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January 27, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-27

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tuJ SE NkSPHAECAL Z AIy
Campbell's Soup talks back
In yesterday's paper we ran a story on the Farm Labor Organizing
Committee (FLOC) and their boycott of Libby's and Campbell's food
products. The picketed farmworkers claim they are being exploited
because the companies are refusing to negotiate with them over wages
and working conditions. At the time of the story, neither company
could be reached for comment. Yesterday, however, Scott Romback,
a Campbell's spokesperson, issued the following statement "to correct
erroneous information being disseminated." Campbell Soup, he said,
"does not grow its own vegetables, but contracts with growers for the
acreage and tonnage of vegetables refined for our products, and we
believe our contract prices are fair and competitive. We hope that in
their (FLOC) concern for fairness, ELOC will realize that any boycott
of our products affects our growers, employees, customers, other sup-
pliers, and ultimately the consumers." Rombach added that the FLOC
does not represent Campbell employees and the company's relation-
ship with unions and growers "has always been harmonious."
*Correction
In an article on test anxiety reduction which appeared in yester-
day's paper, Richard Shapiro was incorrectly identified as a Univer-
sity grad student. Actually he is a former University undergraduate.
Help needs help
Ann Arbor's Drug Help needs your assistance. Drug Help is looking
for volunteers to help others with drug related problems. The non-
profit organization is now accepting interviews until next Friday. In-
tereisted persons can call 994-HE LP for additional information.
+
Wild Irish rise
Faith and Begorra! Now is the time to get prepared for the gran-
daddy of them all, the Wild and wooly St. Patrick's Day celebration.
Some local residents, dismayed by the lack of any official observance
of this great Irish holiday, have proposed to organize the first Annual
St. Patrick's Day Parade, complete with a Grand Marshal, marching
bands and floats. "Many cities have paades and parties in observan-
ce of St. Patty, an d it's high time that Ann Arbor jumped on the Paddy
wagon," said Shaun McDoogle, originator of the proposal. Those in-
terested in helping out in the organization can contact Brian Martin at
668-8031.
Take ten
The Michigan Senate, on Jan. 27 1969, created a special committee
to investigate student activities and disorders at state universities.
The resolution, passed by voice vote, asked the committee to in-
vestigate "the possibility of criminal conspiracy on univerity cam-
puses, the strengthening of state criminal laws relating to breaches
of the peace on campus, and the role of SDS as related to campus
disorders." Sen. George Kuhn (R-Birmingham) said the resolution
"involves the survival of the free enterprise system."
I.,.
Happenings
FILMS
Mediat'rics - And Now For Something Completely Different, 7, 8:40,
10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Bananas, 7, 8:40, 10:20 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - La Grande Bourgeoisie, 7, 9 p.m., MLB
Aud. 4.
Cinema Guild - Billy Jack, 7, 9:15p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Cinema II- The Man Who Would Be iing, 7, 9:30 p.m., Angell Aud
A.
Couzens Film Co-op - Murder By Death, 8, 10:15 p.m., Couzens
Cafeteria.r
PERFORMANCES
Musical Society - Paul Taylor Dance Company, 8:00 p.m., Power
Center.
LECTURES
East Quad - "Blackiacking the Power Structure through Com-
munity Organization", Tom Fox, workshop 10:30-3:30 p.m.a
SPORTS
Tau Beta P1 - All-Engineering Basketball Playoffs, 10:00 a.mi.,
Sports Colliseum.
Men's Indoor Track - Michigan Relays: preliminaries 3 p.m.;
finals 6p.m., Track/Tennis Bldg.o

MISCELLANEOUS
MHTP - Art Print Sale Benefit, 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m., Union Lobby,
Fishbowl..
Winter Art Fair - Professional and Student Exhibitors, entertain-
ment, refreshments, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., 2nd floor, West Quad.
Rhyme Space- Poetry reading, C. Gregory, D. Victoe, 2:00 p.m.;
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union.
Asian American Night - Pendleton Center, 6:00 p.m., Michigan
Union.
A fistful of dollars
Former President Richard Nixon, described four years ago as
bankrupt and on the verge of skid row, is once again a happy
millionaire thanks to all of his book royalties and broadcast inter-
views. Nixon, who celebrated his 66th birthday two weeks ago, has
received more than $1 million from selling his memoirs and more than
$500,000 from the David Frost interviews, the Los Angeles Times
reported yesterday. Nixon gets approximately $78,000 a year in gover-
nment pension. His non-taxable expenses paid from the U.S. Treasury
under the Former Presidents' Act amounted to an additional $163,329
last year, not counting free postage. The cost of Secret Service protec-
tion for Nixon is $662,000 a year. Since Nixon's resignation on Aug. 9,
1974, the federal government has spent a total of $625,642 on the former
president's personal service, travel, and office expenses, not including
his pensions or Secret Service protection, the L.A. Times reported.
CR ISP's clone
If you think the drop-add lines at CRISP were bad this week, you
should have been at the University of North Carolina, where thieves
stole- the drop-add cards for eight deparments last weekend.
Registration officials were alerted to the theft and issued temporary
cards to be used in place of the stolen cards. As a result, though, the
students were faced with long lines and delays. "You've got to realize
we're dealing with 20,000 students, 4,000 sections, and 100,000 cards,"
said Ray Strong, director of records and registration. "It's unfor-
tunate this had to happen," Strong said. "We feel drop-add is impor-

The Michigan Daily-Saturday; January 27, 1979-Page 3
SUICIDE T HREA TS, FAMIL Y BRE AK UPS R EPOR TED:
'Holocaust'rattles W.German

BONN, West Germany (UPI) - The
TV station showing "Holocaust" the
American dramatization of the Nazi
massacre of Jews said yesterday
numerous former SS men were repor-
ting family breakups or even
threatening suicide because of the
series.
One former Nazi SS man said yester-
day that his wife of 25 years and their
four children left him after watching
the American-made TV series.
"SHE SAID she is going to have a
fence built around our house, have
swastikas painted on it and the words 'a
Nazi murderer lives here,' "the former
SS man told the Cologne radio-TV
station, WDR, managing the series.
"There is nothing left for me but to
shoot myself. We were going to

celebrate our silver wedding anniver-
sary next week."
A WDR spokesman said the 26 per-
sons taking up to 6,000 phone calls daily

"So many callers say they had no
idea these crimes had been committed
and want to know more," the
spokesman said. "Children are asking

"There is nothing left for me to do but shoot myself."
-former Nazi SS man

A few denounced the whole thing as
myth.
But several former SS men and a
number of former army soldiers sent
WDR letters containing .pfiotographs
they said had been taken of mass
executions or Jews being marched to
trains, concentration camps or
execution sites. They offered them as
proof that the Holocaust actually hap-
pened, a spokesman for the station
said.
An allowance race in horseracing is
one in which the weights to be carried
are determined by the amount of
money or number of races each has
.won..

about the "Holocaust" series reported
a number of similar calls, from
families split by arguments about the
series.
ABOUT TWO-THIRDS of the calls
came from persons approving the
series or asking for more information.

their fathers why they never talked
about it before."
The station said about one-third of the
callers expressed negative reactions
either objecting to reopening old woun-
ds or blackening Germany's
reputation.

Vodka may help less

"

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
With wire reports
The old belief in liquor as a medicinal
tonic is spilling over into the
psychiatric battle against phobias.
Dr. George Curtis, who heads the
University phobia clinic is conducting a
study to determine whether vodka
could be an important tool in helping
patients overcome the terrors of
anything from spiders to a simple trip

to the corner drugstore.
Curtis termed vodka "the most
widely self-prescribed anti-anxiety
drug," and said that fact justifies fur-
ther research into its uses. Curtis' goal
is to help patients gradually' overcome
their particular fears through the.
process of "desensitization."
During desensitization, psychiatrists
gradually expose patients to higher
levels of whatever causes the anxiety.

Women in careers:
choosing the system'

MAPLE 7tLAE SONGCENTER
ADMISSION
Someone afraid of heights, for exam- Adut-$4.00 Child-$2.00
ple, stands on the first step of a ladder
until anxiety eases, then moves to
higher steps until the fear is gone.
"We're already - pretty sure that .. TIS
vodka reduces anxiety in the im- '' , Mor
mediate situation," the psychiatry
professor said. But Curtis expressed so, sun.
concern thatvodka might not'be helpful 1:45
3;45.'
in the long run. He said the vodka "may ..6:3
well interfere" with gradual desen-. :T'
sitization.onsale
Curtis said that if vodka does not in- . prier to
terfere with the desensitization .*ShOW
process, "then it will be not only Ln UfltedArpists
popular but also clinically useful."
' Specialists at the clinic already use a SUPERMAN"SHOW
wide variety of drugs, including TIMs
marijuana, barbiturates, alcohol, anti- Mn.Fri
psychotic drugs, and tranquilizers } to 700
help patients cope with the sometimes
agonizing desensitizing period. sox., sun.
Doctors will continue their search for
an ideal method of treatment, which S : 7:oo
Curtis said would include a "drug 9:45
which reduced immediate anxiety and Tickets
enhanced the desensitizing effect." The on s°le
15 min.
result, he added, could be faster, more Prior to
effective treatment for the thousands of s_ showt;me.
persons who suffer from phobias.
IT S COING! t
A SUPER SPECTACULAR EVENT
Sat., Feb. 10-8 pm-The Union
To find out more call UAC: 763-1107

By MARION HALBERG
Women are exploring the job market
more than ever, but they will have to
work with the "system" to secure
positions, said University Women's
Program Coordinator Marueen
O'Rourke yesterday. O'Rourke spoke to
15 people gathered at a Guild House
luncheon, entitled "Women and Career
Choices - Issues for the 1980's."
Many of today's career women are
"playing the game," according to
O'Rourke. "They are playing the job
the way a man plays it. You have to un-
derstand the game, and that's a real
painful thing for women to have to
learn."
SEVERAL OF those present said
they wished women did not have to
become involved in a system they view
as corrupt. "Why would anyone make a
sex distinction?" demanded one par-
ticipant, referring to employment prac-
tices. "I would support a good person if
they were a good person."
O'Rourke replied that "you have to
understand the system before you can
change it. We have to think of ourselves
as pioneers."
The 33-year-old O'Rourke told the
crowd she has made the decision to
work within the system as Women's
Program Coordinator. Speaking to the
several University seniors who atten-
ded the luncheon for career advice
O'Rourke explained, "Women need to
find a mentor. There are women who
will help, and the more women in
careers the better it will be.
BY helping these women, I am
helping women in the future. I hope that
men anid women will re-evaluate suc-
cess, but I don't think the male model
will go away. I hope with more women
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No.98
Saturday, January 27, 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7,00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

in jobs there will be less of the com-
.petitiveness, the tightness, and the har-
dness."
O'Roprke presented a picture of
positive steps for women in the next
decade. "Women today have inore of a
vision of where they want to go, and of
what their options are," O'Rourke poin-
ted out. "They have more of an under-
standing of putting skills together and
have more of a possibility of exploring
the job market."
Predicting the trends of the future,
O'Rourke remarked, "Women students
in college now acknowledge they want
for both a career and a family. I think
in the 1980's there is going to be concern
for family .and career. Women are ex-
ploring what is available for them."

I

Do a Tree
a Favor:
Recycle
Your Daily

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS ADULTS FR., SAT. sU.
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT" EYE. a HOiDATS 53. O
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED ALLTNUR$ EY .5:
FOR PRICE OF ONE CMILD TO14 E50

i
,

I'

WAYSIDE THEATRE 'Wilderness Fwmiy
3020 Washtenaw P 2"
Phone 434-1782

What's Important
is where you
do your
bowling!
UNION LANE s
open 1 p. m. today

I

I

Tom McLaughlin's

1971

I

BILLY JACK
The film that did for karate and Indians what Disney did for Beethoven's
"Pastoral Symphony." Young Indian half-breed and an idealistic teacher
struggle to keep open a Freedom school against the opposition of an entire
town. Go to hear Linda Ronstadt. "One of the most electrifying, kinetic,
shocking films made in the name of justice."-Film Bulletin
Sun: HERE COME THE NELSONS

L

CINEMA GUILD.

TONIGHT AT
7:00.a9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

r

a

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
presents at MLB3 & MLB 4
Saturday, January 27
LA GRANDE BOURGEOISE
(Mauro Bolognini, 1978) ab9-MLB 4
A political scorcher from the Italian master of the period piece. Giancarlo
Giannini goes to murderous lengths to free his beloved sister (CATHERINE.
DENEUVE) from a repressive marriage. In the stunning opulence of their .

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