100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Sunday, March 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily

r

V

what's W
EWA

INTERESTS LIE ELSEWHERE
Students avoid Pilot curriculum

oernight
at the Paper Chase
introducing our new 9400
2-Sided duplicating system !
Michigan Union open 7 days a week
till 10 p. m. 665-8065

* .,b

R. N. PROGRAM
A CAREER IN NURSING
Mercy School of Nursing of Detroit
is a Two Year Hospital Based
Diploma Program
to be a
REGISTERED NURSE
Admission Requirement: High school graduation with a
C plus overage, Biology, Chemistry and 2 years of Math.
First year at Samaritan Health Center-St. Joseph Mercy
Hospital unit, Detroit.
Second year at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor and/or
Pontiac. STUDENT PARKING PROVIDED
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 923-5704, ext. 376

BY JOHN GOYER
The Pilot Program came down with a
disease in 1975 that it's been trying to
shake ever since, the disease of student
apathy.
Many of the 275 students in the
program, housed in Alice Lloyd Hall,
hardly seem to know what function the
program serves, nor do they seem to
care.
THE STUDENTS don't take the
program seriously, according to one
participant. But like most, she con-
cedes that the program has its benefits.
PilothStudents in general seem to
think the program is a good idea in
theory, but admit they are more in-
terested in their future careers than in
a liberal arts education. While
acknowledging the opportunities are
there for an innovative learning ex-
perience, most would rather concen-
trate on vocational training.
"I wouldn't take one of their
seminars,"dsaid Pilot student Scott
Steinberg. "But that's because I'm
going into the Business School, and
they're (Business School admissions)
pretty picky."
The Pilot Program offers courses in
Alice Lloyd Hall, taught by graduate
students who live in the dorm among
the students.
Program director Eric Lipson said
one of the program's goals is to create
the atmosphere of a small liberal arts
school using the resources of'a much
larger University.

But the career-oriented attitude of
the students prevents the program
from creating that atmosphere.
THIS ATTITUDE was expressed ap-
tly by one student who said, "When
you're in Pilot, all it means is that you
can take Pilot courses, and you're
guaranteed a seat in the classroom."
"
'There's something lacking.
There's nothing spectacular
about being in Pilot.'
-A Pilot Program student.
"There's something lacking," said
one student. "There's nothing spec-
tacular about being in Pilot."
Another student who did not want to
be identified, said, "I'm going here for
a purpose, and I can't really get in-
volved in the intellectual world. Sure, I
want to learn ...but it didn't pique my
interest."
The student said he was too worried
about his vocational training to get in-
volved in liberal arts.
SEVERAL SOURCES confirmed this
trend. Typical is the report of a
Literary College faculty study conduc-
ted last May. "Students are more con-
servative as a result of the recent

recession and the obvious constriction
of career opportunities ahead," the
,report stated."
This ideology is apparently at odds
with the philosophy of the Pilot
Program. "We have a commitment to
innovation," said resident Teaching
Fellow Leonard Garfield. He said the
program had attempted to address
career oriented students by offering
courses in law, environment, and
psychology. But as an English teacher,
Garfield said, "If I can reach 25 per
cent of my students, that's great."
The attitude of many students today
"goes against the whole philosophy of
the Pilot 'Program," said Teaching
Fellow Jan Schleiger. "The purpose of
an education is to experience different
views, to break down some of your
prejudices," but students just don't
want to take chances, Schleiger said. A
dance teacher, Schleiger related the
story of a student who came up and
asked to take her class, but then
changed her mind because she didn't
know what a dance class would look like
on her transcript.
TEACHING Fellow Gary Peters said
he seesthis role as that of someone who
helps students get involved, but added
that in the end the motivation must
come from the student. "I would like
them to take that step instead of taking
them by the hand," Peters said. "If
they're pushed, they tend to resent it."

Italian Pan Pizza By The Slice * Antipasto Salads * Wine . Beer * Liquor * Spaghetti
d
0 3
the CU. has arrived
3 "
M U0Q
0 "
.: Moni.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. a
- Sun. .m.-1a.m.3
em 1
Cs. .s
j4e . 3M.soogosdw
ft0z o al~ e~~ug.;;yod

..vy "cia i..... .. ... .. ... .. 'v. .... . .
a Daily Official Bulletin

MONDAY. MARCH 19, 1979
Daily Calendar:
Near Eatern Ctr.: Robert Hewson, "State and
Society in Ancient and Medieval Armenia," Comrn
mons Rm., Lane Hall, noon.
Ctr. Study of Higher Education: Nolen Ellison,
Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland, Ohio,
"Emerging Challenges for Urban Colleges," E.
Conf. Rm., Rackham, 2:30 p.m.
Museum of Zoology: Charles Kugler, Cornell-U.,
"Chemical Warfare in Ants: A New Weapon," Lee.
Rm.. II, MLB, 4 p.m.
Music School: Composers Forum, SM Recital Hall,
8p.m.
Anthropology/Museum of Anthropology: Robert
Adams, U-Chicago, "The [dialogue Civilization."
Raekham Amph.,8p.m.
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
:3200 SA B 764-7460
National Newspaper Food Editors Internship
Program-open to juniors and seniors in journalism
or home economics. Work for news editor of the
newspaper of your choice. Maximum $2,000 stipend
for 10 week internship. April 1 deadline. Entry form
and further information, contact CP&P.
Food Service Management Scholarships and
Awards available to students in dietetics and other
food service related .curricula. Request scholarship
kit from the National Institute for the Food Service
Industry, 20 N. Wacker Dr., Suite 2620, Chicago, I1
60606. .g ,4
Undergraduate Summer Fellowships in
Technology Assessment-the 6 week summer
program is designed for'students from all disciplines
to work together in the search for solutions to social
issues. Room and Board plus $100 per week.
Madison General Hospital Recruitment Day, Mar-
ch 31 and April 24, 1979. Nurses interested in a career
with MGH are encouraged to attend the Recruitment
Day. Regisiration cards, motel information, and
program schedule are available at CP&P, or write
to: MGH, 202 South Park Street, Madison, WI 53715.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 763-4117
Chevrolet Information Service, Detroit, Mi. Will
interview Thurs., Mar. 22 from 9 to 5. Must have
completed Sophomore or Junior year-majoring in
computer science. Register by phone or in person.
Camp Wise, Ohio, Soc. Work Camp. Will interview
Tues., Mar. 20 from 10 to 5. Openings for specialists
in arts/crafts, nature, tripping, sports waterfront
(WSI), village supervisors.
Dept. of Interior, U.S. FISH & Wildlife, Washing-
ton, D.C. GS-7 position open for a major in wildlife
management or wildlife science. Further details
available. Deadline Apr. 2. ,
Torch Lake Yacht & Country Club, Traverse City.
Life Guard opening. Must have passed DRed Cross
Life Saving course or equivalent training. Good
salary plus room/board. Car required. Further
details available.
KMS Fusion, Ann Arbor, Mi. Openings for
graduate students in the fields of physics, elec. engr.,
nuclear rngr. Further details available.
Royal Oal Recreation, Day Camp Counselors
needed. Openings for specialists in arts/crafts,
games, athletics, other outdoor skills. Further
details available.
Maccabees Mutual Life, Southfield, Mi. Opening in
the acturial dept. for the summer. Students must
have Part IV knowledge and Fortran desirable. Good
salary. Further details available.
Menasha, Otsego, Mi. Openings for elec. and
mech. engrs. must have completed junior year and
up. GodsalaiY. Odfther detailsavailable.
INTERVIEWS:
Camp Tamarack, Mi. coed. Will interview Weds,
Mar. 21 from 9 to 3:30. Many specialized fields still
available. Register by phone or in person.
Island House, Mackinac Island. Will interview
Mon./Tues., Mar. 19, 20. Wide range of
openings-waiters, waitresses, clerks, maintenance,
kitchens, kitchen help, etc. Register in person or by
phone.

Another teaching fellow, Kim Turner,
has a slightly different ide~a. If you
don't try to motivate the students, she
said, "you're kind of writing off your
ideals, too."
Schleiger pointed out that her dance
course is a special benefit for the
students, as they are all guaranteed a
place in the class. "It's here, it's
available," she said. "A lot of students
don't know the fight that goes on to get
into the technique classes in the dance
department." Schleiger expressed
regret that students don't appreciate
such benefits more.
THERE ARE some students,
however, who are eager to utilize the
benefits of the program. According-to
freshwoman Rene Radcliffe, the
program has worked because there is
a "definite sense of community."
RADCLIFFE explained that
everyone at her high school was from
the middle-class and white. Through
the Pilot Program, she has met studen-
ts who practice the Hindu religion. "I
never understood what Hinduism was
all about until I lived with Hindus," she
said.
The freshwoman said her teachers'
enthusiasm inspired her to work. Of her
Pilot English teacher, she said, "His
heart and soul are in what he's doing."
OVER 60
UNITED NATIONS (AP)-The num-
ber of people over 60 will double in the
next 21 years, according to projections
by the U.N. Fund for Population Ac-
tivities.
The over-6O group is expected to
number nearly 600 million by the year
2000, the agency reports.
The increases will include a high
proportion of women who will survive
into their 60s particularly in North
America, Europe and the Soviet Union,
it adds.
AFSCME
employees
to bargain
with union
(Continued from Page 1)
A small but vocal group within the
union, the Membership Action Commit
tee (MAC), has been urging the unio
members toreject-the bargaining
team's recommendation. In a newslet
ter distributed to union workers this
week, MAC urged the membership to
increase their demands on the Univer-
sity and to vote to strike if those
demands were not met.
Anderson said this group was not a
threat to the vote today. He said they
are part of a "radical" group that has
three or four members in AFSCME
locals around this area. Even if the
recommendation was rejected today,
Anderson said, there would be "no way
that it could lead to a strike vote."
Two years ago the union did go on
strike when negotiations at that time
broke down. A 26-day walkout ensued,
disrupting dormitory and hospital ser-
vices, especially food and cleaning ser-
vices in the dorms. Neither the Univer-
sity bargaining team nor the union
leadership expects these talks to lead to
another strike.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 133
Sunday, March 18, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420,
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by

mai otsde AnAbr umrss
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
aid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Are you:
- PLANNING AND PREPARING FOR CHANGE?
- GRADUATING OR LEAVING SCHOOL?
- LEAVING HOME?
- MOVING INTO OR OUT OF AN APARTMENT?
- CHANGING YOUR MAJOR?
If so, the PEER COUNSELORS at University Counseling Services
are offering a
WORKSHOP ON
TRANSITIONS
The Counseling Services is providing an opportunity for stu-
dents to get together and talk about transition issues in an
effort to understand and cope with the process of change in
various situations.
The workshop will be facilitated by trained peer counselors.
Date: WEDNESDAY,"MARCH 21, 1979
Time: 7-9:30 p.m.
Place: Counseling Services, 3300 Michigan Union
For more information and registration come into Counseling Services or
call 76-GUIDE.

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25.

"BLESSED ARE THEY THAT DO HIS COMMANDMENTS,
THAT THEY MAY HAVE A RIGHT TO THE TREE OF LIFE,
AND MAY ENTER IN THROUGH THE GATES INTO THE
CITY.
Note the place and position the above verse occupies in
The Bible - it is the eighth from the end. Just seven more
verses and God's written Revelation to man closes. These
seven last verses contain one of the most wonderful and
glorious Invitations of God to men. Also, one of the most
terrible and awful threats of God Almighty's judgments:
THE INVITATION: "And the Spirit and the bride say,
Come.And let him that heareth say,Come. And let him that is
athirst. Come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of
life freely."
THE WATERING THREAT: "If any man shall add unto
these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are
written in this book; and if any man shall take away from the
words of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of
the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things
which are written in this book."
-r h a ...n. -.anthe curea a aet hfore men. over

flights" of the souls of two men to other worlds: one carried
by the angels to Abraham's bosom, the other died was
buried, and in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torments -
not much about the details of the trips but very definite about
the destinations and the conditions found at the end of the
journey. Let any mock and scorn who will, but as for me let
me stir up myself to "Fear The Lord and depart from evil."
"Why do the heathen rage?" A heathen is one who does
not believe in "The God of The Bible." The ones who rebel
and rail against the righteous Laws of The Holy God, and pull
down H is wrath, curse, scorn and contempt upon the human
race In judgments. While the Second Psalm gives us a pic-
ture and the cause of present world conditions and tells us
the way out, yet turn back to the First Psalm and look at a
different scene, a beautiful and fruitful tree planted by the
side of a river. It is the blessed man "that walketh not in the
counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners,
nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his delight Is in the
law of the Lord, and in His Law doth he meditate day and
night."
"In His Law doth he meditate day and night." Concerning

'''

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan