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February 20, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-20

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Pale 2-Tuesday, February 20, 1979-The Michigan Daily
SymposiumOn Human Rights
In The USSR
-THE SOVIET PERSPECTIVE ON DISSENT-
Feb. 20 & 21, 1979 - University of Michigan
Tuesday, Feb. 20: 7:30 P.M.-Censorship in Soviet Literature
and Media," Igor Yefimov, Fiction Writer, Soviet Emigre 1978.
8:30 P.M.-"Anti-Semitism in the Soviet Press," Allan Alter,
Graduate Student in History, University of Michigan.
Wednesday, Feb. 21: 7:30 P.M.-Soviet Constitution and the
Rights of the Individual," George Ginsburgs, Rutgers Law
School.
Rackham Amphitheatre, Rackham Building
* Public Invited-FREE Admission *

Writer blasts

Soviet censorship

BY JOHN GOYER
Many Soviet intellectuals live silently
in the USSR - humiliated by the cen-

Do a Tree a.
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sorship about which they can do nothing
- according to Soviet writer Igor
Yefinov.
Yefinov spoke in Rackham Hall last
night before an audience of about 4C. He
was the first speaker in a three-day
"Symposium on Human Rights in the
USSR," sponsored by Action for Soviet
Jewry and Human Rights (AKTSIA).
SPEAKING SLOWLY in a rich
Russian accent, Yefinov described the
extent of Soviet censorship, using
examples from his own career and,
from the experiences of his friends.
Yefinov said that censors forbid the
expression of cultural differences

among the Russian peoples. I
"'Fhe system works because it can
use totalitarian means, because no
other information can reach the Soviet
people," said Yefinov. He said,
however, that there are now some radio
stations that are not jammed, such as
the BBC, Radio Free Europe, and a
West German station.
HE ALSO said that censors suppress
all news of crimes and natural disasters
- sometimes to the point where a huge
forest fire just outside of Moscow will
go unr'eported, even though everyone
can see the clouds of smoke.
Yefinov showed the audience the in-
ternational page of a Soviet newspaper,
which described Bulgaria as an exam-
ple of a true democracy. The largest
space was reserved for an article on the

suppression of human rights in the
United States. It was illustrated with
the picture of a homeless man asleep on
a street in Washington, D.C.
Yefinov said there are Soviet intellec-
tuals who see the censorship around
them, but who remain silent, because it
would be humiliating to admit that they
are a party to such a loss of print
freedom.
Yefinov said that 23 prominent Soviet
writers recently banded together to
write a collection of works entitled the
"Almanac Metropole," and that one of
two copies of the work smuggled out of
the Soviet Union will soon be published
by an Ann Arbor publishing house. He
said that because these writers have
risked their careers, there is hope for
freedom of censorship.

919

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Natural Science

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(Continued from Page 1)
Liberation Organization, was speaking
as he officially took oversthe former
Israeli diplomatic mission and
proclaimed it the office of the PLO in
Iran.
"We freed Iran today and we will do
the same with Palestine tomorrow,,,
Arafat said. "Under the leadership of
Ayatollah Khomeini and with the help
of Iranian freedom-fighters, we will
free Palestine."
THE GOVERNMENTS of the ousted
Shah of Iran, who maintained unofficial
diplomatic and trade relations with
Israel, accused the PLO and other
Palestinian groups of training and
financing some Iranian guerrilla
movements. These movements now
operate openly after playing an impor-
tant role in the revolution which ousted
the monarchy eight days ago.
Arafat, the first prominent visitor to
Iran since the revolution, said the
Palestinian and Iranian aims were
identical. "We will continue our efforts
until the time when we defeat im-
perialism and Zionism," he said.
Heavy fighting was reported last
week in Tabriz, 330 miles northwest of
Tehran. Up to 700 people were reported
killed when army units joined pro-shah
activists in battles against Khomeini's
forces.
IN THE MOST serious report of
violence reaching the capital, 14 people
were reported killed and five wounded
in a day-long battle near the north-
western town of Rezayieh, near Tabriz.
The fighting broke out Sunday in a
dispute between two tribes over the
distribution of weapons looted frori
police stations, reports from the area
said.
Armed robbers were reported stop-

disclosure
(Continued from Page 1)
certain credentials be satisfied for ad-
mission," Cairns noted.
HE ALSO CITED the lack of regard
for financial need in granting the
stipends as a fault of the law.
Economics and Social Work
Professor William Neenan opposed
Cairns' request, and told the Assembly
that revocation of the act would hurt in-
stitutions such as the University of
Detroit, which have high minority
enrollments.
He proposed an alternative to the
petition drive for a referendum on the
act: "A more appropriate way to act
would be to put pressure on the state
legislature to modify this act" so that it
would be based on financial need. "It is
niean-spirited of us to want its
removal," he said.

ping motorists on highways near the
southwestern oil cities of Abadan and
Ahwaz and in parts of Tehran.
The government sent troops to the
western province of Kurdistan amid
reports of unrest and a declaration of
"independence" among Kurdish
separatists.
In a statement broadcast over
Tehran Radio, Khomeini ordered his
forces to aid police and the army in
"maintaining law and order ... "
Khomeini said, "A group of bandits and
unlawful elements are taking advan-

tage q4 the situation and are making ef-
forts to pursue their evil objectives."
KHOMEINI, leader of the year-long
uprising that forced Shah Mohammad
Reza Pahlavi from power, did not
specify who the "bandits" were. But his
comments appeared directed at the
mix of common criminals and political
opponents now in possession of weapons
Also, Tehran newspapers reported
that three former military leaders, in-
cluding deposed Air Force Gen. Amir
Hossein Rabaei, were supposed to be
executed in the near future.

Senate passes salary

U.S. consulate in Iran set fire

proposal
The Assembly took no action on the
issue, leaving participation in the
petition drive up to individual mem-
bers
The Assembly also discussed a CESF
study on whether the University should
withdraw from participation in the
Social Security program. CESF Chair-
man Edward Gramlich explained that
the Univesity has the opportunity to
withdraw from the program, but must
decide soon before the opportunity ex-
pires.
Gramlich presented some data from
the unfinished report which predicts
that if current economic conditions con-
tinue, it would be advantageous for only
a few highly-paid faculty members t
withdraw from the system and inves
their pension funds elsewhere.

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Chinese suspend invasionI

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(Continued from Page 1)
"THE AMERICANS understood that
an attack by China on Vietnam,.
especially straight after the visit of
Teng Hsiao-ping, would place
Washington and all the other Western
"appeasers" of China in a highly am-
biguous and politically awkward
position," Bovin wrote.
Also, Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko yesterdaay renewed the
Kremlin's warning to China to with-
draw its forces from Vietnam "before it
is too late."
Echoing the words of a tough
statement issued Sunay in the name of
the Soviet government, Mr. Gromyko
said: "It should not be forgotten in
Peking thatthe heroic people of Viet-
nam is not alone. It has many friends
and allies in the whole world."

MEANWHILE, DEFENSE Secretary
Harold Brown said in Washington there
here signs of increased Soviet in-
telligence activity in the area and a
State Department spokeswoman said
nine Soviet ships were in the South
China sea near Vietnam.
She said the United States also was
conducting military exercises in the
South China sea.
But she declined to confirm or deny
reports that the United States had
deployed an aircraft carrier and other
ships to that area.

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This class offers the benefits of both indi-
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Enrollment is open to all University faculty,
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Improve your grades by learning how to
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This course is designed for those who want
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WRITER'S WORKSHOP
The workshop offers3 areas of instruction:

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2) Basic Skills Lab-Individualized program
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Daily
Official Bulletin
Tuesday, February 20, 1979
Daily Calendar
Physics/Astronomy: J. C. Collins, Princeton
Univ., "Renormalization of Electromagnetic Mass
Splittings," 1041 Randall, 4 p.m.; S. R. Nagel, Univ.-
Chicago, "Anomalous Transport Mechanisms in
Amorphous Metals," 2038 Randall; W. Hagen; Cen-
ter for Astrophysics, "Circumstellar Envelopes of M
Giants and Super Giants," 807 Dennison, 4 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 118
Tuesday. February 20.1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscriptionrates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
For Jewish CAMP COUNSELORS,
COUNSELORS TO BE,
THOSE INTERESTED IN TEACHING
AND SOCIAL WORK
WHAT-EWHERE-WHEN
TIME-Sundays, 2:30-5:00 p.m.
DATES-Feb. 25, March 18 & 25, April 1
PLACE-Concourse Lounge, Mary Markley
* Residence Hall
REGISTRATION
Please call the Hillel Office (663-3336) by Feb.
21 st to indicate you will be attendina.

Classes meet 6 consecutive weeks. Days & times available at registration.

HOW MUCH?
$25.00
(payable by check only)'
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WHEN?

Registration
Wed. & Thurs., February 21 &.22
R- 0a m .-4:00 P.M

WHERE?
1610 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor
(near Hill St.)
Phone: 764-9481

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