100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 07, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Saturday, April 7, 1979-The Michigan Daily
No rate increase for

Wilkenson discusses crime laws

Northwoo4
By PATRICIA HAGEN
The University Family Housing
Rate Committee has recommended to
the Housing Division that rates for the
1672 family housing apartments not be
increased for the 1979-80 year.
The committee of residents and
Housing officials reported that an in-
crease in rental rates is unnecessary
because of the recent refinancing of
Northwood II, one of the six family
housing units.
"IT'S PRETTY surprising in this
period of high inflation," commented
Norm Snustad, associate director of
Housing. Last year family housing
rates jumped 13 per cent despite
vigorous opposition by residents.
Without the refinancing, Snustad
projected that a 5.3 per cent increase
would have been necessary.
The Housing Division is currently
reviewing the committee's recommen-
ation and will present a final recom-
mnmdation to the Regents at the April 19
n ,eting. Only slight modifications of
_ e committee's list of recommen-

d housing
dations are planned by Housing of-
ficials before presentation to the
Regents.
SNUSTAD EXPECTS the recom-
mendation to be approved but he
cautioned, "We don't presume anything
until the Regents meet."
The existing bond on Northwood II
will be paid off and the unit will be
refinanced by a federal loan from the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) for the energy
conservation program. HUD is curren-
tly reviewing the loan application and
Snustad said he fully expects it to be
approved.
"Refinancing Northwood II allows us
to use money that previously went to
bond payments for capital im-
provements," explained Snustad.
THE MONEY previously required for
bond prepayments will be contributed
to the General Student Resident Reser-
ve (GSRR) account. Each University
housing unit contributes to the GSRR
which is a general fund used for capital
improvements and maintenance on all
units.

By JULIE BROWN
Noting that all-encompassing
anti-crime legislation "is going to
inherently lead to bad law,"
Frank Wilkenson, executive
director of the National Commit-
tee Against . Repressive
Legislation (NCARL), spoke
yesterday on the problems of
reforming criminal law.
Wilkenson, interviewed at the
Guild House, pointed to the
Criminal Code Reform Act
(Senate Bill 1437) as the primary
example of such faulty
legislation. The bill, which was
passed by a 72-15 vote in the
Senate last year, was defeated by
the House Judiciary Subcommit-
tee on Criminal Justice. Accor-
ding to Wilkerson, the House sub-
committee recommended "a
step-by-step approach," instead
of "an omnibus bill of some 700
pages."
ACCORDING TO Wilkenson,
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.), intends to introduce a bill
this year similar to the one that
was defeated. Wilkenson said
Kennedy is waiting for the House
subcommittee to act, in order to
insure passage of the bill he in-
troduces.
Wilkenson produced a letter,
dated Dec. 15, 1978, which Ken-
nedy sent to Rep. Robert F.
Drinan, chairman of the House
subcommittee, urging passage of
the bill. According to Wilkenson,
the letter "shows Kennedy's
complete moral turpitude.
"Kennedy is playing a game,
and wants any kind of bill,"

Wilkenson said. "We'll end up
with either 1437 or something
worse."
ACCORDING TO Wilkenson,
Kennedy, who is the chairman of
the Senate Judiciary Committee,
"began in 1975 to build fences
with the ultra-right." Wilkenson
said that Kennedy did this
because of his interest in ob-
taining the chair of the powerful
Senate committee.
"This bill is aimed at expan-
ding every federal law," Wilken-
son said. He cited several areas
which would be affected by the
legislation, including "things that
would affect students."
Wilkenson said that such a bill
could have a definite effect on
student demonstrators. "Under
1437, even ifhno demonstration
takes place, holding a planning
meeting could subject all those
present to prosecution under the
conspiracy clause," he said.
"Any speaker could also be
prosecuted for the new crime of
Ssolicitation."
WILKENSON SAID false in-
formation given to the police.
during a demonstration, "gould
result in charges of fraud and
misrepresentation."
According to Wilkenson, the
bill would also damage freedom
of the press. "A journalist inter-
viewing demonstrators could be
prosecuted for obstructing
justice," if he or she refused to
give notes to law enforcement of-
ficials, he said. "Such a bill would
freeze the Stanford decision into
law," Wilkenson said.

,'

TOMORRQW

t*.

aN f3om S

Daily photo by DAN OBERDORFER

FRANK WILKENSON, executive director of the National Committee Against
Repressive Legislation (NCARL), discussed the implications of the Criminal Code
Reform Act (Senate Bill 1437) at the Guild House last night.

Am

r

I
MSU, ILLINOIS ALSO SEARCHING:
Other 'U's need presidents too

What:

The area's top businesses offering
merchandise and services
at 50% OFF!!!
U of M Track and Tennis Building
(State & Hoover)

Where:
When:

April 8th - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

SPORTS EQUIPMENT " PLANTS * WICKER FURNITURE " RUNNING SHOES
" DOWN JACKETS " UNIQUE CANDLES " ART PRINTS " STAINED GLASS LAMPS *
ORIENTAL IMPORTS * JEWELERY " WICKER BASKETS " LEVI'S * POTTERY
* WATER BEDS " PHOTO PORTRAITS " AQUARIUMS " FURNITURE ",
CLOTHING * HEALTH CLUB MEMBERSHIPS * T-SHIRTS
" LEATHER GOODS * AND MORE AT 50% OFF!
8 HOURS OF SALES MADNESS!
FREE ADMISSION!
AMERICAN RETAIL PROMOTIONS. INC

(Continued from Page 1)
professional staff members, the
president of the Alumni Association,
the president of the Illinois Foundation
(the school's fund-raising body, and
Wagner.
Corbally is still serving as president
of Illinois but he says he intends to
leave by Sept. 1. In contrast to the
details of the process at the University,
no details of how the final candidates
for his job will be interviewed have
been made public.
One other characteristic seems to
prevail in the presidential search - an
emphasis on secrecy. University of
Illinois officials rival their Michigan
counterparts in their ability to be close-
mouthed about candidates and the
details of the process."
THE REASON for that secrecy may
be found in examining the presidential
search in East Lansing, where, many
believe, information leaks have created
havoc with Michigan State University's

attempt to find a permanent president.
When MSU's seventeen-member
selection committee presented its four
nominees to the university's Board of
Trustees in December, all four names
were published in the MSU student
newspaper. The four - Charles Bishop,
president of the University of Arkan-
sas, Henry Koffler, vice-president for
academic affairs at the University of
Minnesota, James Norton, visiting
chancellor at Case Western University,
and George Christensen, vice-president
for academic affairs at Iowa State
University - were among those inter-
viewed by the trustees in January, but
no selection has been made.

"Whether or not that (leaks) offends
other persons the Board might want to
consider, I don't know," said Michigan
State Trustee Chairman John Bruff.
But Bruff added, "The president of a
university, cannot afford to have it
known that he's looking for a job
someplace else. I think there's no
question of that."
In order to find that person, the
trustees may adopt a proposal made by
MSU selection committee chairman
Robert Barker that a subcommittee -
consisting of four selection committee
members and four trustees - be for-
med. While Bruff said that suggestion is

intended to provide "more interaction
between trustees and the selection
committee in the search and interview
process," many believe the measure is
meant to plug information leaks.
As its search drags on into a second
year, one bright spot at Michigan
State may be the work of interim
president Edgar Harden. Harden took
over in January 1978 for Clifton Whar-
ton, who became president of the State
University of New York, and is doing "a
hell of a job" according to Bruff. Har-
den was reportedly offered a per-
manent presidential position, but
refused it. Bruff refused to comment on
that subject.

Students receive high honors

r-
Freemited Salad JBar".
val-- & m_ 1t)

(Continued from Page 1)
And then there are the James B.
Angell Scholars who collected nothing
but A's for two or more consecutive
terms. More than 100 undergraduates
managed to earn straight A's for three
Student Winners
Four student winners were picked in.
the 1979 Henry M. Campbell Moot Court
Competition at the University's Law
School.
The winners were: James Wallack of
4836 S. Irving Ave., Minneapolis,
Minn.; Lawrence Wiethorn, 904 Peb-
blebrook Lane, E. Lansing, Mich.; Ed-
win Mason, R.R. 3, Macomb, Ill.; and
Mark Erzen, 931 Bartlett Terrace,
Libertyville, Ill.

terms, but only six students were cited
for perfect grades over seven
semesters.
More than 200 freshpersons, the top
five per cent in their class, were asked
to stand and will receive books to
recognize their membership in the
Branstrom Prize group.
AMONG THE hundreds of students
cited in various categories, Robert
Vishny, a junior in the Honors College,
was honored with the first annual Otto
G. Graf Scholarship. Vishny, who
comes from Lincolnwood, Illinois, ear-
ned the award in the eyes of the LSA
Scholarship Committee by raking up a
straight-A transcript while majoring in
philosophy, economics, and
mathematics.
In her keynote address, Prof. Marilyn
Mason of the Music School suggested

three rules for artistic success:
" Honors are "terrific", but only
sustained effort will produce continued
rewards;
* Perseverance and persistance are
keys; and,
* Belief in oneself is another.
Mason, head of the organ department
and a world-traveling keyboard vir-
tuoso, held up Verdi, Beethoven, and
Milton as artists who exemplify the
ability to "stick to it,' since each had to
overcome a tremendous problem,
either of age, deafness, or blindness.
Interim President Allan Smith
focused on the negative effect of
decreased federal spending on
education in a speech. "If the tendency
to reduce public funding of higher
education persists or magnifies,"
Smith said, society will suffer.

Roxie Music triumphs in Detroit

.,

i Continued from Page 51
leading a fascist takeover with his rock
'n' roll songs suddenly seemed possible.
But as the show progressed, Man-
zanera, Mackay, and Tibbs began to
run around the stage like madmen, and
Ferry even vacated his central position
of authority a few times. Everyone was
clearly having a great deal of fun.
THE FIRST half of the show was
good, although not exceptional. The
band mixed new songs like "Trash,"
"Still Falls The Rain," and "Ain't That

So" with older tunes such as "Out of the
Blue," "Mother of Pearl," and "Song
For Europe," but as good as the
material was, there weren't many
sparks in the air.
Things really started to click with.
"Stronger Through Thd Years,"
another new number. The loose,
vibrating structure of this superb song
gave the band members ample of space
to improvise in. Manzanera led off with
the kind of solo that made him a guitar
legend a long time ago; for the first

time in the show, he evoked the lyrical
beauty of his second solo album, 801
Live. Skinner took over with a sensitive
keyboard part that fed right into a
lovely oboe solo from Mackay. But
Mackay was playing a different song!,
With no break in continuity, the band
had shifted from "Stronger Through
the Years" to "Ladytron."
The rest of the show passed by at the,',
speed of light, with the band racing
from "In Every Dream Home A Hear-
tache" to "Love Is The Drug" and then
to a hard, cynical "Editions of You."
They came back twice to do encores, of-
fering first a splendid "Do The Strand"
and then a show-stopping (as indeed it
did) "Re-make/Re-model."
The concert opened with a short set
by the king of recycled rockabilly,
Robert Gordon. Gordon's albums are
marginal efforts marked only by a few
genuine humdingers ("Red Hot,"
"Flying Saucers Rock 'n' Roll," "Rock
Billy Boogie"), but at least he has the
support of a competent band in the
studio. With the exception of guitarist
Chris Spedding, who's played with Eno,
John Cale, Carla Bley, and individual
Roxy members before, Gordon's
tonrincr hand is decidAdlv qpennd-rate

YO U-

Ponderosa is having a fabulous fish fry. For $2.49 you can
enjoy all the filet of sole you can eat, plus a piping hot baked
potato or french fries, and warm roll with butter. Plus unlimited
vists to our salad bar. *Free refills on coffee, tea and soft drinks,
too. The Fabulous Fish Fry at Ponderosa. Catch it, all day...
every day.

can enjoy your
SUMMER
break!

_

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan