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February 03, 1979 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-03

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, February 3, 1979-Page 3

1F J SEE NEVSHA EL":'L ) Y
New location
The Center for Afro-American and African studies has moved its
offices to the second floor of the old Architecture and Design Building,
next to CRISP. The Center had been located at 1100 S. University until
last Monday. The Center, which is a unit of the Literary College, offers
courses in a variety of areas, including Afro-American history and
politics, according to Anthropology Prof. Niara Sudarkasa, an instruc-
tor in the program.'
Response to refuse
Jonathan Dreyfuss' telephone hasn't stopped ringing since
Wednesday, when we ran an item describing Recyle Ann Arbor.
Recycle Ann Arbor is a non-profit organization which picks up
recyclable refuse from your curbside the first Saturday of every mon-
th-if you live in the Old West Side, an area bounded by Liberty,
Stadium, and Main streets. Apparently 'reyfuss has received calls
from interested people who live in all parts of Ann Arbor. Dreyfuss
said he wishes he could expand his pick-up operation, but currently he
is unable to do so. He urged interested parties-from the Old West
Side-to call him at 6656398.
Take Ten
On Feb. 3, 1969, nearly 1,000 students staged a three-hour sit-in
at the administration building at Michigan State University to protest
the firing of Bertram Garskof, an assistant professor psychology. One
student said that Garskof-whose courses were basically unstructured
and open to much student input-taught "us to think for ourselves."
Also on that day, S.I. Hayakawa, then Acting President of San Fran-
cisco State College, told Congress that militants were using Nazi-like
tactics in their protests. Hayakawa is now a Republican U.S. Senator
from California.
Happenings
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Festival-Animation Festival, 7, 10:20 p.m.,
Supershorts, 8:40 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Mediatrics-Silver Streak, 7, 9:00 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild-Seven Beauties, 7, 9:15 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Cinema II-Looney Tunes Review, Part 6, Program A, 7, 10:00
p.m., Program B, 8:30 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Markley Council-Shampoo, 8,10:30p.m., Markley Hall.
PERFORMANCES
PTP-"Side by Side by Sondheim," 8:00 p.m., Power Center.
UTP-Storey's "In Celebration," 8:00 p.m., Trueblood Theatre,
Frieze Building..
Musical Society-Russian Festival/Moscow Philharmoic, 8:30
p.m., Hill Aud.
French Experimental Theatre-"Tutuguri," 8:00 p.m., Canter-
bury Loft, 332S. State.
LECTURES
Wesley Foundation-"Third World Perspectives," 8:30 p.m.,
Wesley Foundation, 602 E. Huron at State St. ,
International Association for the Advancement of Appropriate
Technology for Developing Countries-Tom Weisskopf, "Economic
Aspects of Introducing Appropriate Technology for Developing Coun-
tries," 10:00 a.m., Rackham East Conf. Room.
MISCELLANEOUS
Pound House Children's Center-Etnic Fair and Film
Festival, 12:45-3:30 p.m., 1024 Hill St.
Canterbury Loft-workshop in mime, movement, and im-
provisational theatre, 10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 332 S. State.
UAC/UPC Mini-courses-sign-up at Ticket Central in the Union
for Belly Dancing, Sign Language, and Basic Investments mini-
courses next week.
Frugal administration
Democrat Attorney General Frank Kelly became acting governor
yesterday, for only the second time in 17 years, and immediately took
advantage of the situation. Kelley is fourth in the constitutional line of
succession and, yesterday Gov. William Milliken, Lt. Gov. James
Brickley, and Secretary of State Richard Austin were all out of the
state. "Kelley's action-packed, cost-cutting administration began at 8
p.m. yesterday without expensive inaugural pomp and circumstances,"
and will end at 2 p.m. today, again without expensive frivolities such
as a farewell address," said a tongue-in-cheek press release from his
office. Kelley's first term as acting governor of Michigan was in
January, 1969.
Motivation for morning
College students are notorious for sleeping through early morning
classes, but a wake-up service like the one offered at Texas Tech

University in Lubbock, Texas could help students get out of bed on
time. Gary and Jeff Burkman last month began advertising for par-
ticipants in Raider Call, a system which guarantees a call from a
member of the opposite sex at a specified time each morning, Monday
through Friday. Each subscriber wakes up to a voice of the opposite
sex, and each day during a one-month period that voice belongs to a
different person. Aided by a special business telephone, the phones of
a man and a woman ring simultaneously each morning. When they an-
swer, they can talk to each other for two-and-a-half minutes. The ser-
vice lasts without repeated voices for a month. At the end of the mon-
th, customers gather for a party. "If a person is shy," said Gary
Burkman, "it may take a few calls to get into the swing." The service
is scheduled to begin Monday.
Frampton sued by
'inspirational' Penny
Peter Frampton is being sued for half of everything he owns by a
woman who says she was his inspiration. Penelope McCall, who lived
with Frampton for five years, filed suit with the state Supreme Court
in Westchester County, N.Y., claiming she is entitled to the money
because she spent five years being his "live-in partner, aide, and in-
spiration." "This is nothing personal between Peter and me," ex-
plained McCall. "It's just a business thing. I came back from the
Bahamas last summer and he told me he wanted to live alone ... I had
no car and no finances." However Frampton, a multi-millionaire, is
seeking to have the suit dismissed on the grounds that New York State
law does not grant unmarried partners the right to claim each other's
possessions.
Groundhog Phil's prediction
Punxsutawney Phil, the nation's number one groundhog, pre-
dicted yesterday that winter will last another six dismal weeks. Phil
crawled out of his burrow on Gobbler's Knob in Punxstuawney, Pen-
nsylvania at 7:30 yesterday morning and spotted his shadow. Accor-

New environmental travel group
organizes trips to exotic places

By CRAIG FEIGEN
Jules Verne journeyed to the center
of the earth; Dante traveled to Heaven;
Carlos Castaneda visited Ixtlan.
Although these exotic destinations may
be difficult for others to reach, students
can journey to the towering Himalayas,
trace ancient trade routes to Tibet, or
backpack among active Andean
volcanos in Columbia.
Journeys, a new environmental-
oriented travel organization, plans six
4-5 week trips to Nepal, India, Sri
Lanka, and Columbia in the spring,
summer, and fall of 1979.
JOURNEYS WAS founded by Will
and Joan Weber, two doctoral can-
didates at the University's School of
Natural Resources, after they led ten
Ann Arbor residents on a trek to the Mt.
Everest area of Nepal in 1978. Journeys
attempts to provide "small group
travel experiences of mutual benefit to
the traveler and the culture visited,"
according to Weber. /
"We see this as an almost anti-
tourism kind of program," he added.
"We want to give people a personal,
authentic appreciation of what ittis like
to live in these areas. We prefer local
style accommodations and avoid lavish
facilities and activities which might be'
inappropriate to the host culture."
Weber, who is a former Nepal Peace
Corps volunteer, notes the problems
which careless tourism may cause in
fragile environments. Traditional
culture may wither, local food and
scarce fuel supplies may dwindle or
become prohibitively expensive, and
outright environmental damage may
occur, he noted.
IS ANTI-TOURISM the wave of the
future? The Webers think it may be.
"The best thing that could happen
would be for the tourist industry to steal

this idea," Will commented. "As it is
now, the foreign tourist pays a high
price to see areas that are unique
because the tourist's own cultural trap-
pings and technology have not
penetrated.
"Ironically, much of the money paid
for the privilege of experiencing such
iplaces supports the very influences that
threaten to strip away the uniqueness,"
Weber said.
AFTER THEIR Mt. Everest trip last
summer, the Webers spent time in
other areas of Nepal, India, and Sri
Lanka, making contacts and discussing
the concept of a traveler-supported
"Earth Preservation Fund (EPF)."
The Webers founded EPF, and ask
trip participants to contribute about
$100 to help support localconservation
efforts in the areas visited.
"The money that we are able to raise
may not seem like very much here in
the U.S., but in a developing country
that can accomplish a great deal when
used in local programs," said Bradley
Gross, another former Peace Corps
Volunteer and leader of the Columbian
expedition.
"WE FOUND mpany people, including
local school officials, Buddhist lamas,
government development experts, and
national environmental leaders who
share our optimism," Weber said.
Through EPF, Journeys will try to
distribute seeds, seedlings, conser-
vation equipment, and educational
materials at a community level as part
of the group exploration.
EPF will also support existing
programs of the Sri Lanka Wildlife and
Natural Protection Society, India's
Bhratpur Wildlife Trust, Nepal's
Nature Conservation Society, and
volunteer projects of the National
Development Service.

"WHEN THE trip is over, we expect
participants to feel as we have felt in
the past: that they have received gifts
of friendship and knowledge and will
want to give something in return,"
commented Ms. Weber.
"We do this through a sharing of
ideas and more tangibly through con-
tributions to EPF," she concluded.
"We know of no other conservation-
oriented travel program which visits
unique natural environments of the
world and at the same time, makes a
tangible and direct contribution to
protecting the areas visited," Weber
added.
Do a Tree a Favor:
Recycle Your Daily

MANN THEATRES
WVILLAGE
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
X69-1300
ADMISSION
Adut-$4.00 Child-$2.0
PG UndedArbists
SHOWTIMES
MON.-FRI.
6:30-9:00
SAT.& SUN.
1:45 6:30
3:45 '9:00
Tickets onSole 15 Minutes
Prior to Showtime
YOU'LL BELIEVE
A MAN CAN FL Y
SUPERMAN
MARLON BRANDO
r GENE HACKMAN
SHOWTIMES
MON.-FRI. SAT. &SUN.
7:00-9:45 1:30 7:00
Tickets on Sale 30 Minutes 4:15 9:45
Prior to Showtime

Lina Wertmuller's SEVEN BEAUTIES 17s
GIANCARIO GIANNINI romps through this usual (that is bizarre) Wert-
muller melange of politics and sex as a small-hood living down his reputa-
tion as the "monster of Naples." By sheer incompetence and a sense of
misplaced pride, he is wanted for murder, committed to an asylum and
ends up in a concentration camp fawninq over a beastly woman com-
mander. Internationally, it put Wertmuller (director of SWEPT AWAY) over
.the top as the woman director a teature (so tar). With SHIRLEY STOLER,
FERNANDO RAY and in forboding color.
SUN: THE LAST PICTURE SHOW

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 A9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

_ _ _ __

daily Official Bulletin

I C F PART,-r

TONITE ONLYI.
CINEMA 11
ANGELL HALL AUD. A
2 Completely
Different Programs
Program "A"-7& 10
Program "B" - 8:30 ONLY

Saturday. February 3, 19711
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB-763-4117
INTERVIEWS:
Fresh Air Fund, New York, Coed. Staffing for
four camps-get in on it. Will interview here Wed.
Feb. 7 from 9 to 5. Many openings including water-
front (WSI), arts/crafts, gen. counselors. Wide
range of opportunities-work with innercity
children, handicapped or standard camps. Register
by phone or in person.
The time has come-Cedar Point will be here-the
place to spend the summer and earn money too. Will
interview here Wed./Thurs. Feb. 14-15 from 9 to 5.
Register in person or by phone.
JCC Camps, Coed. Mi. Will interview Mon. Feb. 12
from 10:00 to 4:00. Openings include supervisory
positions (21, general counselors. Register in person
or by phone.
Camp Chi, Wisc. Coed. Will interview Mon. Feb. 12
from 9 to 5. All positions are open at this time. Also,
openings of interest to social workers, arts/crafts,

waterfront WS, athletics, sports, etc. Register by
phone or in person.
Announcement:
Gruman Aerospace Corp.. New York. Ten Masters
Fellowship in a work
study program for the summer. Fields of
study-areospace technologies. Further details
availble. Deadline March 1.
TILE : MICIIGIN DIIAL,
Volume 1.XXXIX. No. 101
Saturday. February 3, 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April 12 semesters): $13 by mail.
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: $7,401by mail outside Ann Arbor.

ADULTS $1.50
DOUBLE $2.50

KIDS $.75
DOUBLE $1.25

Looney Tunes Review returns with its 4th collection of classic Warner Brothers
cartoons. As always, no cartoon from a previous Review is repeated. Our
selections this term are from a 25-vear soon (1937-1962), and include such
classics as Duck Amock, Bully for Bugs. Little Orphan Airedale, the 1947
Oscar-winning Scentimental Over You, Super Rabbit, a rare WW 11 Bugs
Bunny propaganda film, and 14 others. Directors featured will be Chuck Jones
(Hollywood's greatest cartoon director), Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson, and
for historical perspective, a few ealy Tex Avery entries will be on hand. When
Warner's was good they made the Hollywood cartoon at its best: fast, unpren-
tentious, witty, and grown up. Disney tried to make us cry-Warner's made us
roll in the aisles. Starring Bugs, Daffy, Porky, Pepe, Elmer, Yosemite, Tweetie,
Foghorn, Roadrunner, Inki, etc.
Sun: WORD IS OUT

.i

I

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT"
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FOR PRICE OF ONE,

A L.S FRI.,SAT,, SUN.
EVE. UHOLIDAYS $3.59
MON.-THIURS. [Vt. 30

__ :1

CAMPUS

,

STARTING FRI., FEB. 9th
"LORD OF TH E RINGS"

"LORD OF THE RINGS" I

I

I

I

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I

MON., TUES., WED., THURS.7 &9
FRI.7 & 9:25-SAT. 1-3-5-7-9:25
S WSUN. 1-35-7-9
NO WEDNESDAY MATINEE

1RUTH GRO
BUD CORT [GP]

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