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January 20, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F' YJ SEE NE 6 APPf4 CALL .DAdY
Spinning and winning
Mitch Margo, a Journalism graduate student, doesn't have to worry
about any more lonely ijghts, now that he's won a ceramic dog and a
white fur throw pillow. Oh, yes, and a $350 china dessert set. Margo
went to California over the holidays to see his girlfriend, and ended up
as a contes ant on NBC's Wheel of Fortune. In an episode aired
yesterday, Mitch won $700 in merchandise and gift certificates to
Giorgio's. But Paula from Pittsburgh outspun him and walked off with
a sports car and the right to return tomorrow. No need to worry for the
University student, though. In Tuesday's episode, Margo won over
$7,000 in prizes. He's back in town, and at the end of those long, cold
days as a TA, we're sure he can be found curling up on his pillow and
sharing desserts with his faithful boxer.
Inaccurate report?
An article in yesterday's Detroit News caught the eyes of several
University administrators. The story describes the contents of a
"needs of the University" statement submitted to the Regents by the
faculty presidential selection committee last month. According to the
article, "The search committee's report to the (University) Regents
suggests that the Ann Arbor campus could be strengthened by
severing ties with its Flint and Dearborn satellites." This upset cer-
tain University officials, especially Dearborn Chancellor Leonard
Goodall, who yesterday alleged that the report is inaccurate. Actually,
it appears as if Goodall's point is well taken. The actual text of the
statement suggests that in the next ten years administrators will need
to clarify "the role and relationship of the Dearborn and Flint cam-
puses vis a vis the Ann Arbor campus."
King 's birthday II
Martin Luther King would have turned fifty last Monday had he
been alive and we ran in this column an item about a state holiday and
local events in honor of the great civil rights leader. We said, incorree-
tly, that the University sponsored no special activities to com-
memorate the event. A staff member from Abeng, a University sup-
ported group, called to inform us that "A Tribute to a Great Man"
was held on the evening of Dr. King's birthday in the Residential
college with a film and poetry reading. We apologize for the oversight.
t3
A;S.
> S,
.,x
Take ten
On January 20, 1969 Richard Milhous Nixon became the 37th
president of the United States. He pledged "to consecrate my office,
my energies, and all of the wisdom I can summon to the cause of peace
among nations." Following Nixon's speech, jeering anti-war demon-
strators tried to stone the president's car during the inaugural parade.
But club-swinging police beat back an attempt by about 1,000
protesters to overrun their lines.
Happenings
FILMS
Cinema II - Stroszek, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild - Young Frankenstein, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old Architec-
ture.

Ann Arbor Film Co-op - The Big Sleep, 7 p.m., The Long Goodbye, 9
p.m., MLB3.
Alternate Action - A Face in the Crowd, 7, 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Mediatrics - Rabbit Test, 7, 8:30, 10 p.m., Nat. Sci. Apd.
Palestinian Human Rights Committee - The Palestinian, Aud. B,
Angell Hall.
Chinese New Year Film Festival - Tiger Cliff, Stardust, 7 p.m.,
Conf. Rms. 4, 5, 6, Union.
SPEAKERS
Pendleton Ctr. - "Rhyme Space," David Oleshansky, John Lucas,
David Thaden, 2 p.m. Pendleton Room, Union.
PERFORMANCES
Music School - Percussive Arts Society, 11 a.m., noon, 1:30 - 3:30
p.m., SM Recital Hall.
Faculty Voice and Piano Recital - Schubert Die Schone Mullerine,
8 p.m., Rackham.
PTP - All Shakespearean program, "This Fair Child of Mine," 8
p.m., Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Building.
Ark - Louis Killen, English ballads, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
SPORTS
Tau Beta Pi - All Engineering Basketball Tournament, 10 a.m.,
Sports Coliseum.
Men's Basketball - Michigan vs. Ohio State, 2:05 p.m., Crisler
Arena
Women's Basketball - Michigan vs. Notre Dame, 4 p.m., Crisler
Arena.
MISCELLANEOUS
International Center - trip to Henry Ford Museum, Greenfield
Village, 10 a.m., - 4 p.m.
Rats
One more reason not to live in Jakarta, Indonesia. Bridegrooms
in the area have been ordered to produce a "dowry" of at least 25 dead
rats for their brides before being allowed to marry officially. An of-

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, January 20, 1979-Page 3'
Daily Official Bulletin

Students to study
health care in China

By JOE VARGO
In what may be the beginning of a
flood of such trips following nor-
malization of relations with the
People's Republic of China (PRC), 23
students from the University's Ann Ar-
bor and Dearborn campuses and
Michigan state will travel this summer
to visit that country and study its health
care system. According to Marilynn
Rosenthal, sociology professor at the
Dearborn campus and project coor-
dinator, the trip to China is the
culmination of a course entitled
"Health Care and the People's
Republic of China." A major goal of the
month-long trip, she said, will be to
examine the U.S. health care system by
comparing it to China's.
"ONE OF THE most powerful ways
to understand our own culture and
health care system is to see it in cross-
cultural perspective," she said. "We
will use the study of the health care
system of China to develop insight into
some of the problems and concerns of
all health care systems, including our
own.
"There are certain issues that all
health care systems confront. But the
Chinese confront some of these issues
with a different perspective than we do.
That different perspective can be quite
enlightening."
Rosenthal said the students will visit
Chinese institutions which affect health
and health care - schools, factories,
medical schools, hospitals, and com-
munes. She added that the group will
also talk to a variety of individuals in-
volved with the health care profession.
Another goal of the trip is to study the
similarities and differences in training
of Chinese and American doctors.
"CHINA HAS a strong commitment
to preventive care," said Rosenthal.
"To accomplish this; they have trained
thousands of paramedics, 'barefoot
doctors,' as they are called. This is an
unusual approach as far as Americans
are concerned. In America, the em-
phasis is on specialized care and the
majority of doctors are specialists.
There is nothing likethe barefoot doc-
tor here."
Another major difference in medical
training, Rosenthal said,"is that both
traditional Chinese and Western

medical practices are taught in
medical schools in China. In America,
we are committed to teaching Western
practices only."
Among the traditional Chinese
methods the group will study is the use
of acupuncture in surgery and other
medical treatments. During the month
in China, the group, consisting mostly
of medicine, medical sociology, health
care planning and administration,
medical social work and nursing
majors will stay in four cities: Peking,
Shenyang, and Harbin in Northern
China and Canton in the South.
"OUR CHINESE hosts are commit-
ted to showing us as much as possible,"
said Rosenthal. "Each city has a par-
ticular quality that makes it worth
studying. Students should be prepared
for a very intensive and comprehensive
trip."
She admitted, however, the cities
were predetermined by the Chinese.
"We didn't have a lot of choice in the
matter," she said.
Rostnthal feels the trip to China holds
important and far reaching im-
plications for the University.d"The
University is interested in providing a
variety of ways for students to learn,"
she said. "One way of learning is the
traditional way: students attending
class and professors lecturing. But
another, dramatic way of learning is
going overseas to study. In this instan-
ce, students will become much more in-
terested in thei own health care system.
Because of this, the China trip provides
an enrichment of their educational op-
portunities."
Although limited in the past because
of strained diplomatic relations, Rosen-
thal believes that a greater foreign ex-
change program between the United
States and China is inevitable.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No.92
Saturday, January 20,1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: $7,00by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Saturday, January 20, 1979
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB-763-4117
Iverness Country Club, Toldedo, Ohio. Opening for
Assistant Manager. Supervisory work for staff and
maintenance. WSI or Sr, Life Saving Cert. required.
Further details available.
Commonwealth of virginia offers a one year
internship in State Government Administrative
services. Internship begins July 1. Deadline for
applying Mar. 9. Further details available.
IBM, Rochester, Minn. Summer Program for
students completing their Junior year and 1st year
grad students. Field open-everything in engr. and
systems programming. systems analyst, and
applications programming, accounting. etc. and
technical writing. Further details available and
apps.
Dept. of Defense, Virginia. Summer intern
program for students who have completed Junior
year or better in Political Science (Foreign Affairs &

intern. Relations. Deadline for applying Feb. 28.
Further details available.
Welch Foods, New York. Summer Marketing
Inernship. Student must have completed one year of
their MBA in Marketing. Excellent opening. Details
available.
Michael Reese Medical Center, Chicgo, Ill.
Summer Medical Research Fellowship. Must have '
completed Sophomore year. Excellent opportunity.
Further details available. Deadline for applying Jan.
25.
Exxon Chemical Company, Texas. Opening for
graduate student in industrial hgyiene-should hve
two semesters in organic chemistry and engineering.
Further details available.
INTERVIEWS:
Camp Towering Pines, Coed, Wisc. Will interview
here Thurs. Jan. 25 from 9 to 5. Openings include
waterfront (WSI), riflery, photography, riding and
cook. Register in person of by phone.

RABBIT TEST

(Joan Rivers) First time on campus. JOAN RIVERS' zany
picture about the first pregnant man played by Billy Crystal.
RABBIT TEST is an energetic, intelligent spoof on traditional
male/female roles.

Sat., Jan. 20

Nat. Sci. Aud.
Admission $1.50

7, 8:30, 10:00

:t

......

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at MLB 3
Saturday, January 20
THE BIG SLEEP
(Howard Hawks, 1946) 7 only-MLB 3
The original and best screen version of Chandler. Detective (HUMPHREY
BOGART) is hired by an ailing, wealthy patriach to investigate the possible
blackmailing of his youngest daughter. As Bog ie begins to uncover motives for
the disappearance of an old friend, he is led to the father's oldest daughter,
LAUREN BACALL: "I like that. I'd like more." Screenplay by William Faulkner.
THE LONG GOODBYE
(Robert Altman, 1973) 9 only-MLB 3
This fabulously entertaining goodbye to the private eye film is quite unlike any
other detective movie ever made-it may be Altman's finest moment. With.,
ingenious cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond (CLOSE ENCOUNTERS AND
McCABE AND MRS. MILLER) and an impeccable cast including STERLING HAYDEN,
HENRY GIBSON, and of course ELLIOT GOULD as Philip Marlowe. "A knock-
out."-TIME.
Monday: Lubitsch's DIE PUPPE and ANNA BOLEYN

Werner Herzog's

1977

St roszek
A modern ballad of alienation and isolation, this film depicts the pilgrimage
of three German misfits to Railroad Flats, Wisconsin in pursuit of the
American Dream.. A street musician (BRUNO S.) convinces his abused pros-
titute friend (EVA MATTES) to immigrate to America with him and an old
man (CLEMENS SCHEITZ). Once here, life disintegrates into a mish-mash of
TV football, C.B. radio and mobile homesteading. It is a tale of pathos and
humor. Burno S. (of Kaspar Hauser fame) offers a mesmerizing performance
in the title role. German with English subtitles (108m)
Sun-D.H. Lawrence's THE VIRGIN & THE GYPSY

s

Mel Brooks' 1975
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN
Brooks' best effort in bedlam brings young Dr. Frankenstein (GENE WILDER)
back to the scene of his famous father's research. Don't go to this film if your
friends hate the way you tell jokes. "Madeline Kahn is funny and enticing .
When-you took at her you see a waterbed at just the right temperature."
-Pauline Kael. With KAHN, MARTY FELDMAN, CLORIS LEACHMAN & PETER
BOYLE (as the monster). Brooks made it right via black and white.
Sun: Arthur Penn's LITTLE BIG MAN
Tues: IVAN THE TERRIBLE (Part 1)

r
a.

Wed-Part 2 of APU TRILOGY-Aporojito

TONITE at
M&9

Angell HaN
aud "A"

$1 .50

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 and 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1 .50

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAIS ADULTSFtI.,sAT.,SUN.
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT" EE. t I0AYS $3.50
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED L MA.-THUR$.EE.s $3.0
FORPRICE OF ONE ALMTON1451

I

WAYSIDE THEATRE WALT DISNEY'S
3020 Washtenaw "IINOCCHIO"
Phone 434-1782

I

L-

om"',

F

kk

I

HAROLD ;
RUHGORDON
BUD CORTD

MON., TUES., THURS. 7-9
FRI. 7-9:25; SAT. 1-3-5-7-9:25
SUN. & WED. 1-3-5-7-9a

PQ

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