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April 12, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:Poge 12-Thursday, April 12, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Tanzanians, Ugandan
exiles take Kampala

CAR TER CLAIMS VICTOR Y FOR GUIDELINES
Truckers head back to work

(Continued from Page 1)
znia, promised a "rule of law" and
said Uganda's first elections since 1962
ould be held "as soon. as conditions
permit."
HE SAID he wants to "bring back to
the people of Uganda the good life they
oatce-knew." He declared, "There must
be no revenge."
,)n Washington yesterday, two dozen
anti-Amin Ugandans took over their
cuntry's embassy as the State Depar-
tibent disclosed that representatives of
IUgandan insurgents now in control of
Kampala had met with U.S. officials
list week.
Police said there was no violence in
t takeover.
-Swaps defeated Nashua in the 1955
kntucky Derby but the big Belair
Stud colt gained revenge in a match
race at Washington Park that Aug-
t.
v

The State Department said the
meetings with representatives of the.
Tanzanian-backed Ugandan insurgents
who now claim to have toppled the
government of Amin took place in New
York and Washington. One of the
Ugandans involved was Otema Ali
Madi, named today as the new gover-
nment's foreign minister.
THE FINAL assault on Kampala
began Tuesday afternoon after hours of
air, artillery, and rocket bombar-
dment. An American reporter who
marched into Kampala with the in-
vaders said only 25-30 Ugandans were
killed in the city. None of the invaders
died, the reporter added.
Many of the Ugandans, he said, ap-
parently were caught and beaten to
death by civilians.
Among the dead were a U.N. Official
from West Germany and his wife. Their
automobile apparently was struck by a
rocket.

From AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON - Truck traffic
across the nation began returning to
normal yesterday after agreement on a
new wage contract that the Carter ad-
ministration hailed as a boost for its
battle to curb inflation.
Union and industry bargainers an-
nounced tentative agreement late
Tuesday on a contract that industry of-
ficials said would boost labor costs by
about 30 per cent over three years - or
just over nine per cent a year com-
pounded.
BUT ADMINISTRATION officials
disputed that cost estimate, saying the
contract boosts wages and fringe
benefits by 26.5 per cent over three
years, according to their calculations.
After subtracting several increases
exempt from the guidelines, the ad-
ministration said the Teamsters were
in compliance with the program.
"The settlement is within the ad-
ministration's voluntary pay standar-
ds," President Carter's chief inflation
fighter, Alfred Kahn, said yesterday.
Industry officials concurred with the
administration that the package falls
within the guidelines.
WORD THAT the 10-day stoppage in
the trucking industry - a combination
strike by Teamsters members and an
industry lockout - was ending flashed
Tuesday night to union offices
throughout the country via the Team-
sters' own communications network.
The message moved even before the
tentative agreement on the new three-
year contract was announced.
Pickets immediately started hurling
away their signs and the companies
scrambled to regain business lost to
firms not involved in the dispute.
UNION PRESIDENT Frank Fit-
zsimmons refused to say whether he
thought the package fell within the
guidelines, leaving that to the gover-
nment. "I can't figure their arith-
metic," Fitzsimmons told reporters af-

ter the two sides settled Tuesday.
Chief industry bargainer J. Curtis
Counts added, "Amen."
The agreement must be ratified by
union members, a process that takes
four to six weeks. "I'm sure they'll be
satisfied with this agreement. At least I
hope so," Fitzsimmons said.
UNION OFFICIALS say the
possibility that members will reject the
pact is a remote one.
Carter's voluntary anti-inflation
ogram calls for a seven per cent an-
n al ceiling on wage and fringe benefit,
increases. That works out to 22.5 per
cent over three years with compoun-
ding.
However, the administration has
relaxed the standard twice to accom-

modate the Teamsters.
THE CONTRACT is considered a
crucial test of Carter's voluntary
guidelines because the Teamsters
traditionally set wage patterns for
other major unions that bargain later in
the year.
Meanwhile, union and industry of-
ficials met at Teamsters headquarters
here yesterday to complete final terms
for ending the longest trucking shut-
down in the nation's history.
The union called a selective strike
against 73 major freight carriers at
midnight March 31 after bargainers
failed to settle on a new contract.
Trucking Management Inc., the
bargaining arm for some 500 major

trucking companies, responded within
hours with a lockout - barring some
235,000 Teamsters from working.
THE WORK stoppage severely ham-
pered the auto industry, which was for-
ced to shut or slow assembly lines and
place thousands of workers on layoff
because parts normally delivered by
truck never arrived.
However, the impact on the rest of
the economy was barely detected.
Under the agreement, workers would
receive general pay increases totaling
$1.50 an hour over three years -80 cent
ts in the first year and 35 cents in each
of the next two years. A typical worker
averaged $9.75 an hour, about $20,000 a
year, under the old pact.

'U'0professor speculates on
the future options for Amin

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Mental Health Research Institute
SEMINAR SERIES presents
Bernice Graf stein
from Cornell Medical College
WILL SPEAK ON-.. -"Axonal Transport and Regeneration
In Goldfish Optic Axons"
THURSDAY, April 12 at 12:30 p.m. at the
Mental Health Research Institute
Room 1057

-,

(Continued from Page 1)
to reorganize its educational in-
stitutions.
MAZRUI, considered by Amin ap-
proximately eight years ago as his
possible presidential advisor, said
there are three possible choices Amin
may make after being driven from
Uganda's capital, Kampala.
Mazrui said Amin may flee directly
to Jinja, the most industrialized city in
Uganda, where he would be met by the
remains of his army and supporting
Libyan troops. Jinja is the site of a huge
dam which supplies all the electrical
power to Uganda, as well as supplying
one-third of the power to neighboring
Kenya.
"One of the fears we have," said
Mazrui, "is that Amin may blow up the
dam at Jinja. This destructive last ef-
fort will 6e worthy of his destructive

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regime."
ANOTHER possibility would be for
Amin to secretly escape to Sudan or
Zaire, where his ethnic compatriots
live. The four countries surrounding
and including Uganda, were not
established by the colonial powers ac-
cording to ethnic grouping, but by
facility of political division, said
Mazrui.
"If Amin flees to Sudan or Zaire,
there is the possibility of his further in-
terference," Mazrui added.
Mazrui also said the third avenue
would be for Amin to flee to a friendly
country such as Libya.
Kampala, now in the hands of the
UNLF, has announced the establish-
ment of a provisional government with
Prof. Yussufu Lule, former boss and
colleague of Mazrui, as president,
defense minister, and armed forces
chief.
THE OUTCOME of this "shadow
government" will be hard to predict,
Mazrui explained. "The UNLF is
ideologically and ethnically mixed," it
leans in many directions, and until now,
it has been united in the common cause
of ridding Uganda of Amin," he said.
There is a possibility of a split in
UNLF ranks because of its mix of
ideologies, including socialists,
capitalists, Marxists and monarchists,
but, according to Mazrui, "Prof. Lule is
a good conciliator."
Mazrui said one of the hopes of Ugan-
dans is that there will be a popular elec-
tion, but in the meantime, the UNLF
will have to set up a constitutional
assembly because Amin ruled by
decree without a constitution.
THE TAKEOVER of Uganda by Tan-
zanian and Ugandan exiles is the first

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time an independent African nation has
overpowered another.
"One big worry," said Mazrui, "is
that this virtual reconstruction of
government by another nation may
represent a dangerous precedent for
the independent African nations, even
though the Amin government deserved
to be overthrown."
According to Mazrui, another per-
spective focuses on the fate of Tan-
zania.
Mazrui said the Tanzanian troops,
having gained a feeling of their power
and "the taste of the heady wine of
governmental overthrow," will return
home without cause and increase the
possible threat of a military coup in
Tanzania.
Mazrui, who left Uganda because of
the political situation and his in-
creasing visibility as head of the
Political Science Department of
Makerere University in Kampala, may
be considered by Lule to help establish
the newly-formed provisional gover-
nment.
MAZRUI said he might go to Uganda
to help rebuild the educational system#
which has deteriorated under Amin's
rule. "The rule of Amin was partly anti-
intellectual and began with the disap-
pearance of the university president.
There is only one university in Uganda,
so educators are very visible a$'
national figures," Mazrui said.
"I would consider the possibility of
returning to Uganda for a couple of
years or so,"he said.
In addition to Mazrui's position at the
University, he is the recently-elected
President of The African Studies
Association of the United States and a
Vice-President of The International
Congress of African Studies.
Judge says
Regents
may move
meeting
Continued from Page i)
may enter, he suggested several
methods of allocation, such as drawing
lots, or granting a certain number of
places to representatives from groups
desiring to attend the meeting.
The Regents obtained a court order
last month which allowed them to meet
behind closed doors after a WCCAA
disruption forced the Board to recess
three times. The protesters were
demanding that the Regents put the
South African divestment issue on the
April agenda. The court order was
revoked eight days later.
WCCAA members voted last
night-as they did last week-to ex-
clude the reporter present at their
meeting from the discussionof strategy
for next week's Regents meeting.
Members said an edited version of the
proceedings would be provided to the
press later.
INSTANT
CASH!
WE'RE PAYING
$1-$2 PER DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS
IN GOOD SHAPE.

KQ flI

I ( l hR ~AST A N L E bby ECIA E
and others IN CONCERT

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TUESDAY

APRIL 24

8:00 pm

CRISLER ARENA
Reserved seats are priced at 12.50 and 10.00
Tickets go on sale 10:00 am Friday April 13

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