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April 08, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-08

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10-Sunday, April 8, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Women discuss Right to Life

(Continued from Page 1)
ns. "He could be some guy in your
h. class who asks for the notes, so
et him in (to your apartment)."
>men learned ways to keep aware
>s'sible attackers and what to do if
d Yelling "fire", pointed out one
ian, is more effective than simply
ahing because people tend to
re screams. Cries of "rape" tend to

scare people away because they fear
for their own safety and don't want to
get involved.
Appropriately, the rape discussion
was followed by a self-defense
workshop. Women were instructed to
use positive thinking and force when
faced with a forceful attack. They also
practiced escaping from possible at-

Men claim women s-lib
movement closed minded
(Continued from Page 1) you move," Harper said.

tackers.
SANDY SILBERSTEIN, a Women
Studies TA, gave an amusing, but
thought-provoking talk on sexism in
language. "There are 1,000 sexually
derogatory words for women and about
100 for men. The ones for males aren't
so bad. Terms that start off as male
become broader." For instance, one
word for a male prostitute is hustler.
Hustler has grown to mean a hard
worker and applies to both men and
women.
The afternoon continued with a
presentation and film by the Ann Arbor
Women's Health Collective. Women
broke up into groups to examine them-
selves with speculums and to learn how
to maintain "self-health". Self-health is
getting to know what is normal with
one's body, the women were told, and
being able to see if something's wrong
without always being at the mercy of
gynecologists.
Today is the final day of the sym-
posium. Workshops begin at 10 in the
morning, on Lesbianism, Minority
Women, Domestic Violence, and
Women and the Law.

specify ahead of time particular
es to be addressed. Much of the
ee-hour discussion was directed
ard problems with sex roles and
ationships between males and
ales. ' .
everal members of the group in-
ed that despite much progress on
.part of the movement, fundamental
roles are still ingrained into mem-
s of today's society.
THAT'S ONE of the things about the
nen 's liberation movement to alter
present sex roles, and it's not hap-
iing," Huck said.
'he, seminar participants criticized
lack of honesty in male/female
ationships created by these roles.
I don't understand what's wrong
h coming out and saying, 'I don't like
roles we're playing in this
uation.' You can't think they
omen) are going to be able to tell
w you feel about them) from how
edpse MA
srzz

Several members of the group said
they felt the movement provides
women with a common bond men lack.
"I really feel a lot of jealousy of women
as far as a sense of community is con-
cerned," Harper said.
The meeting was held in conjunction
with the Symposium on Women's Issues
taking place in East Quad this
weekend.

AFSCME ratifies contract

Dily Photo by LSA UDELSON

(Continued from Page 1)
meeting went smoothly, according to
Newman. "There were a few radicals,
but we expected that," he said. The
"radicals" referred to by Newman
were members of the Membership Ac-
tion Committee, a vocal minority in the
union that accused the bargaining team
of "selling out" the union to the Univer-
sity.
DOR EVENTS
~G '7-9

Both bargaining teams said they
were pleased with the terms of the con-
tract. Union officials expressed
satisfaction with the agreement, saying
it provided "the bottom line" the
workers needed to live on. John Forsyth
leader of the University bargaining
team, said he "was surprised that so
many voted against the contract"
because he felt "it's a good contract for
all the parties involved."
The agreement, which expires April
21, 1981, is scheduled to be signed Mon-
day morning at 11 a.m. The final set-
tlement was the product of nine weeks'
of "good, hard bargaining sessions,"
according to Forsyth.
AFSCME's previous contract had ex-
pired March 20, but the terms of that
agreement were extended for two
weeks by a vote of the membership.
The new contract will be retroactive to
March 21 of this year.

A YOUNG GUEST at yesterday's carnival tests her aim in pie throwing while a Phi Delt (at right) helplessly awaits the.
result.
Orphans frolic at Phi Delt fair

By BONNIE JURAN
Eight-year-old Todd, when
questioned as to what he enjoyed most
about the carnival, replied instantly,
"the piano". But, after a moment of
thought, he decided it was actually the
pie toss, and, squealing with laughter,
said, "I threw pies and they went in the
guys' faces!" He then demonstrated
enthusiastically, flinging his arms out,.
just how he flailed pies at his targets.
Todd was only one of about 40 or-.
phans invited to join in festivities
yesterday provided by the brothers of
Phi Delta Theta.
THE PHI DELTS, together with the
women of Kappa Alpha Theta, staged a

* TAJ MAHAL'
S#ecialGuest ElizabethCotton
STEVE GOODMAN
Tue. April 17 8PM Power
Tickets$7 50 Reserved

kiddie carnival which included a pie,
toss, a game of pin-the-tail-on-the-
donkey, a three-legged race, plus car-
toons, a magician, and an outdoor ob-
stacle course composed simply of large
silver barrels and brightly colored ban-
ners.
It was unquestionably a day of fun
and enjoyment for both the little kids
from St. Vincent de Paul Sarah Fisher
Home for Children as well as the big
kids from Phi Delta Theta and Kappa
Alpha Theta.
A few of the Thetas were dressed in
clown suits and the rest of the Thetas,
along with all of the kids, had their
faces painted with bright colors. The
decorations and equipment inside the
house and outside on the lawn used for
the games were simple and inexpen-
sive, yet the obvious fun the kids had
surpassed anything money could have
bought.
JOHN KRAUS, a member of Phi
Delta Theta, explained that "because
we don't make any profit on the car-

nival, the money spent on the carnival
is our own. This year we were only able
to spend around $100 but next year we
hope to raise some extra money so we
will be able to rent some real carnival
equipment."
Approximately 35 students live in the
red brick fraternity house on the corner
of Sbuth University and Washtenaw.
The frat sponsors a community service
project at least once a month. The Phi
Delt tradition, was this month's project
for the orphans.
The kids, aged eight to 12, had quite a
time. During the soundless cartoons,
which included Yogi Bear and
Huckleberry Hound, the Phi Delts sup-
plied some impromptu sound effects,
but many of the kids were too busy en-
joying the individual attention they
received to watch the screen.
The Delts and the Thetas went out of
their way yesterday to make sure that
the kids from St. Vincent de Paul's
were thoroughly entertained, and,
judging from the smiles and the
laughter that filled the air, it is clear
that they succeeded.

r

4

CRUSADERS
Stix Hooper 4a.a'iw Joe Sample
Robert Popwell illyIDogers-WiltonFekler

WEDNESDAY APRII 18
8PM HILL AUDITORIUM
T rkAts 750.6.50.5.50

Department of Romance Languages
SUMMER STUDY
IN EUROPE
(France and Spain)
INFORMATION MEETINGS
Tuesday, April 10-4:00 PM
Third-Year French: Fourth Floor Commons of MLB
Second-Year Spanish: B 110 M L B
Third-Year Spanish: BlMl MLB
For information about Second- Year French or other questions,
come to 4108 MLB (764-5344)

Costello disc bids
farewell to seventies

THE
JOHNNY CASH
SHOW
THURSDAY APRIL 19
8PM HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets$8.50, 7.50,6.50

(Continued from Page 1)
PERHAPS TO further show off his
complexity, the artist has included a
far more subdued version of "Accidents
Will Happen" on the "Live at
Hollywood High" EP that comes with
the early pressings. Without a zippy
arrangement to counteract his mour-
nful vocals, lines like "It's the damage
that we do and never know,/It's the
words that we don't say that scare me
so ..." are far more hard-hitting.
Costello is smart enough to avoid get-
ting trapped in successful formulas. His
first record, My Aim Is True, was a
tremendous hit critically, if not com-
mercially, but he nevertheless aban-
doned its stark pub-rock sound for the
lush, raving guitar-and-keyboards six-
ties pop of This Year's Model. And now,
he has replaced those simple sounds
with a more esoteric mix of drums,

bass, keyboards, and (very little)
guitar. Thus, it's not surprising that
"Green Shirt" sounds a little bit like
Kraftwerk with its (seemingly) syn-
thesized percussion and regular though
infrequent bursts of rapid-fire drum-
ming. For the first time, Costello's
music is just as strange and unpredic-
table as his lyrics; though fun, it adds
tok the overall confusion.
"Party Girl" starts off as a rather
simple ballad ("See the party girls look
me over, /See them leave when the par-
ty's over . . ."), but becomes more
chaotic as Costello's indecision
becomes more clear ("I don't Want to
lock you up and say you're mine,/Don't
want to lose you or say good
bye . ."), finally ending with a direct
cop from Abbey Road as he sings, "I
can give you anything but time. .."

,,_

DAN FOGELBERG \4P
Sur dQo April21
8PM Hill Auditorium
Tickets$ji6 ,6.50

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BAXND FNFURING JIojI A
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SPCAGUEST
} LARRY CORYELL
WEDNESDAY MAY 2
8PM HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets$6.50,5.50,4.50
GILBERTO GIL.
MoNdAy MAY7 LydiAMENdds5shN 8PM
Tickets$3.50Reserved

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