100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Saturday, January 20, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Astronaut alum

retur

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
and HAROLD BIDLACK
Few universities have had as profound an
impact on our nation's space program as has this
one.
From the designing of equipment used on coun-
tless spacecraft to the education of more than a
dozen astronauts, the University has occupied a
special place, in the history of the U.S. space
program.
Seven of the current 56 astronauts are Univer-
sity graduates. One of them, Col. Afred Worden
(USAF Ret.), returned to campus yesterday to
dedicate a mural depicting the historical
highlights of the University's accomplishments in
space at the Aerospace Engineering Department.
WORDEN WAS commander module pilot on the
Apollo 15 mission's "all Michigan" team, which
included astronauts James Irwin, a 1965 graduate,
and David Scott, a former University student.
The idea for the 24 by 6 foot wall painting came
from aerospace students who wanted to decorate
the lounge in a way commemorating the Univer-
sity's involvement in National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA) programs. The
University initiated the country's first
aeronautical engineering program in 1914.
The mural was painted last summer by Brian
Myers, a sophomore art student at Eastern
Michigan University.
MYERS SAID IT took him 60 hours over a two
month period to complete the mural. -
"I've never done anything like this before," he
said. "I'd like to do more of it," he added.
"I've been interested in space since I was 10. I
used to draw pictures of the Saturn V (the Apollo
launch vehicle) and the Lunar Module (LM)," he
said, beaming.
INCLUDED IN THE mural's scenes, which
range from the Burton Bell Tower on campus to

the space shuttle and planetary exploration, are:
* ballooning-a popular activity in the depar-
tment during the 1920,
" a Lockhead F-104 jet fighter designed by 1933
University graduate Kelly Johnson, who also
designed the U-2 spy plane;
" Astronaut Edward White, a 1959 University
graduate who successfully executed the first
"spacewalk" (extra-vehicular activity-EVA) on
Gemini 4 in 1965. Fellow University alumnus
'There is probably more intelli-
gent life out there (in space) than
there is here. . . . There is life
out there somewhere.'
-Astronaut and 'U'
grad Alfred Worden
James McDivitt was in the spacecraft while White
was making history;
* a lunar-landing scene with the four-wheel bat-
tery-powered "Rover" which was on the Apollo 15
flight;
eSkylab II in 1973 with astronaut Jack Lousma,
a 1959 University graduate and alumnus of Ann
Arbor High.
WHILE HE SHOWED slides of his mission, the
personable and candid Worden spoke of the kind of

ns to 'U'
technology used to get the astronauts into space.
"The majority (of the space program) is still in
the aviation business. Only a small part is in
space," Worden said.
On a humorous note, Worden stated one detail
occupies a lot of the astronauts' time was what
kind of design the Apollo 15 patch emblem would
use. A staggering 583 were considered, and a
Georgia Tech graduate in aeronautical
engineering, Emilio Pucci submitted the winning
design.
Commenting on whether he though extra-
terrestrial life exists somewhere out in space,
Worden said only half seriously, "There is
probably more intelligent life out there than there
is here." Then he commented he has no doubt
"there is life out there somewhere."
Worden said while in lunar orbit, he noticed the
stars were tremendously bright. As an ex-
periment, he turned off all the lights inside the
Command Module to see how bright the stars ac-
tually were. He was surprised to discover he could
read the instrument panel clearly though the only
illumination was that provided by the stars.
Worden urged the students in the audience of
about 50 not to give up hope if their grades were
slightly sub-par. He recalled that he once received
a letter from the dean requesting he not return to
the University after having received poor grades
his first year. Worden then attended the U.S.
Military Academy and later returned to the
University where he earned a Masters Degree in
Aerospace Engineering.
Worden learned how fleeting fame can be at a
space conference last fall in Florida when, after
picking up a moon rock returned by the Apollo 15
mission, he found himself looking down the barrell
of a security guard's gun who thought he was
trying to make off with the precious stone. Wor-
den's simple reply was, "Sorry fella, all I did was
bring it back."

OEM

5

South University only

South University only

LAST FOUR DAYS
0% OFF A9LL BOOKI

through Monday, January 22

12:30-9: 00p.m.

Then we close our South University store for good.
TI1OGSHNDS OF NEW BOOKS* STILL AVAILABLE
IN LL SECTIONS
*used books e all subjects " 3 for $1.00
CENTICOlIE BQOKSIOP
1229 South University

S

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
(AP) - A white police sergeant has
been charged with homicide because of
the death of a black prisoner who was
attacked by a police dog.
Sgt. Joseph Murray, 26, pleaded in-
nocent in a Johannesburg court Thur-
sday. He was ordered to stand trial on
March 13.
The prisoner, Nata Edgar Ndaba,
was arrested April 23 on suspicion of
robbery.

Patriotic pachyderm
This snow-covered elephant was probably longing for milder climates. The
unlikely specimen was sighted foraging in front of the Tamaroff Buick dealership
on Telegraph Rd. in Southfield last Friday.
Wayne's cancer minimal, doctors say

The place is old,

it's a bad
but still a

location
place

everybody wants.
UNION LANES
& PINBALL

LOS ANGELES (AP) -Doctors have
no evidence that John Wayne's cancer
has spread beyond his lymph nodes,
and the 71-year-old actor should be able
to go back to work after a recovery
period, a cancer specialist said yester-
day.
Dr. Carmack Holmes, surgeon and
cancer specialist, said Wayne's

recovery "has been excep-
tional ... and we are very optimistic"
that no further cancer will be found.
Holmes, speaking at a news con-
ference arranged by the UCLA Medical
Center, said the cancer that had spread
from Wayne's stomach to adjacent
lymph nodes was of microscopic size
and was in its very early stages.

Try the

S

A

A

I

LIST PRICE: $ 29.95

LIST PRICE: $89.95

Rm

o

©O

ALL THE SCIENCE YOU NEED-
Factorial- Parentheses- Hyperbolic
Functions .PLUS:
Sx-E x2 Mean -Standard Deviation
of Sample Size ....of Population
... All in a thin, metalic slip of
thing that comes with a wallet case
No recharging! 2 Small batteries
provide 1000 hours of operation
Automatic Power Off

D
128 Programming, Steps
Continuous Memory- will retain program (s) &
data even when turned off
12 Addressable Memories
12 Conditional or Unconditional Branching Locations

a
D

A

) 0 OUR PRICE
Manual Functions includes Mean
and Standard Deviation
Comes with Appliations Manual
with 92 Programs

THE UNIVERSITY CELLAR'S
WARRANTY SUPPORT
On all Sharp Calculators we offer a FULL 60 DAY OVER-THE-
COUNTER EXCHANGE on defective merchandise for an
other Calculator of the same model. Also included in the
y f Warranty Support is the University Cellar Loaner Pro-
aram: On all recharaeable Calculators* purchased at the

a~

U o

©00

OUR PRICE

v v%0 s w 0 %%' w-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan