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March 01, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-01

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iIFOU _6E W MALL W D L
Punctuation point
Observant English professor Bert Hornback yesterday noticed a
grammatically incorrect sign posted on the Diag and sent the
following letter to the Daily: "The sign on the Diag announces "Young
Republican's Mass Meeting.' Can one Young Republican have a Mass
Meeting? Is there only one Young Republican on campus? Maybe
there are plenty of Republicans, but only one Young Republican? Are
Republicans by definition old? If so, maybe they should have a Mas's
Meeting. (Moral: A Young Republican's Club is Mightier than his
Pen.)" Perhaps the University should offer a special English camp
class for Young Republicans.
Leghorn libido
Students in Prof. Hugh Gilmore's Anthropology 322 lecture were
treated to a history lesson yesterday in addition to his remarks on the
social behavior of primates. While discussing mating periods in
animals, Gilmore explained the "Coolidge effect" and its origin. It
seems President Calvin Coolidge's wife visited a farm one day and
noticed a rooster and hen mating. She was told the rooster repeated
the act almost 20 times daily. After taking in this information, she
inquired whether or not her husband knew of this kind of occurence.
Some time later, President Coolidge visited the same farm and wit-
nessed a rooster and her in a similar position. He was told about the
rooster's propensity for mating, and when he asked if it always was
with the same hen, he was told no. After a moment, Coolidge asked if
his wife had heard about the rooster's amazing libido. Get Freud to
explain this one.
Security?
Adding to the confusion during Tuesdady night's lengthy Michigan
Student Assembly (MSA) meeting, several frustrated and
mischievous members of the Assembly hid President Eric Arnson's
gavel after he left Assembly chambers for a break. Arnson returned,
and much to his consternation, found the gavel missing. However, Ar-
nson soon discovered he was able to conduct the meeting without the
prized gavel, although many problems were not hammered out.
Whodunit
Snowballs, oranges, ice cream cones, and water balloons are normal
artillery in fights between South and West Quad dorms, but gunshots
are "quite out of the ordinary," according to security Services
Manager David Foulke. The Ann Arbor Police have no suspects, and
the gunshot incident continues to stir up rumors of South Quad in-
volvement. Although proximity, angle of bullet, and dorm rivalry may
point the uncertain finger at South Quad as the source of a .38 caliber
slug that blasted the window of a West Quad dorm room last Thursday
night, "there has been no evidence to substantiate this claim," said
Foulke. "Judging from the spent velocity of the bullet, it may have
come from a distant source or ricocheted several times before it hit.
the window," Foulke added. Security i seeking witnesses from both
dorms Who may have seen or heard the gun blast.
Happenings
FILMS
A-V Services-Industrial Pollution, 12:10 p.m., SPH II.
Cinema Guild-King Kong, 7,9:15 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Clockwork Orange, 7, 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Bldg.
PERFORMANCES
Studio Theatre-Vanities, and Talk to Me Like the Rain and Let Me
Listen, 4:10 p.m., Arena Theatre, Frieze.
Music School Symphony Orchestra, 8 p.m., Hill.
Harp Students Recital, 8p.m., Recital Hall,School of Music.
SPEAKERS
Dept. of Romance Languages-Prof. Sara Melzer (UCLA),
"Classical Discourse and Classical Ideology in the Pensees", 7:30
p.m., East Lecture Room, Rackham.
Center for AfroAmerican and AfricanStudies-Robert Williams,
"Blacl Activism and Black Politics," 10 a.m.: Dr. James Turner,
"Black Studies, Retrospect and Prospect," 2 p.m.; Dr. M. Ron
Karenga, "The Fundamental Crisis in Black Life; Analysis and Alter-
natives," 8 p:m,-All in Schorjing Auditorium, School of Education.
Museum of Anthropology-Aram Yengoyan, "Myth and Symbol in
Aboriginal Australia," 1109 Geddes.
Natural Resources/Landscape Arch.-Albert Rutledge, "Most Con-
struction Diagnosis: Plugging the People In", 7:30 p.m., Rackham
Amph.

Center for Study of Higher Education-Harold Hidgkinson, "A
Comparative Critique: Higher Education in USSR and People's
Republic of China," 3 p.m., East Conference Room, Rackham.
MISCELLANEOUS
Romance Lang.-Genes, reading of French play, 8 p.m., Pendleton
Room, Michigan Union.
Michigan Economics Soc.-benefit dance, raffle, 7:30 p.m., Don
Cisco's.
Guild House-Simone Press and Anca Vlasapolis, poetry readings,
7:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
International Night-Middle eastern Manu, 5 p.m., League
Cafeteria.;
Michigan Economics Society-Meeting, 5 p.m., Room 301,
Economics.
MARC Colloquium Series-T. Garbaty, "The Uncle/Nephew Motif
in Folklore and Literature: an Interdisciplinary Approach, noon, 203
Tappan.
Ad Hoc Committee for Peace in Vietnam-March for peace in Viet-
nam from the Diag to the Federal Building, noon.
Correction
In yesterday's story on the Michigan Student Assembly (MS'A)
debate on the University Cellar, it was incorrectly reported that the
Assembly was discussing whether or not to direct MSA appointees to
the Cellar Board of Directors to take action on negotiating
management structure with the employees. The assembly actually
'passed a resolution which set up a committee to discuss whether the
issue is -negotiable and which directed the Board to delay im-
plementation of a managerial structure until MSA decides on March
20.
Take Ten
On March 1, 1969 University researchers and scientists said they
would not take part in an upcoming nationwide campus research

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 1, 1979-Page 3
THIRD PARTY ROLE ADOPTED -

MSA to hear 'U' Cellar

By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
After lengthy debate Tuesday night,
the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA)
voted to establish an ad hoc committee
to hear management, employee, and
student arguments for and against
negotiating a settlement between
workers and management over a new
hierarchical structure for the Univer-
sity Cellar.
Since MSA appoints a majority of the
members on the Cellar Board of Direc-
tors, it indirectly controls Cellar
managerial policy.
THE COMMITTEE will report to the
Assembly on March 20, and the Assem-
bly will then make a decision on
whether or not to require the MSA
appointees on the Board to negotiate.
The Assembly also voted to require its
appointees to block the management
structure until the March 20 meeting.
While Cellar workers want to play a
larger role in the decision-making
policies of the bookstore, management
wants to institue a structure with no

negotiation with employees. The
management ha given employees until
March 8 to submit written ideas for
alternative management structures,
and the Board said it will make a final
decision at a March 13 meeting.
Some Assembly members have ex-
pressed doubts that all of their appoin-
tees will go along with MSA if it decides
to go with a negotiated settlement to the
dispute. MSA has the authority to with-
draw any of its appointees if they don't
respect its mandate.
THE RESOLUTION also deleted a
provision of last week's resolution
which advised the Board that all major
decisions in the Cellar should be subject
to negotiations with the employees and
their union.
Cellar employees came to MSA last
week asking that something be done to
give the employees a larger role in the
bookstore decision-making process.
MSA supported employees at that time
in urging student members of the Board
to negotiate.

The students defied the directive, ac-
cording to Cellar employee Deborah
Filler, and the employees wanted MSA
to give the students even stronger
directions.
"We don't know what they'll do, but
we hope they (MSA members) direct.
the student members that this is an
issue that must be negotiated," she
said.
JIM SULLIVAN, who presented the
resolution to the Assembly, said he felt
it necessary for MSA to hear all sides of
the issue and study the problem before
a recommendation can be made. He
also said that MSA does have the

views
authority to order student members
how to vote.
Jim Alland, vice president of person-
nel, said he was concerned that the
student interest on the Cellar Board is
not undermined.
"We're dealing with things that we're
not really informed on," he said. "I also
have a problem giving mandates to
committee~
Student Board member Nelson
Jacobson said he felt the Board has
been handling the problem well.
Jacobson said he was concerned that
MSA was making decisions without get
ting information, and was pleased with
its desireIto hear all sides.

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade soup and sandwiches 75C
FRIDAY, MARCH 2
Robert Hauert,
Office of Ethics and Religion:
"Reflections on a Recent Visit to Cuba"
GUILD HOUSE 802 Monroe

Ford returns, plans
Pol. sci, lectures

By JOHN SINKEVICS
Secret Service agents and hordes
of media types will be invading the
University campus again today, as
former President Gerald Ford
returns to his alma mater to lecture
to political science classes and meet
with graduate students.
Ford, an adjunct professor in
political science, will address 11
classes in three separate
sessions-two today and one
tomorrow-with his first appearan-
An aide to former President Gerald
Ford has told the Daily there is no
possibility Ford would accept an of-
fer to be president of the University.
ce scheduled for 9:00 this morning in
Rackham Auditorium.
THE FORMER President, a 1935
graduate of the Literary College
(LSA) who was a star center for the
Wolverine football team, will also
lead two graduate student seminars
on domestic and foreign policy
tomorrow morning.

Approximately 1,550 students are
expected to attend the lectures,
sponsored by the American Enter-
prise Institute's academic outreach
program on public policy issues. The
9:00 a.m. session today will include
students from five courses: In-
troductory Political Theory, Current
Issues in World Politics, and in-
troductory courses in American
politics, comparative politics, and
modeling political processes.
Ford will hold another session at
3:00 p.m. for students in public in-
ternational law, American foreign
policy process, and introductory
world politics. Only students who
are enrolled in these courses will be
allowed into the lectures, and strict
security precaution will be takeneto
screen those entering the
auditoriums.
Ford lectured to University
classes twice during 1977, and both
appearances attracted attention in
the national media-partially
because of his recent defeat in the
presidential election, and also since
the lectures were his first as an ad-
junct professor. Ford will hold a
press conference immediately
following his morning lecture.
EARN .SIX: CREDITS
WHILE EXPLORIT
WAWAII,
GEOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY STUDY
JUNE 25- AUGUST 2 1979
NON -CREDIT OP TONAL
WRTE FOR INFORMATION
OF'CE F 0 ERA NA T ES
EASERN M CH GAN UNVERSITY
PSANT I ICHIGAN 48;97
a s 487 2 2 .4,

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperstive presents at Nat. Sci.
Thursday, March 1
A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
(Stanley Kubrick, 1971) 7 & 9:15-NAT. SCI.
A bit of the in-out-in-out and the old ultra-violence. Very
horror show, this nightmare vision of the not-too-distant fu-
ture is perhaps Kubrick's best work. Best Picture, Best Direc-
tor, New York Film Critics Award. "A tour de force of extra-
ordinary images, music, words and feelings . . . dazzles the
-,senses and the mind."-N.Y. TIMES. Stars MALCOLM Mc-
DOWELL, PATRICK MAGEE.
MANN THEATRES ADMISSION
moTUAGSE TIA d ult $4.00
MAPLE VILLAGE 5HOPPING CENTER Aduld 24 00
769.1 3OO Child $2.00
Sorry, no passes on weekends
r YOU'LL BELIEVE A MAN CAN FLY SHOWTIMES
1:30, 7:00, 9:45
SUsERMAN 70,4945
SAT & SUN
PG Tickets on sale 15 min. prior to showtime 7:00, 945

" "BEST PICTURE
(OF THE YEAR"
- N Y FILM CRITICS
"I hope that this
blockbuster of a
film wins the
Academy Award for
best picture of 1978.

) J ,

TIIE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 126
'rhurmsday, March 1, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420.
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through A pril (2 semesters): $13 by
mail outside Ain Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
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$6.350 it Ann Arbor : $7.00 by mall out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
'HE MI(HIGAN IflY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor. M1 48109.

SHOWTIMES
MON-FRI
1:00, 8:00
Sat & SUN
1:00, 4:30, 8:00

i uiiy aeserves it.
\- AFFER DARK .Norma Mc a' 00o9-
a MRAkt~ . Eh~GiOaPaa SOa-WARNING- -_______
Due to the nature of tis him., under 17 redtures accompanlying Parent o0 Adult Gulttdnt There wiliDe strit adnerr\zncw ms o0010

Tickets on sale 30 min. prior to showtime

R

Cooper Schoedsack's

1933

KING KONG
BRUCE CABOT & FAY WRAY star in this greatest of horror fantasies. With
strong roots in the subconscious, Kong & Wray are popular extremes seized in
fatal attraction. Cooper & Schoedsock were masters of atmosphere-im-
porting doe-esque conviction to the dream-like events. Aided by the visceral
i Steiner score, we're showing the uncensored version.
SHORT: BOLVA NOVA-MARY CYUBLISKI & JOHN TINTORI.
Xerox Animation
FRI: Hitchcock's THE LADY VANISHES
SAT: Fonda & Sutherland in KLUTE

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Fm

-A! -%A T1

fir"

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS ADUTS FRI .,SAT.,SUN.
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT" EVE.AHOUDAYS $3.50
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED MON.THURS.EVt. S3,0
FOR PRICE OF ONE CHALDO1; $1.50
FRI. and SAT. LATE SHOW
STATE "UP iNSMOKE"

WHATYOU
KISE

I

If you smoke cigarettes,
you taste like one.
Your clothes and hair
can smell stale and
unpleasant, too.
You don't notice it,
but people close to you do.
Especially if they don't smoke.
And non-smokers are
the best people to love.
They live longer.

I

F

I

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