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February 08, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-08

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:Page 6-Thursday, February 8, 1979-The Michigan Daily
The Ann Ar r Film Cooperative presents at Aud A
' Thursday. February 8
CRIES AND WHISPERS
(Ingmar Bergman, 1972) 7 & 8:40-AUD A
Considered by many to be Bergman's masterwork. The imminent death of a
woman brings her two sisters and faithful servant to her side. Within this
frame, Bergman hauntingly explores family, devotion, love, pain, and the
constan-t mingling of life' and death. "It stands alone and reduces almost
everything you are likely to see to the size of a small cinder."-Vincent
Canby, N.Y. Film Critics Award: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Writer, Best
Screenplay. With HARRIET ANDERSON, INGRID THULIN, LIV ULLMAN, ERLAND
JOSEPHSOW. In Swedish, with subtitles.
THE VELVET VAMPIRE
(Stephanie Rothman, 1971) 10:20 only-AUD A
Bizarre horror flick for those who want a little after hours action. A sexy,
125 year-old woman, the mistress of a remote ranch in the Southwest, stocks
her own bloodbank with tourists who spend the night. "Audiences loudly,
freely, and obscenely associate with the action on the screen."-N.Y.
TIMES. ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
Tomorrow: ERASERHEAD and
NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD

University alumnus James retuns to campus

Jazz keyboardistaBob James, a
University alumnus and a veteran of
sessions with such people as with
Maynard Ferguson and Sarah
Vaughan, will return to his alma
mater this Sunday. James will per-
form at 8:00 p.m. in Hill Auditorium,
in a concert sponsored by Eclipse
Jazz.
Following his performance,
James will spend a week in residen-
cy on campus, holding workshops
with musicians and non-musicians,
and working with the University
Jazz Band. His schedule includes
these appearances: Monday,
February 12, 3:30-5:30 p.m. -
Arranging and Composing I, 2043
School of Music; 6:00-7:30 p.m. -
Rehearsal with University Jazz
Band; Tuesday, February 13, 1:30-'

2:30 p.m. - Composition - Advan-
ced, 2038 School of Music; 3:30-5:30
p.m. - Arranging and Composing
II, 2038 School of Music.
AT HIS concert Sunday evening,
James will perform with an all-star
group of jazz musicians. Included in
the unit will be drummer Steve
Gadd, guitarist Eric Gele, redd man,
David Sanborn, and Randy and
Michael Brecker, on trumpet and
saxophone respectively.
James has made his biggest mark
on jazz not as an instrumentalist,
however, but as an arranger. After a
stint with his friend Quincy Jones'
band, James was introduced to
Creed Taylor, president of CTI
Records Company. Working with
CTI, James wrote for such
musicians as Hubert Laws, Grover

Washington, Stanley Turretme,
and Gabor Szabo. Since he leftTI,
James has played on many altar
sessions.
Tickets for James' show this in-

day are $7.50, $6.50, and $5.50. They
are available at the Union box office,
Schoolkid's Records, and both
Discount Records stores.

Angry famers boo
Secre tar) Bergland

THESE ARE THE ARMIES
OF THE NIGHT.
They are 100,000 strong.
They outnumber the cops five to one.
They could run New York City.

WASHINGTON (AP)-Jeered an
booed by angry farmers, Agricultur
Secretary Bob Bergland softl3
apologized yesterday to anyone in-
sulted by his suggestion that some far-
mers demonstrating for more gover-
nment aid are "driven by just old-
fashioned greed."
Bergland did not withdraw his
remark, however, and he reiterated his
opposition to increasing crop price sup-
ports and insisted that 1978 "in virtually
every respect . .. was a good year" for
rural America.
OUTSIDE, THE city's worst snowfall
in years made conditions even rougher
for those of the 3,500 American
Agriculture movement farmers who
were sleeping by their tractors in their
compound on the Mall west of the
Capitol.
Nonetheless, they paraded 030 trac-
tors around the Capitol, with police
permission, filling the air withi the den,
se smell of diesel smoke.
More than 300 farmers crowded into
the House Agriculture Committee
hearing to hear Bergland. Rep. Richard
Nolan (D-Minn.) told Bergland that he
had been "greatly shocked and distur-
bed" by the secretary's remarks
Tuesday.
L ohannctrauss
-
February .77101
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THEATRE BOX
OFFICE Mon.-Tues. 11-6; Wed.-Sat. 11-8
e de ohnheatie

"YOU OWE THEM an apology,"
Nolan said.
The farmers roared agreement and,
one jumped to his feet demanding,
"Have him do it right now!"
Rep. Thomas Foley (D-Wash.),
hairman of the panel, threatened to
ave the man ejected.
HALF AN HOUR later, however,
'ten a member of the committee
MAogized to chief Agriculture Depar-
tI~nt economist Howard Hjort for
rearks to him at a hearing last year,
Beland offered his apology for ill
feeAgs generated by his words.
"vant to take this, opportunity to
apollize to anyone who has, felt in-
sulteby anything I've said. It was not
intenid," he said.
The.otesters did not seem to notice.
THErUSS CONCERNED a remark
Berglal made in a telephone inter-
view Tisday. He said some farmers
from we Texas to Nebraska were in
"real trogle,"then added: "There are
others w, have made bad business
judgment paid too much money for
land. I k)wsome people in that
category. ters are seeking publicity
and othersare driven by just old
fashioned gId."
After the daring, Joseph McDavid,
the departmq's press secretary, said
Bergland wasot backing down.
"We just fekhat it was unfortunate
that it was tale in such a way to in-
clude innocen farmers," McDavid
said. "He standby his statement that
some of the demmostrators are
motivated by gred."
FRESHMAN RP. Marvin Leath (D-
Texas) later issud a sttement saying
Bergland had "rpeatek that insult"
and called for his rsignaon.
Rep. Richard Illy (,-Fla.) drew
hissing when he junped ' Bergland's
side, saying, "Thee area lot more
political forces in he wod than are
represented in this room and a lot
more common sene. Yo represent
that."
Bergland did tonedown e original
draft of his testimon:. Afteiieclaring,
for example, tht 197ofhad bin a good
year for the farner, h extem-
poraneously added: 'but keo in mind
that 1977 was a disastr for m~ay."
The secretary's apearate drew
security measures ustally resrved for
presidential visits to the Caitol, in-
cluding the mounting f cameos on the
roof.
Join ~he
Dai'y
Business

Staf

j.a.a. to[kien's 9:2
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