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January 11, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Thursday, January 11, 1979-
Despite t
By DAN PERRIN
True, the Michigan hockey team isn't
exactly tearing apart the Western
Collegiate Hockey Association this
season. While the dekers have not fared
well as a team, there are some in-
dividuals who have been playing out-
standing hockey. One of these bright
spots is freshman center Murray
Eaves, a highly-regarded recruit from
Windsor, Ontario.
Eaves currently leads the Wolverines
in scoring with 11 goals and 21 assists,
good for 32 points in 20 games, and has
been responsible for two of the team's
three shorthanded goals.
And if those statistics aren't im-
pressive enough, going into last
weekend's series with Minnesota,
Eaves had produced at least one point
in 17 of the 18 games played, including
the last 13 in a row. He ranked third in
the WCHA scoring race with 27 points
(nine goals, 18 assists.)
After being shut out by Minnesota a
week ago, the 5-10, 175-pound puckster
has dropped into a tie for ninth place,
still respectable for a first-year player
in a tough league.
Eaves, for one, is surprised at his
quick success and gave his reasons for

-The Michigan Daily

Affair

eam's woes, rookie standout Eaves off to great start

it. "The key thing is that (freshman
center Terry) Cullen is sidelined and
(junior center Dan) Lerg was hurt.
That gave me the opportunity to play
more; I've had more chances to get
points."
Head Coach Dan Farrell agrees,
"The injuries have helped him a lot.
Playing 30 minutes a game is a lot of
time. He's had more responsibility and
because of it, I think he'll be a better
player."
Although individually, Eaves is doing
extremely well, the icer's deep, hazel
eyes droop when thoughts turn to the
team.
"It's always great to do well in-
dividually," asserted the stocky
youngster. "But it's important for the
team to.win.
"I'm not used to a losing at-
mosphere," he continued. "It's not
depressing, it's frustrating. I've never
been on a team that's finished below
.500 before."
Eaves, in fact, has played on three
championship teams in the past four
years. At Assumption High School, a
parochial school in Windsor, the curly-
haired freshman led the squad in
scoring twice as they won three city

championships.
He then racked up 40 goals and 40
assists his senior year and took the
Junior B Windsor Royals to the
Canadian national semi-finals.
The youngest of three boys, Eaves
never really had a choice when it came
to playing hockey. His father, Cecil, is a
University of Denver hockey alumnus
who just finished eight years as head
hockey coach at the University of Win-
dsor. His older brother Mike was a star
at Wisconsin and now is in his first year
in the National Hockey League.
"My dad took us (Murray, Mike and
another brother, Paul) out on the ice
when I was three years old," recalled
Eaves. "I couldn't skate, but he'd carry
me around.
"In later years, he'd also take us to
the University of Windsor, get the team
started on a drill, then take us down the
ice and work with us," added the rookie
sensation. "I learned a great deal from
my dad."
Eaves always has been close to his
mother and father, who have attended
the majority of his games throughout
his career. Thus, the absence of his
parents, who are traveling in China,
makes the losses even harder to take.
With no one to talk to face-to-face, the
dreamy-eyed, sandy-haired skater has
resorted to calling big brother Mike in
Oklahoma City, where Mike plays on
the NHL Minnesota North Stars' top
farm club. Mike helps keep Murray
going after a tough loss or two.
"Mike talked about his sophomore
year at Wisconsin when all their top
players were playing on the Olympic
team," said Eaves. "He told me how he
got through a really tough year. He
said, If you make the best of what you
have, everything should fall into
place'."
With Mike a proven star at Wiscon-

sin, there had been much ado made
about Murray. Mike was the scoring co-
champion and Most Valuable Player in
the WCHA last year and many expected
Murray to pick up where Mike had left
off. But Murray didn't like the vibes
and chose Michigan instead.
"Wisconsin took for granted I'd go
there because of Mike's success," noted
the always-smiling deker. "But if I
went there, I knew I'd be compared
there more than anywhere else. I don't
want to be known as 'Mike's brother'.
"Also, Windsor is 45 minutes away-

from here," added Eaves, who is an
avid drummer on the side. "I can .go
home a lot to play my drums and my
parents can come up to see me. These
may possibly be my last four years in
hockey."
Coach Dan Farrell is one man who
certainly is glad to have the younger
Eaves on his side: "He's a pretty com-
plete player for a freshman,"
remarked the seventh-year coach. "He
will improve in every aspect of the
game. He doesn't have a visible
weakness.

"He's certainly one of the top fresh-
men in,.the league. He could be one of
the all-time great players they've had
here at Michigan."
Captain Mark Miller heartily agrees,
"This is a tough league for a freshman
to do well in. Very seldom do you see a
guy that burns it up. It's amazing he's
going at the clip he is."
Whether he's banging away on the
drums or banging the puck into the net,
there can be no doubt Murray Eaves is
doing it the only way he knows how -
better than all the rest.

WorkkWith Kids at
CAMP TAMARACK
Brighton and Ortonville, Michigan. Jobs for counselors,
specialists, supervisors, and many other camp positions.
Interviewing, January 18 & 31
Summer Placement Office
YCALL 763-4116 for an appointment. Camp Tamarack is the Jewish
Residential Camp sponsored by the Fresh Air Society of Metropolitan Detroit,
6600 West Maple Road, W. Bloomfield, Ml 48033. 313/661-0600. Please call or
write us for application or additonal information.
ARMY SURPLUS
Pea Coats Selected Winter
reg. $43.98 " COATS 9
SALE $38.98 Now on Sale
LEVIS SPECIAL PURCHASE
L EVISFelt-ined
Straights, Flares, Cords
349 Snowmobile Boots
All Fashion Jeans 20% OFF $10,98
Sale Ends 1/31/79
201 E. WASHINGTON-994-3572
*S
1 MON-SA T 9-6

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
THE PUCK HAS just been dropped, and already Murray Eaves takes off for the Denver net in quest of a goal. That's no
surprise. The Windsor, Ont. freshman leads the team in scoring with 11 goals and 21 assists.

PURDUE OPENS THREE GAME ROAD TRIP:

Blue cagers

look
-rl

By GARY KICINSKI_
It may be a bit too early in the Big
Ten season to be talking in terms of
"must" wins, but the Michigan
Wolverines can afford another loss to
Purdue tonight about as much as Nestle
can afford a chocolate shortage.
Michigan's cagers, 1-1 in the con-
ference following last Saturday's
shocking 85-79 loss to Iowa, begin a
three-game road swing today that will
provide a pretty good idea of whether
the Wolverines will be eating cake or
Biliards
at the
Union
reduced rates
everyday 1-6 p.m.
"Play the game
that always wins"

crow come Marh 3r

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1979-80 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting January 16, 1979
In Ms. Charlene Coady's Office, 1500 SAB
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Head Resident, Resident Director, Assistant
Resident Director, Resident Advisor, Head
Librarian, Resident Fellow, Minority Peer
Advisors and Graduate Student Teaching
Assistant
Advisory-positions require the completion of a minimum of 55 credit hours by the end of the
1979 Winter Term for the Resident Fellows in Residential College, Resident Advisor and Minor-
ity Peer Advisor positions: Graduate status for Graduate Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot
Program, Head Librarian, Head Resident and Resident Director positions. However, qualified
undergraduate applicants may be considered for the Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann Arbor Cam-
pus during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours
the end of the 1979 Winter term. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in
residence halls at University level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must
have a 2.5 cumulative grade point overage and graduate applicants must be in good academic
standinig at the end of the 1978 Fall term in the school or college in which they are enrolled.
(5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to carry heavy academic schedules and
who do not have rigorous outside commitments. (6) Applicants with children will not be con-
sidered. (7) Proof of these qualifications may be required.
Present staff and other individuals who have an application on file must come to the Housing
O~ffice tohi update their nnnlicntion form.

4 rV LA1flvS., H al U .
The itinerary has the Wolverines
scheduled for stops at Purdue, Wiscon-
sin and Northwestern before returning
home a week from Saturday for a battle
with the Buckeyes of Ohio State. And
they needn't look very far to come up
with incentives to beat the Boiler-
makers.
First, there's the obvious incentive to
bounce back from the embarrassing
home loss. As Mike McGee, who shot
just 7 for 18 against Iowa, admitted,
"We lost a game at home that we
shouldn't have lost."
Second, Michigan would like to
avenge its double decisive defeats at
the hands of Purdue last season. The
cagers managed to shoot just 38 percent
from the field in each game, losing 80-65
at home and 75-66 at West Lafayette. In
the away game Purdue blew Michigan
out in the opening minutes of the con-
test, rolling up a 32-8 lead at one point.
And third, first-year Purdue coach
Lee Rose is the man responsible for the
Wolverines returning home unexpec-
tedly early from the 1977 NCAA tour-
nament. Rose, then coach of North
Carolina-Charlotte, piloted his cin-
derella 49ers to a stunning 75-68 upset
over Michigan in Mideast Regional
play.
But incentive is only half the battle, if
that much. And while Purdue, Wiscon-
sin and Northwestern just might finish
eight-nine-ten this year,athe Wolverines
are hardly pocketing a win already,
considering the Iowa debacle.
"I think this is a verycritical week
for us," said assistant coach Bill
Frieder, "but it's not an absolute must
win at Purdue. But if we're going to be a
Featuring
a large selection
of
VAPDMfh AAPH

0
Ling for
contender in the Big Ten and go on to
the NCAA's we have to win at least two
of the next three."
Purdue would seem to be the toughest
of the three teams if based by its con-
ference finish last year-tied with
Michigan for fourth place. However,
said Frieder, "Purdue will be the
toughest because we play them first.
But going into Wisconsin won't be no
picnic either."
The Boilermakes were really cooking
in 'the preseason, chalking up an im-
pressive 10-2 non-conference record,
including three straight wins in the
Rainbow Classic, beating Boston
College, Arizona State, and Utah. But
midwestern weather problems
wouldn't allow the Purdue team to
return home before opening the Big Ten
season, and thus the Boilermakers flew
directly to Columbus and Bloomington,
where they suffered defeats. The
travel-weary Boilermakers spent 14
straight days away from West Lafayet-
te, and it showed in their play as they
fell 75-71 to Ohio State and 63-54 to In-
diana.
Guard Jerry Sichting said that he was
tired five minutes into the Indiana
game, but coach Rose refused to alibi.
"We don't want to dwell on the travel
problems. That sounds like a cop-out.
We feel with better execution and more
confidence in our shooting we'll be able
to play them very competitively."
Jet lag or no, Michigan coach Johnny

rebound
Orr expects nothing but the stiffest of
challenges from the Boilermakers, who
play inspired ball in Mackey Arena.
"They're a very fine basketball team,"
Orr said. "Joe Barry Carroll, when he's
going good, is as fine a center as anyone
in the country. He's been playing very,
very well and he's a lot stronger than he
was a year or two ago."
Indeed, Carroll is off to his finest
season yet. The 7-1 junior center is
shooting 56 percent from the field and
tallying 20.2 ppg. He's also averaging
10.4 rebounds per contest.
Beside Carroll though, only Sichting
is contributing offensively. His 14.1
average, combined with Carroll's
production, accounts fore48 percent of
the team's scoring output. "Teams are
beginning to key on them because
they're doing all the scoring," said
Rose. "That's making it difficult to
penetrate and get the high-percentage
shots.
Purdue's other starters are
sophomore guard Brian Walker (3.6
ppg), and forwards Steve Walker (4.9
ppg) and Arnett Hallman (7.1 ppg). The
Walker brothers are transfers from
North Carolina State. Michigan plans to
go with the same lineup it has been
using.
Adding to Purdue's problems is the
fact that Michigan State rolls into town
after the Wolverines pull out. "I worked
for three years to build up our schedule
at UNCC," joked Rose, "and now I'd
'like to get out of one."

Michigan ten-game statistics

PlayerF
McGee.........
Hubbard .......
Hardy .........
Bodnar, Marty .
Johnson......
Smith ........
Garner ........
Lozier.......
Staton .......
Heuerman .....
Garris .........
Bodnar, Mark..
MICHIGAN ....
Opponents .....

FG-FGA Pct.
103-219 .470
64-122 .525
56-90 .622
42-86 .488
30-61 .492
23-49 .469
17-32 .531
9-21' .429
7-18 .388
7-12 .583
1-3 .333
0-3 .000

FT-FTA
40-59
33!48
10-12
10-13
2-3
12-17
9-15
4-8
0-0
6-8
0-1
0-1

Pct.
.678
.687
.833
.769
.666
.706
.600
.500
.750
.000
.000

Rbs
75
102
68
34
28
19
44
15
4
23
2
2

Avg
7.5
11.3
6.8
3.4
.2.8
1.9
4.4
1.5
0.5
2.3
0.6
0.6

A
21
11
13
29
15
25
10
10
13
4
0
1

PF-D
36-2
29-2
26-1
28-2,
22-0
24-1
18-0
19-0
10-0
16-1
0-0
1-0

Ayg
24.6
17.0
12.2
9.9
6.2
5:8
4.3
2.2
2.0
2.0
0.0
0.0
83.8
75.6

354-713
305-666

.496 130-189 .688 458 45.8
.458 146-220 .664 360 36.0

152 226-9
105 196-9

The Office of Financial Aid
(2011 SAB)
deadline for Spring /Summer
Financial Aid Applications is
January 12, 1.979
The Spring /Summer

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