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January 23, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-23

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MASS MEETING
For Major Events new ushers
Conference Room No. 4
Michigan Union-5:30 pm
Student please bring 1. D.
Old ushers need not attend
BEST OF BROA DWAY
presents
HER IONEGINGOLD
in
<
. azzling '4usica1 ntertainment
Music and Lyrics by
STEPH EN SON DHEI M
and music by
Leonard Bernstein Mary Rodgers
Richard Rodgers Jule Styne
FEB. 2 ~4 POWER CENTER
Fri.-Sun. 8pm with 2pm Sun. Matinee
tickets are available at:
the Michigan League, 764-0450
hours: 10-1 and 2-5 weekdays
and all Hudson Ticket Outlets

Page 6-Tuesday, January 23, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Rising from the

Dead in Detroit

By DONALD COHEN
and PAULINE TOOLE
For years now, Greateful Dead fans
have thrived on the mania of their cult:
following the band with an avidity that
removes them from, the realm of the
ordinary afficionado. Sunday night
carloads of believers, many of them
from Ann Arbor, trucked to Detroit's
Masonic Auditorium for a renewal of
their faith. And the "Dead" laid out
their own religion on the assemblage -
rock - there was good, vital, clean and
clear.
The expectant crowd waited patiently
for over an hour while the crew com-
pleted setting up the equipment which
had been delayed at the airport. But
finally, the lights dimmed, the crowd
applauded heartily and rhythm
guitarist Bob Weir apologized for the
delay, with a promise to play late.
The receptive crowd seemed willing
to appreciate anything the group
played but also seemed hopeful that
this concert would be better than
mediocre. They were unwilling to hear
just another "Dead" concert - one
more in a string that stretches back and
forth across the country and with this
tour extends to Egypt.
WITH THE first few songs,
"Sugaree," "Me and my Uncle," and
"Big River," it seemed destined to be
just that. They were mechanical and by
rote warming-up song.
And then, midway through the first
set, with "Brown Eyed Women"
everything came together. The song
CAMP COUNSELORS
WANTED
Camp Towering Pines for Boys
Camp Woodland for Girls
In Beautiful Wisconsin
* Photography
" Rifling
" Riding
" Waterfront (WSI)
" Cook
Interview On Campus
Thursday, Jan.25
Summer Placement
3200 SAB
Phone: 763r p17
Register by phone or in person

seemed to turn the tables. The energy
was still a bit lacking, but it was on its
way up - the six musicians or stage
were becoming the Grateful Dead! The
crowd got moving and once again, the
hopeful were believers.
Weir's beautiful "Looks Like Rain,"
brought the band even closer togther.
The absence of vocalist Donm Jean
Godcheaux was notable, even though
she never seemed to add anythirg to the
band with her squealing shriek. She
never seemed appropriate to the
Grateful Dead. But, since joiring the
group in 1972, she has worked hr way
into the Grateful Dead of the late1970's.
KEITH GODCHEAUX, on the other
hand, is not, and never was, ment for
the Dead. His piano playing, although it
has improved since he joined the band
in late 1971 is just not up to par. He
doesn't bang at the keyboard quite as
monotonously as in the past, bu his
solos - which are more frequent o1 late
- are weak and detract from the
energy of the band.
Jerry Garcia loosened up, shoving
himself to be a consummate musian.
He is truly the master of his gutar,
exhibiting clean, fast, and comlex
guitar work.
GARCIA'S VOICE, noticebly
weaker after a recent illness wiich
caused the premature end of a late1978
tour, cracked on high notes. - Dring
some of his harmonies with Wei he
sang off key, changing the harmonis to
keep from hitting the high notes.
Keith Godcheaux, whose voie is
reminiscent of a female bullfrog in
heat, did some harmonizing to try to
make up for Garcia's ailing vocal hor-
ds and the absence of Donna Jean.
Several more songs in the firs; set
also showed the energy rising. A slow
version of "Friend of the Devil" was
brought off beautifully - another in-
dication of the Dead coming together.
The set closed with a powerful "Jack
Straw," setting the precedent for a
tight second set.
.The sour note in the entire concert,
forgetting about Keith Godchgaux's
organ playing, and forgiving tie late
beginning, then sounded. The seurity
force had evidently not been infoimed
that it was policing a rock concer, and
not a court of law. Every time en-
thusiasts stood to clap or dance, the or-
der came down: "Sit Down."
IT WAS the closest thing to leresy.
Imagine sitting stock still, rootd in a
seat for music that just pulls you to
move your feet and clap your hads.
The second set started wth the
rocking, high energy "Samsm and
Delilah," quickly- followed ;v an
equally exciting version of "Deal.'
And then it was time fot the dlead to
get into some serious playing hd do
what they are best at. So they janmed.
Things began with an exended
"Terrapin Station." From thai they
went directly into "Playing n the
Band," a rocking song and an exellent
jam.
After playing for a while, t non-
percussive members of the bandlowly
faded away, leaving the two drun ners,
Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzn n to
collaborate on a 15-minute perctssion
duet. Both drummers were in top farm.
Hart played his newly-acquired to, an
Egyptian hand drum called a tar.
HART HAS long been interested in
innovative percussion and since the
Grateful Dead's recent journy to
Egypt, the Middle-Eastern influences
have become more apparent in hi per-
cussive style.
'Garcia emerged from the wngs,
skillfully wringing percussive sunds

from his guitar. The rest of the band
slowly re-appeared, following the mood
the drummers had set; and then they
all went into "Truckin."
With the first notes of the song, the
crowd stood up en masse and demon-
strated their opinion of the number thy"
only way possible: by simply clapping.
and boogeying together.
Yes, this was the Grateful Dead, and
that. song captured its essence better
than almost anything else. If one could.
pick a signatory song for both the band
and the fans that trail in their wake, it
would be that number, for it expresses
the state of the Dead and their following
today:
"Sometimes the lights all shinin' on me
other times I can barely see
. lately it occurs tome
What a long strange trip its been ..."
FROM THERE, they faded into the
slower, almost dirge-like "Stella Blue"
and ended the set with the old Rascals

song, "Good Lovin," now rearrange
and sung by Weir.
. The second set, as a whole was nea
perfection and featured excellen
playing. Weir showed himself to be on
of the best rhythm guitarists around
with complex rhythms and occasional
double leads.
The Grateful Dead of 1979 is not
significantly different from the
Grateful Dead of the recent past. What
is different is the nature of the perfor-
mance.
What we are seeing more and more is
a group of excellent musicians that play
together and sound great. We see less
and less of the Grateful Dead as an en-
tity independent of the musicians them-
selves.
Technically, the band is far superior
now, but the energy of the group as a
unit was far greater in those days.Stil.
they can surely be called one of the best
rock and roll bands around today.

Russell aims barbs
at American society
(Continued from Page 1)

glasses, resembling many. of the
politicians he mocks, the comedian-
columnist stalked across the stage as
he treated his audience to a glimpse of
the absurdity of government dictates.
"We don't speak English in
Washington," he apologized. "We have
our own bureaucratic language called
'federalese'."
Russel made some political con-
tributions of his own, however, such as
recommending tax breaks on vasec-
tomies, and reporting to his listeners
that "Thirty-seven senators who voted
against the Panama Canal Treaty have
formed their own nation." The nation
called "Reagania" features a leader
who is "a mad Don Quixote with orange
hair."
HE ALSO explained his endorsement
of Nelson Rockefeller, saying
"Anybody who owns something should
be able to run it."
Russel observed how much power
modern corporations have, especially
in this area. He then renamed the
"Hindenburg."
A few times Russel communicated

individually with his audience, such as
his exchange with a group of law
students. He went on to explain the
process of legal education in which he
likens law school to army boot camp..
He quoted the instructor telling his
students that some will go on the great
things while others will crack. "The
ones who crack," he exclaimed "will be
lawyers!
FOR MOST OF the performance
Russel displayed a thunderous oratory
that many politicians might envy.
While explaining the ignorance of the
middle aged, he stated that "There are
some of us who believe that "Sha Na Na
just left Iran.'
The first speaker in this year's
viewpoint lectures, Russel lampooned
government officials, saying that Vice-
President Mondale "is as convincing as
a conservative as Truman Capote is
singing "Stout-hearted men'."
He also got his digs in at foreign
policy as he revealed his recipe for
"Taiwan Duck." "Get a duck," he in-
structed, '"promise you'll take care of
it, and chop-its head off."

.,

U of M Office of Major Events presents:
,
February 20, 1979'
Power Center-8:00 pm
Reserved Seats-$6.00
Tickets go on sale Wednesday, January 24, at 10 am at the Michigan Union Box
Office (763-2071). To order by mail, send money order, only, and self addressed
stamped envelope to:
Second City-/-Michigan Union Box Office
530S. State, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
THE ORIGINAL
:.::; :MOTION PICTURE
SOUNDTRACK
RECORDING
PRODUCED BY LEONARD ROSENMAN
AND SAUL ZAENTZ
{ ' Composed and Conducted by
S .JLEONARD ROSENMAN

r

-"9

The closer you get

s ".

...the better we look.
764-0558

TWO-RECORD SET LOR-1
AVAILABLE ON FANTASY RECORDS AND TAPES
A FANTASY FILMS
PRESENTATION
Released thru
United Artists

(IVFISITY 5 MUSICAL 8OCIETY presents'

$8.9
E Aw e u IUbu w A± T

Paul Taylor's innovative troupe is one of

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