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January 30, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTER
MEDICAL
SCHOOL in August
Qrio'ttion by Matriculated Student
W. H. 0. Recognized
Pey on acceptance only
For application 8 information write:
P*OVEN MEDICAL STUDENT
PLACEMENT SERVICE:.
100 LaSalle St.
New York, N.Y. 10027
or CALL:
(212) $65-4949

Page 12-Tuesday, January 30, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Amended bias suit

Alb A1 7

a

filed again
(Continued from Page5)
tunity Act states, according to Weaver,
that "if there is a language barrier that
interferes in the classroom, the school
has to aid the students in overcoming
the barrier."
Whether "black English poses a
language barrier or not is open to
question. According to Dr. Odell Nails,
Superintendent of Pontiac Schools, a
child who speaks black English is no
different than any other bilingual child.
"There are many children criticized for

ist

school

earn %'1OO
a month
for 2 or 3 hours a week of your spare time.
donate plasma
You may save a life!
It's easy and relaxing. Be a twice-a-week regular.
$10 cash each donation, plus bonuses.
this ad worth $5 extra
New donors only. Phone for appointment.
ANN ARBOR PLASMA CORPORATION
662-7744

speaking ghetto-lingo. We don't tell
Spanish kids it's bad to speak Spanish,
but you try to teach him English.
"If you criticize the language, a child
comes to school with, you make him
feel inferior and make him feel that his
home is inferior," Nails said. One way
to correct the situation is for teachers to
pay more attention to what is being said
rather than language usage.
THE NATURE of the language
barrier is another point open to con-
sideration. According to English
Professor Richard Bailey, a child who,
for instance, has trouble giving a long
monologue, may actually be quite
bright, but may not realize what is ex-
pected of him.
Many of the children in the suit come
from large families and so may not
have as much speaking experience with
adults as children from smaller
families. "They may not have normal
language skills because they haven't
had as much speaking experience with
an adult. The nature of a monologue
task may not be clear to children. It
doesn't mean they're dumber but that
they have less experience," said
Bailev.
According to linguistic Professor
Alton Becker, "The kinds of language
exchanges that are within a poor black
family are not going to be identical with
the kind of language exchanges in an
upper middle class white family. Each
is going to be uncomfortable in the
other's linguistic world."

Doily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
Senior Bob Feldman loses patience: "Where the hell is she?" Look behind you, Bob!
Sewage floods Village Green

I - I

1 !+
t i
I
i,.

II

ENGIEERSCH EMICA L, ELECTRICAL,
MECHANICAL ETIC
EGNESSun Petroleum Products
Company Seeks:
ENGINEERS INTERESTED IN THE FUTURE OF
THIS NATION'S ECONOMY!
ENGINEERS CONCERNED ABOUT THE WORLD'S
DWINDLING SUPPLY OF FOSSIL FUELS!
ENGINEERS EXCITED BY TECHNICALLY
CHALLENGING, PROFESSIONALLY
SATISFYING PROJECTS!
ENGINEERS SEEKING SUCCESS
AND EXCELLENT REMUNERATION
IN THE VITAL AND EXCITING
FIELD OF PETROLEUM_
REFINING/PRODUCTION!
Enninna rn m r Pr facional

(Continued from Page 1)
the Department of Health to have it
analyzed tomorrow.
Smith said, "the management told
me that it was my duty to get rid of the
water and that the sewers back up
because women flush tampons and
disposable diapers down the toilet."
Smith said he told the management that
When you bring paprika home
from the market it's a lovely scarlet,
color; to retain the color, store in the
refrigerator.

he used neither tampons nor disposable
diapers.
Bankhead says help didn't arrive at
the apartments until an hour and a half
after he called them for the first time.
"I called three times before help came
and I was told by Pat Price, the
resident manager, that the place would
be cleaned."
THE RESIDENT manager could not
be reached for comment after several
attempts late last night.
BANKHEAD AND his wife have left
their apartment and have taken a room
at the Union because of what they

called unsanitary conditions. "The
water just kept rising, it was filthy and
foul smelling and sewage was actually
coming up in the laundry room but the
management said it was livable and
they wouldn't pay for us to sleep
somewhere else," Bankhead said.
Sunday morning the same thing hap-
pened again, the drains started
gurgling and more sewer water started
pouring in. "We pay $265 a month for
greed, callousnes and disrespect,"'said
Smith.
The carpets have been taken off the
floor at the Village Green Apartments,
but the smell and the filth lingers on.

Kids museum puts hands on A2

,

staff will be on your campus
Wednesday February 7
to discuss our company's plans
for your career in The Petroleum
Industry. For further information,
please contact your College
Placement Office.

14

..

BY AMY DIAMOND
"I hear and I forget. I see and I
remember. I do and I understand."
This Chinese proverb is the general
philsophy behnd the "Hands On"
children's museums which are disper-
sed all around the United States.
The "Hands On" museums are ex-
perience-oriented. They operate on the
premise of learning through active par-
ticipation or a hands on-get involved
approach, rather than a hands off, just
look approach.
"ANN ARBOR could use something
like this because there's no place that
kids can identify with as their own,
most places are geared for adults,"
says Cynthia Yao, president of the
"Hands On" museum organization in
Ann Arbor.
Yao and the other twenty members of
the organization, who meet on a weekly
basis, have had an uphill climb trying
to get the museum started, but with suf-
ficient community support and a little
bit of luck, their dream for the Ann Ar-
bor children's museum could soon
become a reality.
It all began last October when the
City Council as accepting proposals for
what to do with the old firehouse which
was built in 1883 and has become a
famous landmark and symbol of Ann
Arbor. It was then that Yao decided to
write a letter proposing that the city let
the firehouse be used for the "Hands
On" museum.
"I PUT together a budget and im-
plementation plan,,gathering ideas and

figures from other "Hands On"
museums," says Yao.
The firehouse was to be used by
either the "Hands on" organization or
the Civic Theatre. The City Council
decided that the two groups would
share the building. However, the Civic
Theatre Workshop pulled out because
"there would have been inadequate
physical space," says Larry Hill, board
member of the Civic Theatre.
Just three weeks ago; on January 8,
the City Council gave the "Hands On"
organization an opportunity to go ahead
with their plans. The Council gave them
120 days to show they have community
support and some money in the bank.
A substantial amount of money will
be needed to start the museum. Yao
estimates they will need $350,000 to
renovate the firehouse and $85,000 for
costs which include: salaries, building
materials, and costs for borrowing and
building exhibits.
THE ORGANIZATION has been sent
many letters of support, including a let-
ter from the mayor and one from the
Historic District Commission, Yao
says, "We're planning a campaign to
go out into the Ann Arbor community to
ask for money and equipment."
Once the museum is established, the
organization hopes to keep it going by
attaining revenue from federal and
state agencies, memberships, the NEH
and NEA, and the museum gift shop.
The organization has already started
getting the kids involved by letting
them participate in a button campaign.
"We're selling buttons which advertise
the museum and the children in the
school system are helping make them,"
says Yao.
YAO"HOPES the museum can in
some way be tied in with the school
curriculum. "The museum will be a
community-involved educational and
cultural center whereby Ann Arbor's
rich resources of people and institutions
are utilized in the most creative man-
ner to benefit everyone," she said.
"The museum will be used to com-
plement the classroom curriculum by

providing exposure to objects and ex-
periences that can't be obtained in the
classroom."
The "Hands On" organization has
already started a resource file which
includes the names of who can do what
in the community, and who has special
interests and talents. "I thought it
would be appropriate if our first
exhibition is on the history of the fire
house. Perhaps we can obtain some old
fire equipment and have the kids learn
about the architecture and history of
the building," says Yao.
YAO, A 13-year resident of Ann Ar-
bor, has four children of her own. She is
a museum buff who will receive her
masters degree in museum practice
this April.
"It's wonderful seeing kids enjoying
themselves and learning at the same
time," says Yao, who has visited the
Boston children's museum several
times.
The United Nations has designated
1979 as the International Year of the
Child. Yao says, "Communities
everywhere are encouraged to do
something for their children, so it's a
most appropriate project for Ann Ar-
bor's community.

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SPRING BREAK
March 3-10, 1979
Sunlight Holidays@
R 'at""reua'aion""r a'at"""" r"ne

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Prices based on double occupancy
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