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February 07, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-07

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Page 2-Wednesday, February 7, 1979-The Michigan Daily
BECHTEL CORP.
Council OKs EDC

.

plan site

By JEFFREY WOLFF
City Council approved the site area
Monday night for the proposed $1.3
million expansion plan by the Bechtel
Corporation. The site approval is part
of a long process to be completed before
the company can expand with the aid of
the special bond issuing powers of the
Economic Development Corporation
(EDC).
-The EDC is a six-month-old

mechanism through which the city can
issue tax-exempt, low-interest bonds
for financing development and expan-
sion of private business enterprises in
Ann Arbor. But according to the EDC
spokesman Peter Long, the city "would
have no direct or indirect liability for
repayment," should .Council approve
the bonds.
COUNCILMAN David Fischer (R-
Fourth Ward) said Monday's vote

represents "only a step on the way,"
and clearly "not definite approval."
Council, also agreed to establish a
citizens' advisory committee for the
project.
The final decision on the project is
expected to be made by Council
sometime next month. Before that
time, Bechtel must prepare a project
report including such information as
the nature of the project's future

I.

/

SUMMER fCMP
STflFF W6NMTED
Representatives from

sN '"
l o Q t
3
i t.
3
A s

Sol

I

c-Imp -CI
will be interviewing for Summer Positions at
Student Summer Placement Office Monday, 2/12
and at Hillel Tuesday 2/13. For interview, time
please contact Mrs. A. Cooper at 763-4117 and
Hillel office at 663-3336.

operations, length and extent of con-
struction, and impact on the physical
and demographic composition of the af-
fected neighborhoods.
The buildings to which Bechtel would
like to expand are located on Boar-
dwalk Drive off Eisenhower, adjacent
to a building presently occupied by
Bechtel.
THE LOCAL Bechtel division, which
employs about 1,200 .workers, is in-
volved in design, construction, and
management of both nuclear and con-
ventional power plants. Detroit E'dison
and Consumers Power are two of its
major Midwest clients. The proposed
expansions, which would be mainly.
warehousing operations, are expected
to employ an additional 50 to 200
workers.
EDC itself initially approved the
project last month unanimously. City
Manager Sylvester Murray, who atten-
ded the EDC meetings dealing with
Bechtel, told Council that Bechtel
presented a "very complete" report
and led the Board to conclude that "this
is the type of business we thought we
would want to encourage."
Bechtel was represented by the San
Francisco-based Lakeside Corporation
which technically would be leasing the
buildings from EDC and then sub-
leasing them to Bechtel.
ALTHOUGH Monday's vote was far
from representing final approval,
strong anti-EDC sentiment was reflec-
ted in the Council's intense and often
antagonistic grilling of Lakeside and
EDC representatives. EDC has con-
sistently been a focal point of con-
troversy, often along partisan lines,
since the specific articles of incor-
poration were proposed by Ann A r:-
bor's Chamber of Commerce and ap-
proved in July by the Republican
majority in the City Council, under the
sponsorship of Mayor Louis Belcher.
Questioning was particularly critical
on the part of Democratic Council
members. Ken Latta expressed
dissatisfaction with the criteria, saying
he had previously thought "we were
going to have other criteria besides just
financial (considerations)."

7 '

Just relax and open ,wide
Ronald Alexander, vice-president of the University's Black Dental Student
Association (BDSA), checks the teeth of a wary Farshed Hesaaraki. The
checkup was part of a dental screening and information clinic recently con-
ducted by the BDSA. Under the supervision-of Dr. Marilyn Woolfglk, a group
of four-year-olds fron the Headstart program at Mack School were exmained
and then instructed on proper dental hygiene. (Photo by Cath Carver courtesty
of University Information Services.)
Police say Pontiac
-u .Kr

Ft Lauderdale

Spring

Breakoul I

.r

When

you fly with us,

the party begins'
in the sky ! _.
ROUND TRIP JET FARE ONLY $139.00'
Leave March 2 -Return March 10

I

For Reservation Information
Call Toll Free-1-800-848-9155
" FREE BEER ON OUR FLIGHT!
" Includes non-stop, round trip flight on
Boeing 737 * 'Low rates on ocean front
hotel rooms available * Reservations for
National Rental Cars available
* February 9 th deadline, call early-
space is limited
TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS BY
STUDENT SUNFLIGHTS, INC.
* Plus $10.40 Federal Transportation Tax

man shot t
PONTIAC (UPI) - Police said
yesterday they opened fire on a gun-
man holding 15 hostages in the lobby of
a General Motors truck plant to savek
the life of an officer who tried to talk
him into surrendering.
The gunman, Fred Wunnenberg, 28, a
night shift worker at the plant, was
killed Monday in a -volley .of police
bullets fired through double glass win-
dows.
Asked if Wunnenberg had fired at
police during the Monday night con-
frontation, Police Capt. Earl Skrobeck
said, "He didn't have a chance to."
TWO OF the hostages suffered minor
wounds earlier when Wunnenberg fired
his .22-caliber rifle into the floor.and the
bullet fragmented. Three of the other
hostages were unnamed plant security
guards.
Police said Wunnenberg, who had
skipped work Monday, telephoned the
GM Truck and Coach Division plant
and said he planned to kill his wife, Cin-
dy, who worked in the plant cafeteria.
He later stormed into the lobby-

THE--MICHIGAN DAIL Y
olumne LXXXIX, No. 117
Wednesday, February 7. 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through Aprilt2 semesters> 7$13: by mail.
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

o save cop
building of the facility, fired a shot into
the ceiling and told the 15 persons in the
room to sit on the floor. He later fired
another shot into the floor - and it was
that shot which caused the two injuries,
authorities said.
SKROBECK said police werenotified
of the situation by a security guard who
left the room to give one of the wounded
hostages first aid treatment for an arm
wound.
Officers arriving at the scene
surrounded the building and an unar-
med, uniformed policeman entered the
lobby with his arms raised in a move to
persuade Wunnenberg to surrender,
Skrobeck said.
He said Wunnenberg, who had been
sitting on a desk with his rifle pointed at
the hostages, "stood up suddenly, put
his left hand on the stock'of the rifle and
began raising the rifle while facing the
officer.
"The officers outside clearly obser-
ved this action take place and deter-
mined they would have to shoot to save
the officer's life, which they did,"
Skrobeck said.

. s __

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10

Daily Official Bulletin

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1179
Daily Calendar:
Psychiatry: ?Bernard J. Carroll, M.D.. Ph.D.,
"Diagnosis of Depression: New Clinical and
Laboratory Developments" CPI Aud., 9:30 a.m.
Ctr. Russian/E. European Studies: R. H. Hewsen,
"The Caucusus in the Russian-Soviet Context."
Commons, Lane, noon.
Ctr. AfroAmerican/African Studies: Michael
Olisa. "Africa: New Dimensions of Dependency."
346 Old A&D, noon.
Statistics: George Williams, "A Case History of
Data Corrdinating Center: The Noctural Oxygen
Therapy Trial,' 451 Mason Hall. 4 p.m.
Ind./Oper.Eng.: Katta Murty, "Survey of Some
Optimization Problems," 229W. Eng., 4p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: L. C. Davis, Ford Scientific
Lab., "Photoemission and Auger Spectra of Narrow
Band Metals: Theory." 2038 Randall, 4 p.m.
Chemical Engineering: 'Brice Carnahan, The Am-
dahl 470/V6 Computing System and MTS," Nat. Sci.
Aud., 7:30 p.m.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
:3200 SA B -763-4117
Announcements:
U.S. Dept. Labor, Washington. Summer Intern
Program for juniors/seniors and up. Required
majors, Ind. hygiene/environmental health.
chemistry, biology, economics. Further details
available.
Defense Logistics Agency, Cleveland, Ohio. Ac-
countant, Financial Analyst. Computer Specialist
and Ind. Engr. positions open in Cleveland, Grand
Rapids, Detroit. Further details available.
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 111. Summer Intern
Program in Minnesota for Engr Technician GS-5.
Further details available.
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Wash.
D.C. Opening for Management Analyst or Program
Analyst GS-5 or 7. Further details available.
U.S: Dept. Interior, Fish & Wildlife Div.. Wash.
D.C. Opening in field of Biological Science En-
vironmental Education). Further details available.
U.S. Dept. of Agri. Food & Nutrition Service.
Wash., D.C. GS-9. Statistician opening. Further
details available.
Office of Personnel Management, Wash., D.C. GS-
7 position Students in economics, public admin., or
law. Further details available. Also. fields of human
resource development or education technology.

MEN'S & WOMEN'S
FRYE BOOT SALE
15% OFF
Lirmited Time Only!
Good Selection of Sizes
and Styles.. .
FRYE BOOT ARE' STILL BENCH-
CRAFTED. This means that
many of the operations are
done by skilled hands, niuc
the same as they were over a
hundred years ago.

i

- - ."

'~u

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