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March 16, 1979 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-16

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On sale

I

The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 16, 1979-Page 11
WRESTLER GADSON CHASES LIFETIME DREAM

Support U of M's Young Poets

Olympics in sight

for Blue coach.

RISING
Buy one
on the Diag

On sale
this week
STAR

.
-,
.
.
. ;
.
,a.
.

By'PETE LEININGER
Following a successful coaching debut at Michigan,
assistant wrestling coach Willie Gadson hopes to
coach himself into a position on the 1980 United States
Olympic team.
"I always wanted to make-the Olympic team, and
I'm still striving towards it," commented Gadson. "I
wanted to be a national champ along with that, but
failed to do so. The best I ever took was third - so
close, yet so far."
DESPITE FAILING to capture a national title,
Gadson sports some impressive credentials. After
posting a 45-0 record in junior college, Gadson tran-
sferred to Iowa State in 1975, where he became a two-
time All-American, finishing third and sixth in the
NCAA's.
While at Iowa State, Gadson also placed third in the'
Midland's Tournament, and has captured first the
'Ifeel I'm definitely going to need,
some time next year to train. You
got to go all out. There's no half-
way thing.'
-Gadson
past two seasons. The Midland's Tournament is an
annual freestyle tournament (Olympic style
wrestling) open to any wrestler in the country.
The 25-year-old assistant coach has also par-
ticipated in some international competition in the
past. In 1975, as a sophomore at Iowa State, he toured
Europe with the team, competing against wrestlers
from various countries. While overseas, he lost to a
Bulgarian before winning his next six matches.
"The latest international competition I had was
three weeks ago against the world champ (from East
Germany). I lost to him, 6-2."
GADSON, WHO now weights 195 pounds, hopes to

be at least in the top three at 198 in America by next
spring. Three American wrestlers in each weight
class will probably go to Moscow in 1980. "I would say
I would be rated among the top five in the country,"
stated Gadson.
The Wolverine coach sees Ben Peterson (shooting
for his third Olympic appearance) and Lawrence
Sousa (alternate to Peterson the last two Olympics)
as the toughest competition at 198.
In April, the AAU Tournament is held to decide the
top wrestlers in the country. These wrestlers then go
to a special camp from June to August. After the
Wi a
~ 5
WilieGdso

camp, Olympic trials are held to decide who will
represent the United States at the Olympics.
Gadson's present training entails getting up early
before work and working out for one to two hours. In
the afternoon, he wrestles for about two hours with
either 190-pounder Steve Fraser, 167-pounder Mark
Churella or heavyweight Eric Klass, a highly-touted
245-pound freshman redshirt.
"During the summer, I'll be getting completely
away from my coaching and dedicate all my time
towards training for the Olympics. I'll be at the
Olympic developmental camp for 90 days this sum-
mer."
DESPITE GADSON'S obvious confidence and
determination, he has run into some major disap-
pointments during his career. Injuries have proven to
be his most serious setback.
"Injuries have prolonged my future a lot. I've had
broken arms, and had surgery on my left knee and
hand. I have a rib problem right now. Injuries have
really discouraged me at times. But that's (the in-
juries) about the only thing that has made me feel
down."
Gadson's successful rookie year as assistant coach
of the Wolverines certainly hasn't gotten him down.
The first-year coaching tandem of Dale Bahr and
Gadson has been cited as the main reason for the im-
proved performance of this year's team. This year's
10-6 dual meet record was a major improvement over
last year's 5-9 record.
Despite this improvement, Gadson may not be
coaching next year. His success in the major tour-
naments could be an important determinant in his
coaching status next year. "I feel I'm definitely going
to need some time next year to train. You got to go all
out, there's no halfway thing . . you would be kid-
ding yourself."
Whether Gadson makes the Olympic team won't be
decided for possibly a year. But one thing is for sure,
he'll be dedicating his mind and body towards that
goal. After all, it is a lifetime dream.

ENGINEERING GRADUATESI (All Fields)
COMPUTER SCIENCE GRADUATES!
AFTER THE B.S., ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
GRADUATE SCHOOL? INDUSTRY?
There is an alternate which includes both activities. It is the Graduate Engi-
neering Student Internship Program at the University of New Mexico. This
program permits you to work 1/2 time toward an M.S. Degree and work /
time at the Professional Level in certain local industries, including Sandia
Laboratories, at competitive salaries. Selection is based on qualifications. For
additional information, write
GRADUATE ENGINEERING STUDENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
c/o DEAN OF THE ENGINEERING COLLEGE
THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87131

I

Ii

k'

YOUR BUSINESS FUTURE
In Corporations, or Government
We bring our Career Seminars on current business
needs and problems to your campus on invitation.
One full day of candid lectures by astute corporate
professicnals to assist your preparation for the de-
manding but rewarding business world. Consult us
via your faculty for detailIs.
vay u fa ut fo de al.Corporate and Public Affirs Counselors
1015 18th Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036

Uy

BOTH TEAMS BLOW LEADS
NY hands Detroit game, 88-83

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
and KEITH B. RICHBURG
Special to The Daily
PONTIAC - The Detroit Pistons
tried to give away the game last night
but the New York Knicks didn't want it
either. Despite their dismal perfor-
mance before 7,341 fans at the Silver-
dome, the Pistons managed to squeak

out with an 88-83 triumph.
The Pistons blew an 18-point lead
early in the first quarter. The Knicks -
not to be outdone - blew an 11-point
lead themselves late in the third quar-
ter and the Pistons finally won the
game between two of the NBA's non-
contenders.
"We hung in, and won and that's the
name of the game," said Piston Coach

Fidrych returning to

moundfc
LAKELAND, Fla. (UPI)-The Bird
is back, at least tentatively.
The Detroit Tigers announced
yesterday Mark Fidrych will pitch
Sunday in an exhibition game against
the Texas Rangers as long as his ailing
shoulder holds up in the next two days.
The event would mark the first time
Fidrych has pitched against a Major
League hitter since last April.
Fidrych has been out of action for
nearly a year with a shoulder ailment
that first cropped up in the summer of
1977 and then reoccurred last April in
his third start of the 1978 season.
Last Saturday, Tiger Manager Les
Moss told reporters it would be "at
least a couple weeks" before Fidrych
could be put to work in an exhibition
game. That timetable was upset ap-
parently due to Fidrych's progress in
conquering the shoulder ailment.
The righthander has had three
workouts at training camp, the most
recent Thursday morning, and Moss
said he improved with each time.
Exhibition Baseball
Detroit 8, Philadelphia 0
Boston 8, New York Mets 5
Kansas City 6, Toronto 1
Cincinnati 8, Chicago White Sox 1
Milwaukee 8, California 6
Texas 11, Los Angeles 4
San Francisco 11, Oakland 6
Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2
Cleveland 8, Chicago Cubs 2
Minnesota 12, St. Louis I
Seattle 9, San Diego 8
FINAL
CLEARANCE
SALE
75 KI JACKETS
famous makers
men's & ladies'
reg. $66 to $134
$33 to $67
50 VESTS
down fills
xsm to xlg
reg. $35 to $65
#19.95 to 29.95.
C a t . O F

Tigers

Dick Vitale.
Besides giving the Pistons their 27th
win of a frustrating season, the victory
also gave Vitale his first professional
victory over a New York team. "My
momma was down on her knees with
the rosary beads. Wouldn't you know it
wasn't on TV. I called everybody about
it and it wasn't on ... the people in Jer-
sey think I'm a fraud," said Vitale.
Playing like a championship ballclub,
Vitale's gang grabbed a 23-5 lead while
some fans were still looking for their
seats. But then the Pistons awoke from
their playoff dreams. They gave the
Knicks 13 more points before the quar-
ter was over.
The Pistons' problems continued
through the second quarter as the
Knicks led at the half, 64-59.
The Knicks, remembering their place
in the standings, watched their 11-point
lead collapse faster than Wall Street in
1929.
The Pistons grabbed the lead for good
*xi an Earl Tatum basket with 4:35 to
go x Detroit center Bob Lanier led the
Pistons with 21 points and 17 rebounds.
Playmaking guard Kevin Porter added
on 17 points and a game high 12 assists.
Ray Williams led the Knicks with 22.

I

Fidrych threw mostly fastballs
during 20 minutes of work yesterday.
Moss said Fidrych was obviously
pleased when told of the planned
exhibition game appearance on Sun-
day.
"When I told him he would work one
inning, he said, 'How about two?,' "
Moss said. "You know the Bird, he'd go
five if you let him."

I I

Final basketball stats

G-S \ Fg-FGA Pct. FT-FTA Pct.

McGee ................ 27-25
Hubbard.............26-26
Hardy ................. 27-16
MtBodnar............. 26-18
Smith............... 25-14
Johnson ..............214
Garner ............... 24-6
Staton ................. 25-16
Lozier ................. 25-4
Heuerman............. 27-6
Garris................. 9-0
Mk Bodnar.............9-0
MICHIGAN ........... 27
Opponents..........."27
" Includes team rebounds

207-454
154-311
114-213
110-195
47-106
45-91
23-46
46-100
21-49
19-49
3-5
2-8
791-1627
773-1664

.456
.495
.535
.564
.443
.495
.500
.460
.429
.388
.600
.250
.486
.465

97-146
77-128
20-29
16-21
37-52
7-10
10-20
15-19
18-26
26-39
0-1
0-1
323 492
326 459

.664
.602
.690
.762
.712
.700
.500
.789
.692
.667
.000
.000
.657
.697

Rbs Oavg. A
150 5.6 33
238 9.2 37
143 5.3 28
62 2.4 61
25 1.0 52
39 1.9 25
55 2.3 55
45 1.8 22
29 1.2 35
64 2.4 12
3 0.3 0
2 0.2 1
952* 35.3 361
958' 35.5 298

sti
20
29
7
32
7
14
8
25
17
19
0
1
149
149

PF-D
78-3
100-8
63-2
62-2
42-1
29-0
29-0
34-1
43-1
52-1
0-0
3-0
535-19
498-22

Pts.
511
385
248
236
131
97
56
107
60
64
6
4
1905
1866

Avg.
18.9
14.8
9.2
9.1
5.2
4.6
2.3
4.3
2.4
2.4
0.7
0.4
70.6
69.1

Hi
36
25
24
19
22
12
10
10
11
9
2
2
104
87

RECORD: 15-12 (Big Ten8-10) (Home: 9-4; Away: 5-7; Neutral: 1-1)

I

IT
P
II

4k4

MAYBE YOU CAN DO
SOMETHING DIFFERENT!
CONSIDER SPENDING T/30TH OF YOUR LIFE AS A PEACE CORPS OR
A VISTA VOLUNTEER. IT'S AN ADVENTURE BUT IT WON'T BE EASY;
IF YOU NEED PAMPERING THEN MAYBE YOU'D BETTER THINK OF
SOMFTHINL FS F. I UT IF YOll'RF CONCFRNFD ABOUT RASIC PROLRIFMS

sceepayb IVI(, uILIr a yHAKII Ir&tIV' J 'm si AVI

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