100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 23, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COUPON COUPON
~2for 1 Specia l
p I
' Buy 1 Super Salad-Get 1 FREE ;
Fresh greens, tomatoes, imported Swiss cheese, I
mushrooms, cauliflower, olive, and alfalfa sprouts,
not available for carryout
Good Tuesday, January 23
through Thursday, January 25 ,
314 E. Liberty
I I
, ® o 662-2Q 19
To the Freshmen: it wouldn't be the
DEEEOESE
If there weren't some rumors about it.
Just for the record,
Here are some of the things we're not:
EK[S& -QUARAN"EINEI)
Entirely GROSSE POIN'TE ARISTOCRATS
In the bar 24 hours a day, and so forth.
Come down and see us during Fraternity Rush Week at our
mysterious century old DEKE Chapel, 611'/i E. William Street,
next to White's Market.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON, a Michigan tradition
since 1854, is back on campus.

Page 2-Tuesday, January 23, 1979-The Michigan Daily ..

Att. Gen.
opens car
doors for
18 yr. olds

BY MARY FARANSKI
Following a ruling by State Attorney
General Frank Kelley last week, at
least one local car rental agency has
changed its policy to allow 18- to 21-
year-olds to rent cars.
Three of five local car rental agencies
contacted, however, had been leasing to
people in that age group even before
Kelley's opinion made it mandatory.
ONE RENTAL agency, Henderson
Ford on Jackson Road, is still, not
allowing anyone under 21 to rent cars.
A spokesperson said the company i
forbidden by its insurance company
from renting to these people, and will
not change its policy unless the in-
surance policy changes.
Kelley interpreted two sections of the
1976 Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to
mean that car rental agencies cannot
refuse to lease an automobile to persons
between 18- and 21-years-old.

The rental agency, Econo-Car on
West Huron, changed its policy to con-
form to this law, stating that high in-
surance rates for the 18-21 age group
kept it from renting to this group in the
past.
SPOKESPERSONS for Avis on
Plymouth Road and Hertz on South
Main said that they have always
allowed 18- to 21-year-olds to rent cars,
as long as they own a major credit card.
Major credit cards include Bank
Americard, Visa, and Master Charge.
However, few people under 21 own such
cards.
A spokesperson for the Gene Butman
Leasing Co. on Washtenaw Avenue
suggested that customers own a credit
card, but said the company caters
especially to students and will accept a
cash security deposit.
THE SPOKESPERSON stated that
Butman's insurance company makes
no age distinction for rates. He also said

that the security deposit is lower for
students from EMU and this University
than for other students.
The question of young persons red-
ting cars was brought to Kelley's atter -
tion by State Representative Perry
Bullard (D-Ann ARbor). Bullard's aide,
Lois Work, said that many students
have run into problems when trying tQ
rent a car.
In 1976, Kelley said that car rental
agencies could deny their facilities to
those under 21. However, Section 301-
302 of Elliott-Larsen, effective oft
January 13, 1977, stated that transpor;
tation facilities were among the
"places of public accommodation'
whose services could not be withheld
from individuals on the basis of agen
among other t ings.
A person dehied the protection of the
Elliott-Larsen Act can bring action
against the violating agency in circuit
court.

R

Appeal made to
(Continued from Page 1>

Iranian troops

i

Keep a ood
Thing Going

__

,

would like to remind you that the unity,
security and well-being of the people is
in danger," Gharabaghi told the armed
forces. ,
He said he was sure "that all of you
will not hesitate in performing your
duties." But he said "elements with bad
intentions" were seeking to inflitrate
the ranks of the military "and create
difficulties."
HE APPEA LED to young enlisted.
soldiers, many of whom are believed to
have deep respect for Khomeini, "to

make the best use of the experience of
their commanders."
"The servants of the imperial armed
forces, with decisive will and
patriotism, will overcome their sen-
timents and will endeavor more thanb
before to support the legal gover-
nment."
In his earlier news conference, the
general again denied a coup was plan-
ned.
MEANWHILE, THE Kremlin is
waiting cautiously before adopting a

hero in the turmoils of neighboring
Iran, but it has selected the United
States as its villain, issuing in-
creasingly harsh press attacks this
month.
Western diplomats here say they
have no evidence Moscow is interfering
in Iranian affairs. But they say the
Russians are "watching very closely"
and "getting themselves into a position
where they can try to control events."
Informed sources told reporters in
Tehran that the Soviets were
evacuating villages near the border to
prevent ethnic or religious en-
tanglements with Iranian factions.
THERE WAS No confirmation of the
report in Moscow. But as Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev pointed out
in a statement Nov. 19, the U.S.S.R. is
particularly sensitive to events in the
nation that shares nearly 1,000 miles of
frontier with Soviet Turkmenia, Azer-
baijan and Armenia.
The Soviets may be particularly con-
cerned that the Moslem revival at the

center of the anti-shah movement in
Iran may spill over into Moslem
populated areas of the Soviet Union and
cause unrest against the officially
atheistic government.
The Soviet press this monthaccused
Washington of "political
machinations" in Iran that are "imp
permisslbe and fraught with grave con-e
sequences," of "provocative anti
Soviet inventions" and of backing Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi's army as
America's "last hdpe in Iran."
Early this month, the U.S. Embassy-
formally protested to the Soviets about:
Moscow's media treatment of the U.S.:
role in Iran, referring specifically to a
Pravda article that charged "inad-
missible interference" by U.S. ad-=
visers.
On Saturday, the Soviet Union bluntly:
accused the United States of plotting;
with Iran's "most reactionary forces"
to suppress the people and install a
military dictatorship.

8 Lebanese killed in
Beirut bomb blast

s

,.
" H

YOU'VE FINISHED YOUR JOB TRAINING, YOUR
DEGREE...NW- YOU'RE READY TO CASH IN ON
THOSE TOUGH YEARS, TIME TO MEET A BIGGER
CHALLENGE: A JOB OVERSEAS IN AFRICAASIA
OR LATIN AMERICA WITH THE PEACE CORPS.
YOU VE BEEN MEETING CHALLENGES ALL YOUR
LIFE. INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO PEACE CORPS.
PIERPS

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)-A remote-
control bomb in a car blew up on a
Beirut street yesterday, demolishing a
passing station wagon and killing eight
persons, including Ali Hassan Salameh,
the reputed mastermind of the
massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972
Munich Olympics.
Officials said the explosion also killed
four Palestinian bodyguards in the
vehicle and shrapnel and flying glass
killed three Lebanese pedestrians and
wounded 16 others.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO) said Salameh,
code-named "Abu Hassan,' was fatally
injured when the car, parked near his
heavily guarded home in Beirut's
Moslem sector, was detonated by
remote control as Abu Hassan's station
wagon passed it.
THERE WAS NO official response
from Israel, and the Israeli media gave
only news accounts of the incident
without comment.
Abu Hassan, 36, was the top security
officer of PLO guerrilla chieftain
Yasser Arafat and was chief of the
secret service of Al Fatah, the largest
of the seven PLO factions.
Arafat and other senior political
leaders of the guerrilla movement were
in Damascus, Syria, attending a
strategy session of the Palestinian
National Council, the PLO's parliament
in exile. They are expected to return to
Beirut for the funeral, a PLO
spokesman said.
SHORT or LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
" 615 E. iberty-668-9329
" 3739 Washtenaw-971-9975
" 613 N. Maple-761-2733
" 611 E. University-662-0354

PLO LEADERS in Damascus ap-
peared stunned by the killing, and a
spokesman for Arafat said "Zionist
agents" were responsible.
Arafat, 49, did not comment.
"It was done by Zionist agents," said
Mohmoud Labadi, Arafat's spokesman.
"He (Abu Hassan) is not the first. He is
not the last to die resisting Zionist'
aggression."
Askedy why be blamed Israeli agents
for the killing, Labadi said "they are
the only ones to profit. Who else would
profit from such an attack?"
Fatah put all its forces in Beirut on
alert after the assassination, but a
Fatah spokesman refused to explain
the action.
Abu Hassan allegedly engineered the
Palestinian terroirst attaack on Israeli
athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in
Munich, West Germany, in which 11
(Israelis were killed. He was said to
have been involved in several intra-
guerrilla rivalries and reportedly was
high on Israel's "most wanted list" of
Palestinian guerrilla leaders.

Iverness Country Club;Toldedo. Ohia. Opening for
Assistant Manager. Supervisory work for staff and
maintenance. WSI or Sr, Life Saving Cert. required.
Further details available.
Commonwealth of Virginia offers a one year
internyhip in State Government Administrative
services. Internship begins July 1. :eadline for
applying Mjr. 9. Further details available.
IBM, Rochester, Minn. Summer Program for
students completing their Junior year and ist year
grad students. Field open- everything in engr. and
systems programining. systems analyst. and
applications programming, accounting. et(. anrd
technical writing. Further detailIs available arid
apps.
Dept. of Defense, Virginia Summer intern
program for students who have cnmpleted Junior
,year or better in Political Science t For'eign Affairs &

W~mmea..........................1~mmmmeMM
.= ..............

Intern. Relations. Deadline for applying Feb. 2LB,
Further details available.
Welch Foods. New York. Summer Marketing
Inernship. Student must have completed one year o
their MBA in Marketing. Excellent opening. Details
available. ... s ti
Michael Reese Medical Center'. Chicgo, Ill
Summer Medical Research Fell hwship. Must have
completed Sophomore year. Excellent opportunity.
Further details available. Deadline for applying Jan
2y.
Exxon Chemical Company. Texas. Opening fors
graduate student in industrial hgyiene- should hve'
two semesterSiin organic chemistry and engineering..
Further details available.
IN''ERV IEWS:
Camp 'Towering Pines. Coed, Wisc. Will interview
her' Thurs. Jan. 25 from 9to 5. openings include
waterfrsontWSI r. riflerf photography, riding and
coo0k. Register in person of by phone.

T

it

TRANSFERS REVENUES TO UNDER-BUDGETED AREAS:

Council averts budg

(Continued from Page 1)

*0

Schussff

Councilmember Leslie Morris
questioned the mayor on the financial
feasibility of the project, which Belcher
said would be determined by a study to
be conducted by the proposed board of
directors. The mayor said, "If it is not
self-sustaining, it is not going to go for-
ward."
Sentiment on the part of several
Democrats was that since the city had
chosen not to directly finance "Hands
On" - a children's mu eum - it should

not be extending aid to the theatre
program.
BELCHER THEN accused his op-
position party members of arguing the
issue simply because it is a brainchild
of the Republicans: "I surely hate to see
every issue get politicized," the mayor
declared.
Council also amended a resolution
setting the date for a public hearing on
the proposal to vacate Madison Street
between Packard Rd. and Thompson
Street. The city planning commission

et defieft
has recommended the land be turned
over to the University, but since school
officials have not announced .specific
plans for the area members of the
community have voiced concern
Although the street vacating wils
relieve traffic problems, many citizens;
fear the possible construction of a dor3
.mitory on the site.
The amended resolution set the
hearing for Feb. 26 and at Morris'
suggestion, Council agreed to expressly
invite a University official to par
ticipate.

® ~.
4,
".
k
's/::,.
' " .,
S'
.
s

Forum On
Presidential
Selection:
The Needs of the
University
Students, Campus labor, and
Community are urged to
attend and comment.
Wed. Jan. 24 at 7:30 pm

i

Be a Part of the Big 'U'-
Join The Daily!

Wagner College Study Program
Wagner College "

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan