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March 29, 1979 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-29

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Page 12-Thursday, March 29, 1979-The Michigan Daily

A Masters Degree in,
RADIATION PROTECTION"/
at the University of Michigan
OpportunitIes Available for:
-Financial support for qualified graduate students
-Research in radiation desimetry and radiation biology
-highpaying, interesting jobs in a growing profession in
which the demand for graduates far exceeds the supply.
APPLICATION SEOULS SE FILED BY: 15 APRIL 1979
Interested students in engineering, physics, biology, chemis-
try, pre-med, or any of the other physical or biological
sciences should write:
Dr. G. Whipple, Deoartment of Environmental and Industrial
Health, Schooj of Pu lic Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
A GLIMPSE INTO DARKNESS
Conference on the Holocaust
APRIL 12 &Z 3
APRIL 1 Emil Fackenheim: "The Holocaust: Authentic and Unauthenic
Responses" KEYNOTE Address
2 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
Multi-Media Program:'
Dance Performance: I NEVER SAW ANOTHER BUTTERFLY
Film: NIGHT AND FOG
Photographic and Wire Sculpture Exhibit
Panel Discussion: P rsonaI Accounts of Survivorsr
7:15 pm Pendleton Room
APRIL 2 Rev. John T. Pawlikowski: "Confronting the Holocaust from
a Christian Perspective" 7:30 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
APRIL 3 Henry Feingold: "The Politics of Rescue: The Roosevelt
Administration land the Holocaust" 7:30 pm Rackham Amphitheatre
Sponsored by: Michigan Student Assembly; Vice President for Academic
Affgirs, University of Michigan; B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation; Program in
Judaic Studies; LSA-SG; Office of Ethics and Religion; Lord of Light Lutheran
Church; Program on Studies in Religion; Jewish Community Council of
Washtenow County.

Conservatives oust British

From AP andiReuter
LONDON-A one-vote margin in the
House of Commons toppled Prime
Minister James Callaghan's minority
Labor government last night, forcing
national elections that could bring
Britain and Europe their first woman
chief of government.
Callaghan's three years of shaky rule
ended when the House of Commons
voted 311-310 for an opposition no-
confidence motion. It was on Conser-
vative Party leader Margaret That-
cher's censure motion.
CALLAGHAN immediatelyannoun-
ced he would recommend to Queen
Elizabeth that Parliament be dissolved
and an election held. The date was ex-
pected to be May 3 or May 10.
The result followed one of the most
exciting votes in British history. Con-
servative members of Parliament
greeted it by throwing their arms in the
air and waving agenda papers. Labor
politicians reacted by singing "The Red
Flag."
Callaghan's government has been
beset by crippling strikes in recent
months. He is the first prime minister
ousted on a confidence vote since Ram-
say MacDonald, Britain's first Labor
premier, was turned out 55 years ago.
Thatcher, 53, who has been called "a
Tory glamor" girl by critics at home
and "the iron maiden" by newspapers
in the Soviet Union, opened the debate
yesterday by saying: "The government
has failed the nation, lost credibility
1 and it is time for it to go. Britain is now
a nation on the sidelines. Rarely in the
post-war period can our standing in the
world have been lower or our defenses

weaker."
Latest polls show Thatcher's Conser-
vatives far ahead of Labor.
THE VOTE INDICATED seven ab-
stentions from the 635 members of the
House of Commons. Those not voting
were not immediately identified.
Immediately after the vote,
Callaghan said, "We will take our case
to the country."~
Thatcher replied that her party
believes the elections should be called
"as a matter of urgency."
Thatcher charged that the Labor
government has "doubled prices,
doubled dole queues, doubled debt,
diminished our defenses and under-
mined public respect and confidence in
the law."
CALLAGHAN DEFENDED his
policies and sniped at the minority fac-
tions that have allied themselves with
the Conservatives, saying, "The
minority parties have walked into a
trap . . . It is the first time in recorded
history that turkeys have been known to
vote for an early Christmas."
Labor has been badly hurt by this
winter's string of truckers' and general
service strikes that crippled the shaky
economy and inconvenienced the
general public.
The no-confidence motion, howelver,
was triggered by Callaghan's failure to
win support for a referendum on
limited home rule in Scotland and the
subsequent defection of the Scottish
Nationalists in Parliament.
FOR THE PAST two years,
Callaghan's administration has relied
on pacts and deals with the minority
parties to keep its tenuous hold on of-

" fice; Conservatives branded him "a
wheeler-dealer" but his personal
popularity has stayed high in the
opinion polls.
Although Thatcher will begin the for-
thcoming campaign'as the favorite to
take over at 10 Downing Street, her
three years as Conservative leader
have not been easy.
Critics say she has a middle-class
school mistress manner which upsets
working class voters and she has
sometimes struggled to hold the atten-
tion of Parliament.
LABOR HAS BEEN in trouble since it
narrowly won an Oct. 10, 1974, general
election under Harald Wilson. The par-
ty started off with a slim majority of 319
seats, which has been whittled down to
306 by defeats in several special elec-
tions.
Following a series of resignations and
defections that sapped the party,
Wilson suddenly resigned the premier-
ship. Callaghan succeeded him as par-
ty leader and prime minister on April 5,
1976.
Labor limped along in power through
a string of deals with minority parties.

But wh
Scotland
secure E
referend
lawmak
Callaghr
call for t

gov t
en government plans, to give
d partial home rule failed to
enough votes in the March 1
dum, 11 Scottish National Party
ers withdrew their support of
on, initiating the Conservative
the confidence vote.

Callaghan
... three years' rule ended

P arochiid opposition

I
APPLIANCE CO.

t f
Of
1
WEEva

FRON

1 3550 WASHTENAW TO 3570 WASHTENAW

fl s in petition
By MARY FARANSKI last fall, butt
Today is the official deadline for the cessful that m
Michigan Council About Parochiaid private institu
(MCAP) to file its petition, signed by and only recei
people who oppose state tuition grants Next, year,
for private college students, but the grants to b
Council gave up its fight two days ago. sophomores,a
"We are sure the voters would turn it cover all und
down if they had the chance, but they colleges, withI
didn't have the chance," said Kathryn STATE BO
Boucher, the council's executive direc- ber Annetta N
tor, speaking about the council's drive is not going in
to get the parochiaid question on the the govern
Michigan ballot. Education As
THE PETITION drive began when to "make cer
the Michigan legislature convened in as possible go
January, and in 90 days only about Miller adde
100,000 of the 143,361 signatures needed would.have
to put the issue on the ballot were Michigan "ac
collected. how they wan
The legislature, in order to encourage added thatn
more students to attend Michigan's 44 public schools
private colleges and universities, ap- grants but w
proved a $6.2 million tuition grant last because priv
spring. It gave an automatic $600 grand already clair
to each of 12,300 entering freshpersons state allotmen

drive

the program was so suc-
nore students entered the
tions than were expected;
ved about $500 each.
the program will give
both freshpersons and
and in two years, it will
dergraduates in private
$20 million yearly.
ARD of Education mem-
Miller said all this money
to public schools. She said
nor-appointed Higher
sistance Authority wants
tain that as much money
es into private schools."
d that the ballot proposal
given the residents of
chance to decide if that's
t their money spent." She
many students attending
s were eligible for tuition
ere. not able to get them
vate school students had,
med a large part of the
nt.

EVERYTHING IN THE
MALE
-,STORE IS ON SALE
* MANY ITEMS AT A FRACTION OF THEIR
ORIG INAL PRICE EVERYTHING IS PRICED
TO SELL ON SIGHT , IT'S CHEAPER TO
SELL THEM THAN MOVE THEM * SAVE!
Help us clean house. We save moving costs and you get yourself a great
bargain in the deal. We've tagged everything at savings in an effort to
move 'em out before we have to move'em with us. We've turned thestore
into a bargain hunters paradise! SAVE! Everything is up for grabs! Come
in - Browse, Rummage, Buy. In addition to our new-in-carton stocks
and new floor display models we've accumulated an assortment of tired,
worn merchandise. If you don't mind a nick here or a scratch there you
can make the buy of a lifetime. And very important - your purchase is
backed by service from our own service department. And you receive the
full factory warranty on your purchase.
WE ARE NOT GOING OUT OF BUSINESS.
WE'LL SOON BE MOVING NEXT DOOR
TO A NEW AND LARGER STORE.

'Great Train' derailed

(Continued from Page 7)
libidinous richies our heroes are trying
to fleece).
As a master safecracker, Donald
Sutherland struggles as best he can
with what was intended as a comic part
- except that Crichton has failed to
provide him any funny lines or
situations: Some actors can conjure
laughs out of thin air, but Sutherland is
not the 'type; and it becomes a little
embarrassing to watch him try so
gallantly and so futilely.

The Great Train Robbery is an ar-'
tistic anomaly. The picture has nothing
to say, and takes an agonizingly long
time not saying it; there appears no
discernible reason to have filmed it
other than to make a lot of money
which, according to current box office
totals, is exactly what it's been doing. It
looks like a case of the old art-vs.-
business syndrome, and though
Crichton may emerge the economic
victor, the moviegoing public remains
the decided aesthetic loser.

_
.+
n

I

EVERYTHING IS "TAKE-WITH" PRICED
If you require delivery there will be an extra charge

V I

U l

f

O d '
'

I ls

1

N

r

AKAI ~P ^«\
a E

r C'
9R) d
0K

ENTIRE INVENTORY
INCREDIBLY LOW-PRICED!
RECEIVERS TURNTABLES * SPEAKERS
" 8-TRACK & CASSETTE DECKS " REEL-
TO-REEL DECKS * CAR STEREO o COM-
PONENT SYSTEMS " COMPACT STEREO
SYSTEMS * RADIOS * CALCULATORS
" PORTABLE TAPE RECORDERS " TV'S
AND APPLIANCES OF EVERY KIND
CHOOSE TOP AUDIO BRANDS
PIONEER * MARANTZ eTECHNICS .JBL
eTEAC eRTR * SANSUI " eAKAI .SANYO
" SONY * CRAIG * JENSEN * SHARP
" BSR " BIC * AMPEX " ALTEC " & MORE
IN ADDITION TO MERCHANDISE THAT IS
IN THE STORE, YOU CAN BUY
NEW-IN-CARTON ITEMS STOCKED IN OUR
WAREHOUSE AT SPECIAL LOW PRICES.

65----
Ei

The
Mountain
Parka

Our MOUNTAIN PARKA is a super tough, mul-
tipurpose, double layer garment with the empha-
sis on function and fit. Features include inner and
outer shel;s of windtight, water-repellent 65/35
polyester/cotton, six pockets, Velcro wrist ad-
justment, 2-way No. 10 Delrin zipper, throat flap,
integral hood, hood and waist drawcords. Dark
Blue, Forest Green or Tan. From 155
ILA R LI wu~aI ILP / 00 ur

SALE NOW THRU SAT., MAR. 31.
ITS FIRST COME - FIRST SERVED ON
FLOOR MODELS AND OTHER ONE-OF-A-KIND ITEMS
OPEN DAILY 10to9

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