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January 12, 1979 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-12

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 12, 1979-Page 9
WOMEN FACE THREE BIG TEN FOES

Cagers anticipate tough weekend

..-

By LIZ MAC
The Michigan women's basketball team is a busy
group of athletes these days, and the next few days
are a good example.
Tonight the cagers meet Wisconsin at Crisler
Arena, followed by Indiana on Saturday, and Ohio
State on Monday. Coach Gloria Soluk, however, is not
worried about her team being overworked.
"I don't feel it will hurt us," she said. "Number
one, we're playing at home. Number two, we have a
good bench.
"Since we want to play Big Ten schools, we have to-
be available to play Friday or Saturday," she ex-
plained. "We're not pleased with the way we are
scheduled, but we made concessions by having home
games."
Though they lost their last outing to a tough Dayton
team, the Wolverines have won seven of their last

nine games. The team is strong offensively, led by
sharpshooter Diane Dietz with a 19.6 points per game
average. Other leading scorers are Katie McNamara
with 17.0 and Abby Currier with 12.2. McNamara also
holds the highest game total thus far this season, a 28
point effort against Grand Valley.
Leading the team in rebounds are Currier, Penny
Neer, and Yvette Harris. Harris contributed the team
high of 18, also against Grand Valley.
Considering the offensive phase of the game, the
young team has shown itself to be a contender. "We
haven't had to worry about offense," said assistant
coach Marge Plotzke.
"We're really pleased with our progress despite the
setback a few days ago," said Soluk, referring to the
cagers' 90-66 loss to Dayton. "We weren't prepared
for such a good Dayton team. Coming off a 40 point
victory (over Northern Michigan two days before),
we were a little flat. But we learned a lesson."

Wisconsin will try to put a stop to the Blue offejise
with "a good man-to-man," according to Soluk. The
Badgers are 4-2 and were third in the midwest last
year.
The Wolverines will have their hands full when they
take on a strong Indiana team on Saturday. "Indiana
is the best defensive team in the Big Ten," said Solul
"They play very aggressive defense. But we'll- be
ready for them."
The team hosts Ohio State on Monday night,
Looking ahead, the outcome of these Big Ten contests
may be an important factor in determining seeding
for the Big Ten Tournament at Indiana in February.,,
The team then travels to Northwestern on Thur-
sday.
All home games are at Crisler. Starting times fdt
the upcoming games are 7:00 tonight, 2:00 Saturday
and 7:00 Monday. ;

NO. 2 CONTENDERS TO FIGHT SA TURDAY
Heavyweight Knoetze gets OK

MICHIGAN'S DIANE DIETZ goes up for a jump shot against Dayton's Pat
Hoffman in Monday's action at Crisler. Dietz went on to lead the Wolverines with
26 points in the 90-66 loss. The play plays Wisconsin tonight at Crisler at 7:00.
Aili ng gymnasts host
Big Ten tournament

By DIANE SILVER
No matter how encouraging a team's
progress is, even the smallest injuries
can turn everything around, especially
for a team whose performers require
the skill and precision of gymnasts.
Although they are not part of the
routine game plan, injuries have
created unexpected obstacles for
Michigan's men's gymnastics team.
All-arounder Nigel Rothwell's sprained
thumb will limit his performance to
floor exercise, vault and pommel horse
in the Big Ten Invitational this
weekend.
"My thumb feels fine now, but I don't
want to push it," said Rothwell. "I'm
going to take it easy for another week,
and then I should be able to swing on the
other events (rings, high bar and
parallel bars)."
A sprained wrist will keep pommel
horse specialist John Rieckhoff from
appearing in the Wolverines' first home
meet of the season, and a swollen knee
will prevent Doug Zahour from perfor-
ming in floor exercise and the vault.
Zahour will be limited to competing
only on high bar.
These injuries have created an unfor-
tunate setback for the tumblers. "The
guys get slowed down in their
progress," said Rothwell. "It's kind of
disappointing."
If it's any consolation at all, no team
points will be kept in the meet featuring
gymnasts from Eastern Michigan,
Western Michigan, Indiana, Michigan

State and Ohio Stae. Only individual
scores will be tallied, so each school
will be allowed an unlimited number of
For more sports,
see pages 10 and 11
entries, instead of the usual 12.
"It gives the exhibition guys a chance
to swing a little," said Michigan coach
Newt Loken. "It's a good opportunity
for the guys who don't usually compete
to see how they stack up against
everyone else," said Ohio State coach
Mike Willson.
The compulsory competition begins
at 8:00 p.m. on Saturday. Optionals
take place on Sunday at 10:00 a.m.
followed by individual' finals at 2:30
p.m. All competition will be at Crisler
Arena.

By The Associated Press
ORLANDO - A federal judge yester-
day restrained the U.S. government
from revoking a visa for South African
boxer Kallie Knoetze, paving the way
for him to fight in Miami Beach on
Saturday.
U.S. District Judge Norman C. Roet-
tger said after hearing arguments that
he was acting in line with case law
decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals in
his own Fifth U.S. Judicial District.
"YES, THIS means that my client is
going ahead with the boxing match on
Saturday. A call is just now being made
to CBS in New York informing them of
the decisign," said Knoetze's attorney,
Michael J. Ryan.
The television network has the rights
to the nationwide telecast of the Knoet-
ze fight with Bill Sharkey of New York.
Knoetze is the No. 2 heavyweight in
rankings by the World Boxing
Association.
Ryan was asked if Knoetze was
taking a risk by fighting without a visa
on Saturday since he would be deported
if he lost his case on Jan. 22.
"IF ,WE LOSE on the merits, the
issue would be academic since he would
be deported. But he would have been
deported if he fought without a visa and
didn't seek this hearing," Ryan said.
Ryan had argued that his client had
not been granted a hearing on the

government's revocation order, which
was issued on the basis that the South
African had committed a crime in his
country that was equivalent to a felony
in the United States. Such a crime is
grounds for revocation of a visa.
Before his decision, the judge said,
"The key question ... is whether he
has a right to a hearing if the visa was
revoked."
HE THEN read case law that he said
provides for such a hearing and said
that one had not been granted.
The judge did not rule on a second
point raised by Assistant U.S. Attorney
Peter Nimkoff: that not only had
Knoetze's visa been revoked, but he had
been denied a type of work permit
needed to earn money in this country.
Roettger issued the temporary
3C Pr Copy
at the Paper Cae
Michigan Union
-next to U-Cellr
665-8654

'HEWLETT hp PACKARD

Demonstration

Thursday, Jan. 11-Friday, Jan. 12
10:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.
MR. CHUCK PALM, factory representative from Hewlett Packard, will be at
Ulrich's Books to demonstrate and answer your questions about Hewlett-
Packard Calculators.

U LRICHS"
Bookstore
549 East University Ave.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Phone 662-3201

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There's more to life
than playing tennis,.

. .

ARTHIUR
America's top
speak on

FISHE, one of
tennis players, will

CREERS IN
BUSINESS
Monday, January 15
10:30 a.m.
in Michigan Union
Pendleton Room

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