100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


IrYCU SE E Nlr HAPE CALL )ADLY
The ol'one-two punch
The only event to mar the success of Ann Arbor's first fling at punch-
card voting in last Monday's primary election was a rumor that 150
votes were not counted. That rumour has finally been put to rest. City
Clerk Al Vollbrecht distributed a memo to the mayor and City Council
Thursday night stating that 121 votes were not tabulated because they
were cast by persons who punched slots for two candidates running for
the same office. The other "missing" votes were cast by voters who
attempted to split their tickets - voting for both Republicans and
Democrats. Both practices are illegal. City hall officials remain con-
fident in the new system and are ready to give the punch-card another
whorl in April's city election.
Correction
Yesterday's story concerning dormitory reapplication lotteries
mistakenly stated the lotteries held Wednesday were for losers of the
initial dorm lotteries. Actually, the Wednesday drawings were the
initial lotteries for dorm residents wishing to return to the dorms next
year. There will be a second lottery April 3 at the University Housing
Office for those who did not enter the first lotteries, as well as for those
who did not obtain high enough priority to sign a lease.
Take ten
The Literary College Curriculum Committee on the evening of Feb.
24, 1969, unanimously recommended the establishment of an inter-
disciplinary concentration program in Afro-American studies to
become operational the following fall. The faculty would later spprove
the committee's recommendation in an April meeting. In addition to
creating five new interdisciplinary courses, a senior seminar,sand
three introductory survey courses, about 20 hours in already existing
advanced courses in several areas would constitute a major.
Happenings
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Friends of Eddie Coyle, 7, 9 p.m., MLB,
Aud. 3.
Cinema Guild-Blue Collar, 7,9:15 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Cinema II - Seven Per Cent Solution, 7, 9 p.m., Angell, Aud. A.
Mediatrics - Drive-In ,7, 8:30, 10 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Couzens Hall Film Co-op-F.M., 8, 10:15 p.m., Couzens Hall.
PERFORMANCE
Eclipse-Detroit Jazz Artists on Tour: Griot Galaxy, Sam Sanders
and Visions, Paradise Theatre Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-Stone, 8pm., 332S. state.
Music School - Contemporary Directions, 8 p.m., Rackham.
Russian Festival - Louis Nagel, pianist, 8 p.m., Museum of Art.
Musical Society - Founders Day Concert, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Ark-Michael Cooney, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Violin Recital-Joan Christenson, Recital Hall of Music, 2 p.m.
Flute Recital-Cleon Chapen, Recital Hall School of Music, 4 p.m.
Piano Recital-Suzanne Wilson, 6 p.m., Recital Hall, School of
Music.
Violin Recital-Dan Foster, 8 p.m., Recital Hall, School of Music.
SPORTS
Men's Basketball-U-M vs. Purdue, 4:05 p.m., Crisler.
Women's Basketball-U-M vs. Purdue, 5:15 p.m., Crisler.
Women's Basketball-U-M vs. Oakland, Crisler.'
Men's Gymnastics-U-M vs. Iowa, 8p.m., Crisler.
SPEAKERS
Church of Scientology - A taped lecture of L. Ron Hubbard, foun-
der of scientology, 7:30 p.m., Church of Scientology, Huron Valley
Mission, 809 Henry St.
ABENG-EMU Prof. Jose Llames, "Does the University Meet the
Needs of Hispanic Students?" 1 p.m., E. Quad, R.C. Aud.
Ann Arbor Art Association-Garo Antresian, "The History of
Lithographic Achievement in America," 1 p.m., 117 W. Liberty St.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rhyme Space-M. Clark, A. Nasopolos, M. Brown, poetry readings,
2 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Michigan Union.
Forum "Human Rights At Home: Repression of Labor in the United
States," 1-5 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. B.
Poetry Reading - 3 p.m., E. Quad, Benzinger Lounge, sponsored by
ABENG.
Fashion/Talent Show-E. Wuad, R.C. Aud., sponsored by ABENG.
T'ai C'hi Workshop-10 a.m.-4 p.m., Earhart Clubhouse.
Ann Arbor War Tax Dissidents-Brown bag lunch and planning
spring efforts to raise public consciousness about war taxes, noon,
First United Methodist Church, 602 E. Huron St., Wesley Lounge.
Canterbury Loft-Workshop in mime, movement, and im-
provisational theater, 10 a.m., 332S. State.

ACLU Forum - "The Rights of Minors," discussion with Diana
Autin, Keith Hefner, and Chris Roach, 8 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Bronze Elegance-A Fashion and Talent Extravaganza sponsored
by UAC and Alice LloydMinority Council, 8 p.m., Michigan Union
Ballroom.
Workshop-Ron English, guitarist, noon, Fraugm Bey, saxophonist,
Spencer Barefield, guitarist, noon, 1:30 p.m., 306 Burton Tower.
Musicians should bring instruments.
Eat may shorts ... sir
It was on y writing on the wall, nut officials at the U.S. Air Force
academy in Colorado took it-seriously. The 900-member senior class at
the academy, restricted to campus since Wednesday, were set free
yeserday when two unidentified senior cadets admitted to drawing an
unflattering caricature of a superior. The drawing of Brig. Gen.
Thomas Richards was posted on a dormitory wall earlier this week
with the caption: "King Richard-You can be as hard as you want, but
not for long." Supposedly, the commander was coming down a little
hard on the cadets. Officials said the guilty cadets probably will face
disciplinary action, but probably will still graduate this May.
Student government was never like
this
The University of Wisconsin recently held their studentgovernment
elections, and this term's winners decided to add a new twist to their
terms in office. To get things off to a jolly start, they campaigned in
clown suits. Then, as one of their many unusual campaign promises,
they brought the Statute of Liberty to Badgerland. Sound impossible?
Well, they did.. . in a sense. They made a 20-foot high facsimile out of
chicken wire, mesh lumber and painted plaster. The masterpiece cost
the student representatives $4,000 to put together, which they got from
the student government's $80,000 budget. Most students were
"outraged" by the incident and the representatives admitted they
abused the powers of office but were just sticking to their campaign
promises. The student representatives also has plans tofloodthe,
school's football stadium and hold mock naval battles. What will they

--,-

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, February 24, 1979-Page 3
LA WMAKERS CHANGE THEIR MINDS
More states raise drinking age

BOSTON (AP) - The Vietnam era
saw 18 states accept the argument "old
enough to fight, old enough to be an
adulte" - and, in the process, drop the
drinking age to 18.
Now, after years of rising teen-age
alcoholism, lawmakers in several
states have changed their minds.
MASSACHUSETTS, where the
Senate has acted to raise the age to 19
and the House wants to raise it to 21,
will likely become the sixth state to
reverse itself after lowering the
drinking age in the early 1970s.
Maine and Michigan have already
restored former age limits of 20 and 21,
respectively. Minnesota, Montana and
Iowa compromised at 19.
Throughout the nation, advocates of a
lower drinking age say teen-age
drinking can't be controlled by law. But
many feel differently.
"THERE ARE people within the field
who feel the restriction will lessen
abuse of alcohol," said Paul Garner, a
National Institute of Alcohol Abuse
spokesman. "But no agreement has
been reached."
Yesterday, the debate in
Massachusetts illustrated the kind of
dialogue going on in other states .where,
when federal law lowered the voting
age to 18, state legislatures followed
suit. Massachusetts was one of 18 that

lumped the right to drink with the right
to vote.
But soon after it took effect on March
1, 1973, the new limit became a favorite
target of police, the Registry of Motor
Vehicles, and high school principals.
They blamed it for aggravating \
problems related to teen drinking -
problems already there, but to a lesser
degree.
"WE FEEL IT was a disaster," said
Mike Donovan, an assistant to Boston's
police commissioner. "Not only have
auto accidents and fatalities increased,
but it has also created a very serious
increase in vandalism and crimes
associated with street gangs."
Donovan said vandalism grew to
"epidemic proportions" by last sum-
mer. Special patrols were created to
break up gangs of young rowdies
hanging out - and drinking - on
streetcorners and parks.
"If you talk to people who live across
the street from parks, they'll tell you
the quality of life definitely went down
since the drinking age was lowered,"
Donovan said.
MANY PEOPLE between the ages of
18 and 21 had been drinking long before
the lowered age went into effect - of-
ten, for example, when college seniors

_ _ _ _ 4

would buy liquor for underclassmen.
But now, high school officials say,
there has been a "trickle down effect"
in which the seniors buying for friends
have been seniors in high school - and
their friends have been as young as 14.
"You could almost pinpoint drinking
problems in the younger kids to the
time they lowered the drinking age,"
said Carmen Rinaldi, headmaster at
Brookline High School. "Monday mor-
nings became very difficult for students
who spent the weekend getting bom-
bed."

ONE ARGUMENT used by those who
want to raise the age is that there has
been a jump in fatal traffic accidents
tied to teen-age drinking. Nobody
disputes that there has been an in-
crease, but opponents say the jump has
not been as dramatic as the other side
paints it.
The Registry of Motor Vehicles'
figures are the ones most often cited by
those who want the age lowered: Last
year, 105 drivers under 21 had been
drinking when involved in fatal ac-
cidents, as compared with 38 in 1971.
Meanwhile, the total of under-21 drivers
in fatal accidents rose from 232 to 301.
The total of all highway deaths drop-
ped.
Those who want to raise the age say
the figures show a 150 per cent increase
in deaths of teen-agers who drank and
drove. Opponents cite the increase in
alIteen fatalities - a less dramatic 30
per cent-rise.
Even critics of lowering the drinking
age concede that changing the law

without taking other steps would do lit-
tle to solve the problems.
The National Institute for Alcohol
Abuse says 95 per cent of teen-age boys
have experimented with alcohol by the
time they reach 18, whatever the law
says, and girls will soon be at the same
level.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 122
Saturday, February 24, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mor6-
ings during the University year at 420
Ma ynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscriptionrates:.
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-'
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes: to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
WIN LAS VERAS
at DON CISCO'S
(3 days-2 nights)
The Michigan Economics Society
presents a benefit dance and raffle
THURSDAY, MARCH 1.
TICKETS $2 at Fishbowl, 38 Econ.
Building, or MES member.
Disco & Rock 'n Roll

State ed. officials hold
meeting, discuss budget

BY AMY SALTZMAN
In an effort to "find out what the
people in the educational community
are thinking," a state Senate subcom-
mittee and the state Department of
Education held a public hearing in town
yesterday to discuss Gov. William
Milliken's budget proposals for the
department.
Those proposals may include a cut of
up to $30 million in the total state
education budget of $354 million.
STATE SENATE Appropriation Sub-
committee ,on School Aid Chairman
Kerry Kammer (D-Pontiac) described
the hearing - one of eleven such
gatherings to be conducted during the
next three weeks across the state - as
a means of "soliciting criticism" from
the public.
During the hearing, held in the city
library's Main Board Room, Ann Arbor
School Superintendent Harry Howard
said a primary concern of his was that
the requirements of bilingual students
wouldn't be met.
The city, according to Howard, hasn't
had the money to properly teach
foreign speaking students. He men-
tioned the North Campus area - where

700 of these students live, in public
housing with only a $100,000 subsidy
from the University - as particularly
distressing.
HOWARD SAID the uncertain effects
of the Headlee amendment may further
curtail funding in this area.
In general, Howard said, the roll-
back provisions of Headlee could lead
to severe cuts in state educational
programming.
But neither Howard nok Kammer
described the specific effects of
Headlee. "The one thing we know for
sure about Headlee is that we really
don't know anything at all," quipped
Kammer.
Another major concern of Howard's
was in the area of school evaluations.
Howard said assessment testing can
create problems since schools con-
tinually scoring poorly are often
ridiculed and stigmatized.
"The three schools in Ann Arbor that
are at the bottom of the list in terms of
achievement will probably remain that
way no matter what we put into them. I
believe in assessment but because of
the public scorn placed on those who
are last, the process may be self-
defeating," Howard said.

The Ann Arbor Film ooperative presents at MLB 3
Saturday, February 24
THE FRIENDS OF EDDIE COYLE
(Peter Yates, 1973) 7 only-MLB 3
Sadly relegated to a "second feature" status almost immediately after its
release, this film about the last days of family man and small-time hood
Eddie Coyle (ROBERT MITCHUM) is a powerful film indeed, with Mitchum
at the height of his talent.
THE GODFATHERS
(Francis Ford Coppola, 1972) 9 only-.-MLB3
Coppola's magnificent depiction of the transfer of power from one corrupt
generation to another is one of the great American films. The performances
from MARLON BRANDO, AL PACINO. JAMES CAAN, and ROBERT DUVALL
are perfection. Complete and uncut. "The greatest gangster picture ever
made."-Pauline Kael.
TUESDAY: John Carpenter's DARK STAR & ASSAULT ON
PRECINCT 13

I

WEDNESDAY IS1 MONDAY ADUETSVM.,VAT., SUN.
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT" EVE. XIDHATS s. .
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED ALL MATINEES E 2..
FOR PRICE OF ONE CHILD T 14 $1.5
Wayside Theatre FRIDAY & SAT MIDNIGHT SHOW
I 020 Wbshtenaw WALT DISNEY'S
Ypsilanti "Nlorh Avenue Iffoof/m

I iI

MON, TUES, THURS, FRI
7:00 & 9:25
SAT, SUN, WED 1-4-7-9:25

FRI.7 & 9:25
SAT. 1-3-5-7-9:25
SUN. & WED. 1-3-5-7-9
They, couldn't
have celebrated happier
anniversaries if they were
married to each other.
Ellen Alan
Burstyn Alda
"ame ime,
f lNext 'Year"

7

..,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan