papanek.
MICHIGAN SECOND:
Hoosiers take Big Ten Rela s

p $28.00

All packages are postpaid and1
include your ZIP Cedes.

insured to point of delivery. Please

I,

I

By CHUCK BLOOM
In Big Ten swimming, Indiana
dominates all. The Hoosiers show
no sign of relinquishing their hold
on the event as evidenced by their
performance in last Saturday's Big
Ten Relays.
With nine of the ten schools
competing, Indiana finished first
by a wide margin. Michigan was
tied for second with a surprising
Ohio State squad.
The Hoosiers took eight out of
12 events in their runaway vic-
tory. The Wolverines had one
bright moment though somewhat
tarnished. Indiana finished first in
the 400 medley relay but was dis-
qualified, g i v i n g second - place
Michigan the win. The Wolverines'
time of 3:31.8 established a new
meet record.
SCORES

Micihgan was handicapped by£
the absence of three of its top
swimmers. Senior Byron MacDon-
ald and junior Mike Whitaker weret
in Australia swimming for theI
Canadian National team and sopho-
more Augosto Gonzales was at his
home in Lima, Peru.3
An area of major disappointment
for the Wolverines was diving.
Expected to do well, Michigan
could finish no higher than third
and fourth in the three-meter and
one-meter e v e n t s, respectively.
Ohio State finished first in the
one-meter diving with Indiana, sec-1
ond, and Wisconsin placing third.
The three-meter event was won:
by Indiana followed by Ohio State,
and Michigan.
Ohio State showed surprising
power in taking three events; div-
ing, 200 free style relay, and the

800 medley relay.
Familiar names led Indiana;
names certain to be heard at the
Olympics. Mark Spitz, Mark Lam-
bert, Gamy Connelly, and Tom
Hickcox led the winning 400 free-
style team. NCAA record holder
Larry Barbiere anchored the vic-
torious backstroke team.
John Kinsella, the nation's top
swimmer, led the 1500 freestyle
squad that finished 21 seconds
ahead of second-place Wisconsin,
and 32 seconds in front of third-
place Michigan. Spitz and Kinsella
teamed to take the 800 freestyle
ahead of Michigan, again placing
second.
Overall, with a combination of
swimming at home and a clear
superiority. Indiana once again
reigned supreme in Big Ten com-
petition.

Professional League Standings

+ 6J
o'
retes e @ 9'Ge,
d ro' 4
Q'ata o' to 001
C, t e r~a

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Marshall 102, DePauw 76
Delaware 83, Gettysburg 82
Miami of Ohio 86, West. Mich. 64
North Carolina 81, Clemson 61
South Carolina 116, Manhattan 78
Toledo 78, Butler 55
Colgate 100, Rensselaer 82
Cornell 105, Rochester 98
N.C. State 85, Duke 58
Dartmouth 93, Boston Col. 88
Memphis State 82, LSU 65
Louisville 71, Dayton 64

New York
Boston
Montreal
Toronto
Detroit
Buffalo
vancouver
Chicago
Minnesota
California
St. Louis

27 6 7 w
27 7 6
23 10 7
19 13 10
17 18 '1
8 24 10
10 24 5
West Division
28 8 51
22 12 6
12 22 9
13 22 71

NHL
East Division
W L TP

Pts
61
60
53
48
41
26
25

GF
183
158
153
121
131
113
94
139
106
128
120

Philadelphia 12 21 7 31
Pittsburgh 11 23 7 29
GA Los Angeles 11 30 2 24
91 Yesterday's Results
88 Los Angeles 1, Toronto 1
109 New York 5, Chicago 5
111 Boston 2, Pittsburgh 2
132 Minnesota at California, inc.
163 Only games scheduled
138 Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo
76 New York at Buffalo
82' Los Angeles at Boston
174 Only games scheduled
149

96
101
93

128
129
170

61
50
33
33

d

In Welcoming The New Adults
the BAIYAT

';1
1

102 S. First

663-2401

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 30 16 .652 -
New York 25 18 .581 3%
Philadelphia 19 26 .426 102
Buffalo 13 50 .297 152
Central Division
Baltimore 19 23 .452 -
Atlanta 16 28 .364 4
Cleveland 15 28 .349 42
Cincinnati 12 31 .274 72
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
Milwaukee - 36 10 .782 -
Chicago 31 13 .712 4
Phoenix 26 19 .578 9%
Oetroit 17 28 .378 18%
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 40. 5 .888 -
Seattle 27 19 .578 13%
Golden State 25 19 .568 14%
Houston 15 29 .341 24%
Portland 11 35 .239 29Y2
Yesterday's Results
Boston 113, Chicago 112
Cincinnati 108, Los Angeles 107
Buffalo 111, Philadelphia 109
Atlanta 104, Milwaukee 102
Only games scheduled
Today's Games

Announces Every Thursday Night
after 9:30 P.M.
A YOUTH NIGHT
with the Iris Bell Adventure
rocking your minds

D

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