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February 07, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SURVIVAL OF CENTER THREATENED

'U' 'abandons child care center

By STEVE HOOK
University officials decided yesterday
not to, assit the Child Care Action
Center (CCAC) in finding a new
home-a move that discourages hope
for the survival of the campus-based
day care center.
The center, located on the third floor
of the School of Education building, has
been ruled unsafe by state fire inspec-
tors under special guidelines for such
facilities. The tentative closing for the
self-supporting center is scheduled for
the end of the month. CCAC officials
remain hopeful, however, a six-month
''provisional license" can be obtained
and have received tentative approval
from the license bureau in Lansing.
SINCE BEING notified of their evic-
tion, according to CCAC spokesman
Kenyon Brown, the day care center has
been "grabbing onto anyone or-
anything that looks hopeful."

Henry Johnson, University Vice-
President for Student Services, after
meeting with CCAC workers last week,
brought the center's case to the Univer-
sity officials yesterday at their weekly
executive meeting. Johnson and the
other five University vice-presidents,
along with Interim President Allan
Smith, ; concluded other University
priorities would take precedence over
the center.
"No one is against child care," John-
son said yesterday after the meeting.
"But against the scheme of things that
have to be put before it, it (CCAC) fell
very low on our list of priorities." John-
son said he and other University of-
ficials were well aware that the
decision may force CCAC's closing.
"WHEN IT CAME to either space
allocation or capital investment, we
didn't figure it (CCAC) would rise to a
high priority," explained Smith.
The officials rejected outright a list

of alternative sites for the day care cen-
ter offered by CCAC workers. One of
the suggested locations was in the
Union.
More than 35 children attend the cen-
ter daily, CCAC workers said. Univer-
sity students and volunteer workers
make up the majority of the center's
staff.
"IT'S REALLY disappointing,"
Margaret Elias, CCAC co-director said.
"There's really nothing else to say."
In the past, local fire inspections have
found the CCAC safe, but a recent state
inspection objected to its. third floor
location as a fire hazard. Inspectors
also said the 32 large-sized hallway
doors leading to a safe exit would make
an emergency escape difficult for pre-
schoolers.
CCAC workers said finding a new
location for the day care center will be
a difficult task without University help.
They also said it was "unfair" that the

University provides space and funding
for student programs, but will not give
the center a new rent-free location.
"WE ARE OCCUPYING a space we
need," Smiley said. "Day care enters
all around town are -full. Both the
University facilities (CCAC and Pound
House) have long waiting lists." Smiley
said there is need for the center, as 'U'
students and faculty can "pursue their
career goals while maintaining contact
with their children."
CCAC workers are currently looking
for off-campus locations to, house the
day care center, but would rather have
a new University location.
"If we want to maintain that we are a
University day care center, we should
stay on campus," Smiley said. "It's
very important that we stay on cam-
pus."
"We're going to stop and take another
look at the whole thing," Smiley added.
"We're not going to give up hope."

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 7, 1979-Page 5
Engineering & Computer Science Majors
DON'
GRADUATE
without talking to the
Hughes Recruiter visiting
your campus soon.
Contact your placement office
t for interview dates.
HUGHES
L---P-------------EP-E
Creting a new world with electronics
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F.

Tuition trouble for Western U's Iranians

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KALAMAZOO (UPI) - Iranian
students unable to get money from
home because of the political upheaval
in Iran have another six weeks to pay
their tuition and fees or face expulsion
from school and possible revocation of
their visas.
Western Michigan University of-
ficials announced yesterday 60 of the

215 Iranians enrolled at the school for
the winter semester were granted the
extension after they filed individual ap-
peals with the student payment com-
mittee.
WINTER CLASSES began Jan. 3 and
will end April 21 for WMU's 20,000
students. The Iranians and about a

dozen other students now have until
March 23 to pay their bills.
The payment deadline originally was
extended to Jan. 22, then to Feb. 5
before school officials began con-
sidering the students' problems on a
case-by-case basis.
The 215 Iranians at WMU are among
1,600 going to school in Michigan and

thousands more attending classes at
schools across the country.
Immigration officials have said
anyone admitted to this country on a
student visa is subject to removal from
the country if that student status is lost,
which could happen if the students fail
to meet tuition deadlines set by the in-
dividual schools.

WILL YOU STAND

Farmers demonstrate at White House'

(Continued from Page 1)
The White House parade was good-
tempered, with farmers and their
families riding in the scoop of a back-
hoe and on the cab roofs, playing
guitars and waving flags.
THE TRACTORS were plastered

with signs such as "Dump Carter,"
"Peace, Hope, Parity" and "Cows may
Come and Cows may Go, but USDA
(Agriculture Department) Bull goes on
Forever."
Police removed only one bus from

their barricade of the Mall area, bet-
ween the Washington Monument and
the Capitol, to let the tractors through.
Other buses, garbage and tow trucks
and police vans remained bumper-to-
,bumper at all exits to prevent a

Attorneys explain their use of
expanded funding for MSA

repetition of Monday's epic traffic
snarl.
SEVERAL DOZEN farmers listened
quietly as Bergland discussed
American farm exports before the
House Foreign Affairs Committee but
some booed him as he left the hearing
room.
Bergland told reporters he felt many
of the farmers faced real financial
problems but some were "driven by
greed."
On the Mall itself, restless farmers
raced other tractors up and down the
road, - overturning one. Another
knocked down a fire hydrant opposite
the Agriculture Department, releasing
a gushing torrent until firemen were
able to shut off a major water main.

)m
ON: THE MBE?
4 1 1979 MBE DATES:
February 28 July 25
The one book that can make
the difference between success
and failure on the MBE'
Barron's How to Prepare for the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)
by Victor E, Schwartz. Professor of Law. University of Cincinnati
(Author of ''Cases and Materials on Torts
Prepared by a noted law professor, Barron's How to Prepare for the
Multistate Bar Examination contains a 200-question simulated MBE
covering the six core subjects- constitutional I'aw, contrasts, criminal
law, evidence, real property, and torts. All answers are completely
analyzed, with citations provided for further reference. Even the
unacceptable answer choices are'thoroughly discussed.
The book also includes:
* valuable guidelines for answering Mn--t
MBE questions successfully ap s
M subject outlines and, bibliographies,~
" information on the nature and -
scoring of the MBE I
" a complete listing of individual P
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(Continued from Page 1)
is just now becoming known, and that
they handled 102 open cases last month.
They anticipate 1,200 to 1,500 coming
.through their-office during the year.
Open file cases do not include ad-
visory legal services. .
As examples of their work, Teich and
Rose discussed a do-it-yourself-divorce
system they have prepared, as well as a
do-it-yourself shoplifting court kit.
Students have also been able to try their
own cases against landlords, according
to Rose.
IN THAT CASE, Rose said legal ser-
vices advised the students who sued for
eviction by their landlord, and taught
then! how to go about presenting their
own case. The tenants won the case,
and in the end received more than they
had asked for.
"It's a good trend towards
demystifying the law, and teaching
people how to use the courts," Rose
said.
Rose and Teich have also been busy
with writing housing legislation for the
city. They worked-to pass a state truth
in renting law, which stipulated honesty
in leases, as well as writing fair renting
practices proposals. They have also
worked on several state housing laws.
ROSE, WHO has been an attorney
with the organization for five years,
said: "Legal Services is a way students
can determine their own fate. Students
are considered clients.
"It's a rare thing in this University.
We get along with the clients, and they
Lffohann c8tiauss
%X X.
-00
MIA '

like us," he explained to MSA mem-
bers.-
Rose and Teich thanked the assembly
for the funding support. Said Teich:
"We'd like to thank you (MSA) for
allowing us to be possible and wanting
us to do this as well as possible. This is
your service.
"It's funded through MSA, and you

(MSA) can say to anyone on campus tat
this is what MSA does. It's substan-
tial," Teich continued," and I hope you
think it's substantial."
MSA President Eric Arnson said he
though Student Legal Services is effec-
tive and added, "They (Student Legal
Services) deserve a real note of ap-
preciation."

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SPRINGER-VERLAG:

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ANNALS OF MATHEMATICS
LONDON MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY:
LECTURE NOTES

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