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March 13, 1979 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-13

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 13, 1979-Page 5
Natural foods workers organize new union

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By RICK BLANCHARD
Amidst disappearing benefits, in-
secure working conditions and non-
recognition by the management, the
workers at the Midwest Natural Foods
Distributing Co. of Ann Arbor are in the
process of giving birth to a new labor
union, the United Midwest Workers
(UMW).
After three weeks of worker-
management negotiations and
organizational meetings in February,
the UMW, has been forced to file a
petition with the National Labor
Relations Board (NLRB) because of
the management's refusal to recognize
the existence of the union.
DENISE RICKMAN, member of the'
UMW's organizing, publicity, and
outreach committees, said yesterday,
"We are looking to define the working
conditions of 61 non-supervisory people
at the company."

I

Midwest Natural Foods, recently
bought by Balanced Foods of New York
City, is located at 170 April Dr. and is
one of the Midwest's largest wholesale
natural food distributors.
"When the company was acquired by
the new owners, we felt ; a lack of
security or concern for the workers' in-
terests," said Rickman. "There was -a
shifting of rules and benefits, such as
the quiet elimination of a Cost of Living
Allowance (COLA), that made us feel
neglected and tucked away from recent
developments."
ON MARCH FIFTH, the organizing
committee, in accordance with NLRB
guidelines requiring 30% or more sup-
port of the people desiring represen-
tation, presented the management with
a petition containing 45 of the 61 (or 75
per cent) qualified signatures asking
for its recognition of the union.
"The union is not directed against the

management, but is an attempt to
define and better the conditions of em-
ployees," continued Rickman.
A spokesman for management said
they wanted to offer a "better alter-
native, without all the legal guidelines"
that would arise from an organized
union. According to the spokesman, "it
would be a complicated mess of in-
volvement that really would not help."
The management considers the of-
fering of a "legally binding contract"
that would contain a signed and dated
statement of policy to be a situation as
"beneficial as a union."
THIS HAS CAUSED some confusion,
said Rickman. "Their lawyers say it
would be binding for the management
in that they could not arbitrarily
change policy, but according to NLRB
lawyers, there is nothing in the tontract
to stop them."
As of Friday of last week, the

management of Midwest Natural Foods
has not recognized the union, "so we
have taken the next legal step," said
Rickman, "and filed our petition with
the NLRB who will review the case and,
if there are no jurisdictional problems,
send an official to hold an election at
Midwest. At that point the decision as to
whether the union can be certified is up
to the NLRB."
BAD AXE, Mich. (AP)-A Harbor
Beach man has discovered that if
you're going to speed, it pays to know
where you're going.
Huron County sheriff's deputies said
yesterday a speeder who tried to avoid
a pursung patrol car by turning off the
highway picked the wrong driveway.
As the pursuing patrol car sped by
Sunday night, the owner of the home
came out to investigate the car sitting
in his driveway.

'U o A SchooQ o Auste
antd '-ULAC pheent:
a Soire
Alarch 17, 1979
Ilkhigan ('iTion
balroom
9.0 .pn t11am
$7.50 perc ouple
$4.00 per single
T und-aoising event
gickebs on safe -Mach 12 at
Jieket entnaQ and the -Muste Scoo

V/

I

Voyager shows

Jupiter close up

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
Yet another chapter was added to the
National Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration's (NASA) book of historic
encounters with our Solar System's
outer planets last week as the first of
two Voyagaer spacecraft made its
closest approach to the planet Jupiter.
Voyager I sailed to within 172,000
miles of the colorfully cloudy planet
and began transmitting brilliantly
detailed and never-before-seen pictures
back to .scientists and the Jet
Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif.
THREE DAYS after its closest ap-
proach and while on its way to Saturn,
Voyager discovered a ring of gas and
dust resembling Saturn's, around
Jupiter.
While sailing near the largest planet
in our Solar System the 18,000-pound
spacecraft was pointing its television
cameras not at Jupiter, but at one of

Jupiter's biggest and rockiest moons,
Io.
Io, about the size of our own moon, is
a major part of Voyager's exploration
of Jupiter's four other moons. Scientists
want to determine precisely how many
moons Jupiter has as well as getting
detailed photographs of the planet's
three closest moons-Io, Ganymede
and Callisto.
ATMOSPHEREIC AND Oceanic
Science Department chairman Thomas
Donahue is actively involved in the
Voyager project, as well as other NASA
unmanned missions. The noted scien-
tist is assembling various experiments
and serving on various teams studying
the collective data. '
Voyager I used Jupiter's tremendous
gravity to propel it to a line of travel
where it could photograph those moons.
NASA scientists are anxiously awaiting
those pictures.

The unmanned spacecraft's exotic
itinerary put the closest approach to
Jupiter at 4:42 a.m. PST, but Voyager,
flying at 81,000 miles per hour, actually
was crossing that point more than half
an hour earlier because it takes the
radio signals more than 37 minutes to
travel the 420 million miles to Earth.

Voyager I's sister ship, Voyager II
launched later and traveling slower
than Voyager I, is due at Jupiter around
June 9. If after sailing past Io and the
other 'moons its systems are still intact,
scientists will send Voyager to Saturn
to study its famous "rings."

TEACH IN JAPAN
Anyone with a bachelor's degree in different engineering fields,
production/manufacturing, quality control, materials management or
procurement wishing to teach full-time for one or two years in Japan
should write to: Personnel Director, International Education Services,
Shin Taiso Building, 10.7, Dogenzaka 2-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150,
Japan.
The position involves teaching Japanese businessmen and engineers the basic vocabulary in various
fields. No Japanese-longuge is required for classroom instruction. Teaching experience is not required.
An orientation is given in Tokyo.
Information on salary, transportation and housing can be obtained by providing International Education
Services with a detailed resume and a letter indicating an interest in the position.
Personal Interviews will be held IN YOUR AREA between the middle
to the end of April.
Selected applicants would be expected to arrive in Tokyo from June through September, 1979.
NfSA 19 79-80
The Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) Annual Elections will be
held April 2, 3, 4, 1979. All seats
up for election.
Candidate filing forms are avail-
able now at the MSA- Offices, 3909
Michigan Union.

millic
that
cuts
capita
Ho
trio
The
Neur
tant,
of a

while we were out.. .
(Continued from Page 1).
ioas opposed to the $22 million week in Washtenaw County Circuit
t ous pprovCeourt. Neither the defense nor the
tould be $6 million for nurse prosecutor dispute that Aparicio shot
woldb $ mlion fo nus Donald Koos five times with a .38
caliber gun during what Aparicio
spi tal murder remembers to be a chance encounter in
the hall between the two offices.
Thee psychiatrists and a psychologist
trial of a University Hospital called by the prosecutor have testified
o-Psychiatric Institute accoun- that while Aparicio often demonstrated
William Aparicio, for the murder symptoms of emotional , and
co-worker fast July opened last psychological stress, he was not men-
taltiss or insane.

E. Ann may be labelled historic

(Continued from Page 1)
landmark.
According to Greenberg, one of the
reasons the homeowners wanted to
designate the block an historic district
was to facilitate the development of
more single family homes. "What do
the renters do then?" said Greenberg.
"Ann Arbor should be careful of not
overdoing its creation of historical
districts."
If the "Ann Street Historic Block" is
adopted by council, its immediate ef-
fects, however, would be primarily
structural. The report lays out a list of
guidelines detailing the preservation
standards of specific physical elements
of the houses such as roofs, openings,
porches and trim. For instance, in or-
der to preserve the streetscape con-
sistency created by the relationship of
roof heights and shapes, the report
states that "the existing building
heights, roof lines, gables, pitch, and
chimneys shall not be changed or
modified."
THE REPORT also gives a number
of restoration recommendations which
Mtichian
:4I3atg
is preserved on
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard Street
AND
Graduate library

are not legally binding. The report
"strongly encourages" restoration but
suggests that any necessary
replacement with new material be
visually identical to the original.
The issue of creating the "Ann Street
Historic Block" has been in the making
since July 6, 1977 when council appoin-
ted the Division Street Historic District,
a study committee consisting of
Historic District Commission members
and Ann Street homeowners.
According to Louise Pieper, the staff
director of the Historic District Com-
mission, the project was spurred by
rumors that the Campus Inn was plan-
ning to demolish the house at 610 E. Ann
to extend its parking lot. "This didn't sit
very well with the residents in the area.

It created a sense of urgency and con-
cern over the particular area of Ann
Street,"said Pieper.
Although the committee had
originally been charged with deter-
mining the feasibility of extending the
present Division Street Historic
District to include the 500-600 block of
East Ann Street, concern over the
preservation of the specific area led the
committee to consider it as a single
unit, unique in its historic value.
"East Ann Street is a special area,
presenting different issues than other
places," said Clan Crawford, a member
of the committee. "The idea was to
treat the entire block as one historic
monument. Each house is part of the
whole and the whole is what has value."

THE U-M CENTER FOR
AFROAMERICAN AND
AFRICAN STUDIES
PRESENTS
"WHITE POWER IN RHODESIA: RISE
AND FALL(?) OF THE RHODESIAN
FRONT,"
W.~ith
DR. HASU PATEL
Visiting Professor
Yale University
MARCH 14-12-1:30 P.M.
346 Old A a D BLDG.
909 Monroe St.

1979, 4:30 P.M.
BE A PART OF INFLUENCE

22,

The Michigan Student Assembly is the alt-campus
student government of The University of Michigan.

, ii

*k America 's longest Running Musical *
THE FANTASTICKS
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
March 15; 16, 17-8 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT-332 S. State St.
TICKETS $3 AT THE DOOR
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud. A
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
ALICE, SWEET ALICE
(Alfred Sole, 1977) 5:30 only-AUD. A
This horror thriller opened to ecstatic reviews in London. Hitchcock-like, the
film interweaves the acts of a psychotic killer with the symbolic human sac-
rifice of the Catholic Church conimunion. An unusual and frightening work.
With BROOKE SHIELDS, LILLIAN ROTH, and ALPHONSE (400 lbs.) de NOBLE. {
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
THE CRAZIES
(George Romero, 1973)T. 10:00 only-AUD. A
Another shock fest patterned after Romero's NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD.
The townspeople of Evans City drink contaminated water which alters their
mental state into murderous, raving crazies. Don't blame us if you stay up all
night! ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
Tomorrow: Bertoluccls LAST TANGO IN PARIS

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