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March 27, 1979 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-27

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Page 12-Tuesday, March 27, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Goodall

leaves

post Gas prices

j

at U-M Dearborn

Washington Legislative
Internship Program,
If you're a junior or senior wit at least a 3.0 average, you can
spend the fall on Capitol Hill earning 16 credits and learning
what practical politics is all about.
You'll work with members of Congress, government agencies,
and perhaps see Washington-and yourself-in a totally dif-
ferent light.
Filing deadline is May 1. To apply, oi for further information,
call (617) 353-2408, or write:
Boston University Washington Legislative Internship Program,
College of Liberal Arts-Room 302, 725 Commonwealth
Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215.
Boston University
Boston University admits students regardless of their race, color, national origin, religion, sex,
age, handicap, and veteran status to all its programs and activities. A copy of theUniversity's
complete policy on discrimination is printed in the University catalogue and may be obtained
from the Affirmative Action Officer, 19 Deerfield Street, Boston, MA 02215
(617/353-4478).

By VICKI HENDERSON
For the second time in a year, the
University of Michigan is losing an ad-
ministrator. Leonard Goodall, Chan-
cellor of the University's Dearborn
campus, announced last Friday that he
would be leaving at the end of the term
to accept the position of president of the
University of Nevada.
When Goodall assumed his position in
Dearborn in 1971, the two year upper
class only school had only 800 enrolled
students. Since that time, enrollment
has increased to 6,000 and programs
have been expanded to include fresh-
men, sophomores and masters
programs in some aresas.
GOODALL SAID he enjoyed his
eight-year stay at the Dearborn cam-
pus. His appointment at Nevada, he
said, "will give me an opportunity to
serve a larger university in a rapidly
growing city and state."
"I will leave with mixed emotions,"
he said. "I am satisfied with the

development of the campus."
Goodall has attempted to accom-
modate the large increase in
enrollment by initiating the construc-
tion of new facilities on the campus.
"HE HAS WORKED with former-
President Fleming on new
classroom bunlaings, a library, and a
mall which are now in progress," said
Bill Rapai of the Michigan Journal, the
student newspaper.
"PEOPLE ARE sorry to see him go,
but they have been expecting it," said
Rapai. "It has been rumored that
Goodall would be going to the Univer-
sity of Wyoming or the University of
Hawaii several weeks ago. We knew.
he'd be leaving - we just didn't know
when or where he'd go."
Assistant Chancellor Burton
Harrison told the Journal it is too soon
to speculate about the selection of a new
chancellor. A selection committee will
be appointed by President Smith and
"I'm sure both internal and external
searches will be made," said Goodall.

A

1-STOP SHOPPING SAVES MONEY, TIME, ENERGY

1 11 JA Im"A

Ma

A

I L, 164

O
ME'Si& BOYS
JOGGERS
Nylon and suede uppers, full
cushioned insole with arch sup-
port.
1 MEN'S 6-11, 12, 13 96
AFTER AD 15.96...... . p.
" BOYS' 21/24 1 96
AFTER AD 1496.......P. .r.
sbe D a..

PRICES GOOD TNRU SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1979. MEiJER RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT SALES ACCORDING TO SPECIFIED LIMITS. NO SALES TO DEALERS, IN-
STITUTIONS OR DITRIBUTORS.

-

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1

may rise to
$1a gallon
in city.
By CHARLES THOMSON
Ann Arbor will not be spared when
gasoline prices begin to shoot up later
this year, predict local service station
owners. Two local operators said that a
gallon of gas will cost a dollar by the
end of the year, and one owner said his
station is already receiving less gas
now than it was during the 1973 Arab oil
embargo.
"By the end of the year, the price will
be pretty close to a dollar a gallon,"
said Jim Wolfe, manager of C-Ted's
Standard at South University and
Forest. He cited the cutoff of oil ship-
ments from Iran and lower allocations
from the major oil companies as the
principal reasons for his prediction.
CLARENCE Heidenescher, owner of
Glen-Ann Gulf, predicted not only
higher prices, but a major shortage,
especially of unleaded gasoline, which
could begin as early as next month.
"We're getting less gas now than we
were in the oil shortage in 1973," said
Heidenescher. "Our allocation is 3000 to
3200 gallons less per month now than it
was then."
Both Heidenescher and Wolfe asser-
ted that higher prices would not lower
the demand for fuel. "They don't care
how high the price of gasoline goes,
they want to drive their cars," said
Heidenescher. He said some customers
told him they might be willing to pay up
to two dollars per gallon if necessary.
Customers at both stations backed up
the operators. "(High gas prices) won't
keep me from driving," said Michelle
Green as she filled her tank. "You have
to get around. When a price rise comes,
it comes."
"No matter' how high the price of
gasoline gets, I still have to drive," said
Mary McCune.
Property
tax hikes.
ignite 4th
ward race
"(Coninuedfrom Pae1)n
voting for Headlee 4A&t November
"they (now) had a solution" to such
rising taxes. Consequently, Hood also
suggests changing some of the
provisions of Headlee so as to comply
with the "spirit and intent of Headlee"
to lower an individual's taxes.
DEMOCRATIC mayoral candidate
James Kenworthy discards such
Republican pledges of "I'll cut your
taxes after elections" as one of those
statements "that should never be
believed." Cappaert, too, while
pledging not to increase the millage,
says, "I don't propose to reduce the
millage," and consequently takes a dif-
ferent angle on the tax assessment
issue.
Cappaert insists the problem of con-
stantly rising housing values, and
property taxes is part of what he calls
Ann Arbor's "most critical issue" -
housing. Cappaert, therefore, em-
phasizes attention to and coordination
with the University remedy Ann Ar-
bor's "uterly clear need for housing,"
particularly low and middle income
housing.
As a more immediate response, Cap-

paert advocates "an outreach program
stemming from the City Assessor's of-
fice" to provide advance information
and help for those "people entitled to
benefits but not aware of them."
SDS founder
speaks
(continued from Page 1
nam Update" presented by Barbara
Fuller of the Interfaith Council for
Peace who told them that the current
problems in Vietnam were caused by
the failure of the United States to move
ahead with peace negotiations after the
war ended.
"The United States is still very much
involved in Southeast Asia," Fuller
asserted.
History Prof. Norman Owen spoke
also, addressing the media's role in
rewriting history in relation to the Viet-
nam War.
"THERE'S A distinct movement
toward the kind of revisionism that got
us into the war in the first place," he
said.
Owen contended that revisionists
were attempting to reverse the lessons

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