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March 15, 1979 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-15

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 15, 1979-Page 7

PROF. RAYMOND TANTER, the associate chairman of the Political Science Department discussed the importance of the
United States as a participant in the Mideast peacesettlement yesterday.
Profs doubtful of Mideast peace
(Continued from Page 1)

Egyptian oil, but didn't get it, and
Egypt gave up plans for linkage with
the Palestinian issue."
"This is a very asymmetrical
relationship since Israel is occupying
"lands claimed by Egypt," said
Gitelman. "Egypt can offer no land and
no resources; what it can give is nor-
mal relations. Only in the Arab-Israeli
conflict is that considered a con-
cession."
Henry said Egypt will lose the most
because of subsequent loss of support
from rich Arab countries. "Whatever
the final compromise is on linkage,

nothing will convince the other Arab
states that Egypt just hasn't sold
out . . . wealthy Arab countries will
find it hard to subsidize the Egyptian
economy."
ALL THREE professors agreed that
U.S. involvement in the Mideast will
escalate if the treaty is signed. "The
United States does seem to be heavily
committed," agreed Henry. "We are
buying the most expensive bit of ar-
bitration ever; it may cost $4 billion in
the next two years."
Gitelman said the American role in
the Mideast will definitely increase in

importance. "The U.S. will be the um-
pire for both parties in the inter-
pretation of the treaty. Also, both sides
will increase their military, political,
and economic ties to the U.S."
Tanter emphasized the shift in the
diplomatic style of the U.S. with regard
to the Mideast. "The United States.has
moved from being an ally and a
mediator to being a participant in the
Mideast. This is a triangular set of
negotiations - agreements between the
U.S. and Israel, the U.S. and Egypt, and
'Egypt and Israel. America is involved
on both sides."

Mideast
treaty
signing
in sight
(Continued from Page 1)
adversaries along the path of recon-
ciliation and toward future
cooperation."
EGYPT LAUNCHED a diplomatic
offensive to explain to friendly Arab
nations that its proposed treaty with
Israel was only one part of a com-
prehensive Middle East settlement,
foreign ministry officials said.
The drive was also aimed at stopping
a torrent of anti-Egyptian propaganda
underway in Kuwait and Jordan.
Arab countries and organizations op-
posed to the accord called for use of the
"oil weapon" and a boycott of U.S.
goods to underscore their protest.
U.S. officials predicted that signature
of the treaty would lead to a strategic
re-alignment in the Middle East which
would also reflect the changed situation
in Iran-no longer the West's
"policeman" of the Persian Gulf area.
There would be stepped-up
.cooperation between the United States,
Egypt and Israel. The U.S. would in-
crease its naval presence in the Middle
East and sharply increase military and
economic aid to Egypt, the officials
said.
Agreement
could mean
aid increase
(Continued from Page1)
and Egypt, plus $1 billion in economic
assistance to Egypt to finance such
things as telephones, roads and general
development.
Senate Democratic Leader Robert
Byrd said that in achieving the long-
sought peace breakthrough, Carter
"has earned himself a permanent place
in the efforts of peacemakers in human
history."
AND HE SAID whatever costs the
United States is calledon to bear will be
worth it, because "the costs of peace
have to be weighed against the cost of
war."
Meanwhile, the United States and
Egypt came under bitter attack yester-
day from much of the Arab world for
their moves toward an Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty.
There were calls from Iraq, Jordan,
Syria and Kuwait to put into action the
Baghdad Summit resolutions of last
November, which urge sanctions
against Egypt if a separate peace is
signed. The sanctions are secret, but
are believed to include a cut-off of all
Arab trade and oil.
From Moscow, Tass, the Soviet
Union's official news agency, accused
Egypt and Israel of competing for key
posts in a new military alliance with the
United States.

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TH1E WRITERS-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
at the RESIDENI AL COLEGE

4:
x.

presents a reading by:
ANSELM HOLL
poet, author of SOJOURNER MICROCOSMS
TUES., MARCH 20-8 p.m.
Bezinger Library/
East Quad rangIe
(East University between Hill and illard)
A reception for the poet will follow the reading.
,THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED
Mr. Hollo will be the guest at the Hopwood Tea, Thursday,
March 22, 3:00-4:30 pm, The Hopwood Room, 1006 Angell Hall.

The Residential College
made possible in part by
ment For The Arts.

Writers-in-Residence Program is
a grant from the National Endow-

A2group
(Continued from Page 1)
completes negotiations with the Poulos
family, owners of the theater.
Although Lotz maintained there are
no major stumbling blocks to the pur-
chase, he mentioned several problems
which have made it difficult to come to
an acceptable agreement. "We're
talking about $1 million," he said, "and
that's hard to get, especially when
people have to give it to you."
Lotz said contributions -have been
generous and many Ann Arbor residen-
ts have expressed concern about the
fate of the theater. Nevertheless, he
said some are hesitant to donate large
sums of money because they want
assurance that the city's plan to restore
the structure and make it a community
theater will succeed. "They want to
give, but they want to make sure it's
going to go," he added.
FIVE MEMBERS of the Poulos
family are relatives of the late Angelo
Poulos, who built the ornate theater as
a vaudeville house in'1928. Lotz said the
corporation has had difficulties dealing
with the family because Poulos'
children are scattered across the coun-
try and his widow lives in Greece.
According to Lotz,* each of the family
members must individually agree to
any settlement and the family does not
have legal counsel representing them.
In addition, Lotz said only one of the
family members is presently well-off
financially.
"We write to all of them, but they
don't answer," Lotz said. Poulos'
widow did, however, come from Greece
for several weeks to negotiate, but she
has since returned and no agreement
was reached during her visit.
LOTZ AND THE members of the in-
corporating committee are not
discouraged. "There's no bad news, not
even bad feelings," Lotz said. "We're
working on different angles, lots of
angles." He said the family is anxious
to come to an agreement.
John Hathaway, another member of
the incorporating committee stated
there was "a clear understanding of
-positions" between the negotiators. He
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iopes to saN
said that during one of the meetings,
"there was a shaking of hands all
around and agreement on principles."
According to both Hathaway and Lot-
zI, there are no other major bidders for
the theater. Hathaway said he does not
think any other group is in a position to
make a better offer and Lotz said, "I
don't think any commercial group is
crazy enough to step into a civic
situation."
LOTZ SAID commercial groups in-
terested in purchasing the theater fear
public condemnation if they prevent the
city from carrying out its resoation
plans. As an example, Lotz said that
Jacobson's had been interested in con-
verting the theater into a department
store but "dropped it like a hot potato"

re theater
after the city made its intentions clear.
Lotz and Hathaway said the theater
would rapidly deteriorate if it were left
empty when the Butterfield lease ex-
pires. In addition to physical
deterioration, they said once the public
stops visiting the theater and thinking
of it as a center for community enter-
tainment, it will be difficult to rekindle
public interest. Therefore, the pair
believes the Michigan Theater should
remain open at all costs.
Lotz said that the Detroit-based But-
terfield company, which has rented the
theater since it was built, was initially
going to move out Dec. 31 last year. The
date was then moved back to March 31
at the city's urging, and has now been
tentatively extended until April 30.

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