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January 19, 1979 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-19

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 19, 1979-Page 7

OSS TO TAKE OVER OPERATIONS:

Union hotel to become dormitory

(Continued from Page 1)
activities, (3) food service alternatives,
and (4) ambience."
Johnson said he would release the
names of the committee members
Monday. He speculated the group
would complete its study by the end of
the current school term.
THE QUESTION of the hotel had
been a controversial issue among
students and administration for several
, 'months. Students lobbying for the dor-
mitory spaces, as well as some ad-
ministrators, felt student housing is a
greater priority than the Union hotel,
which many feel is substandard.
"If you were to make available a
good convention center . . . I would
strongly support its presence on cam-
pus. I don't think the Union rooms are
adequate. The majority of meetings
which come to Ann Arbor utilize the
hotels," Acting University President
Allan Smith said. t

WHEN DEANE BAKER (R-Ann Ar-
bor) asked Johnson about the condition
of dormitory housing, the vice-
president replied that "we (the Univer-
sity) were operating at a 101 per cent
occupancy (level)" last term.
Baker, the lone dissenter in the
group, said he would vote against the"
measure because he "would prefer to
build a new housing unit if we really
need it."
"There is an obligation to a mass of
people," he added, referring to alumni.
THOMAS ROACH (D-Grosse Pointe)
said he sympathized with lifetime
alumni members but "right now . . .
housing is a much more critical need."
David Laro (R-Flint) said he was
convinced of the students' true concern
for the issue when Larry Pulkownik and
Jeff Lebow-organizers of a drive
backing both resolutions-drove
through extremely unfavorable con-
ditions to consult him on the questions.
"As long as there are students like
this around the Union will be well
governed," Laro said.

Mediatrics presents
GOLDFI NGER
SEAN CONNERY as James Bond trying to save the U.S. gold
supply from being turned into radioactive dust. A film that
all James Bond movie fans will appreciate.
Fri. Jan. 19 Nat. Sci. Aud. 7:00, 9:00
RABBIT TEST
(Joan Rivers) First time on campus. JOAN RIVERS' zany picture
about the first pregnant man played by Billy Crystal. RABBIT
TEST is an energetic, intelligent spoof on traditional male/
female roles.
Sat. Jan. 20 Nat. Sci. Aud. 7, 8:30. 10:00

ADMISSION $1.50

,f , w fs~r

_ ..

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19

presents at MLB 3

JohnsOn Baker

Students celebrate Union victory
(Continued from Page 1)

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL
(Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones, 1975) 7 & 10:20-MLB 3
Monty Python's first film was so deliciously silly, even Anita Bryant liked it.
Now the lads of the Circus mess about with King Arthur and the Knights of
the Round Table. Side-splitting visual spoof of chivalry, courtly love, INGMAR
BERGMAN, and Hollywood epics.
THE WRONG BOX
(Bryan Forbes, 1956) 8:40 only-MLB 3
Hilarious British satire based loosely-very loosely-on a Robert Louis Steven-
son story about a tontine. Fabulous comic performances by MICHAEL CAINE,
PETER COOKE, and DUDLEY MOORE (of BEDAZZLED and BEYOND THE FRINGE),
and PETER SELLERS. The climatic chase involves hearses, a resurrected
corpse, two embezzlers, the Salvation Army, three misplaced coffins, a
British military band, and the police (of course).
Tomorrow: THE BIG SLEEP & THE LONG GOOD-BYE
Double Feature Sci-Fi Classics/

-Regents on-the decision. Then a group
Union supporters headed off to a vic-
tory celebration in the student building
itself.
The effort was aided by a drive to
which MSA allocated $500 earlier this
month. It consisted of sending
mailgrams and postcards to the Regen-
ts, distributing flyers, and paying for
student-to-Regent telephone calls from
MSA and UAC offices. Lebow and
others made personal visits to some of
"the Regents.
"WE FOUGHT TO get the job and
now we've got to make the Union
work," said Larry Pulkownik,
president of the Union's Board of Direc-
tors.
"The Union as a student center is
going to make a difference to a hell of a
lot of people."
MSA President Eric Arnson, who was

present when the Regents made their
decision, said that students have
needed a home for 25 years. "I'm ex-
cited," he said. "I'm really very glad to
see it. A lot of credit should go to the
students-Larry and Jeff specifically."
ARNSON ALSO SAID that turning
the Union over to students will change
the energy and activity level in the
Union. "The Union is pertinent to
student life," he said. "We need a Union
that caters to the students."
Arnson also stressed that students
have their work cut out for them to
make the Union successful. "The dif-
ficult parts lie ahead," he said.
Lebow, the MSA representative to the
Union's Board of Directors and the
UPC chairman, said that he has been
interested in making the Union more of
a student center ever since he first en-
tered the Union when he was a fresh-

man.
"WE'VE BEEN talking about
making the Union into a student center
for three years now and we're finally
doing it," said Lebow. "Now we can
shift our efforts to programming and
get students involved in making it a
true student center."
"People have to get involved . .. We
want the support and participation of
students. We've got the place, now let's
make it work."

Lebow added that many student
groups participated in the lobbying ef-
fort, including groups which don't
usually take a stand on any issue.
"We also have to give credit'to the
Regents," Lebow added. "They went
out of their way to listen to what we
said. I think the Regents understand a
lot more about what we are doing
because of the Union. I thinkdour
relationship with the Regents will be a
lot better now."

Cy Endfleld

1962

MYSTERIOUS ISLAND
Enter the wonders of the animation of Ray Harryhausen (Seven Voyages of
Sinbad, Jason and the Ar onauts) with the handful of Confederate prisoners
who escape aboard a balloon which lands them on an island run by Captain
Nemo; an island teeming with enormous bees, overgrown chickens, and
other hybrid creatures in order to (why else?) help create a world food
supply to end starvation and shortages. The beehive scene is unforgettable
and may make you quit using honey. (101 m) 7:00 only

Frat president says
'donors feel proud'

Steve Sekely

1963

Hospital to seek $200
million in state funds

(Continued from Page 1)
been received by the state.
Dalston said it was "very likely" that
the University will receive the amount
desired.
"If we don't receive the funding from
the state, we will alter our plans or seek
some other funding sources," Dalston
said. He added, however, that it is
unlikely that new funding could be
found for the project.
THE PROJECT, which ad-
ministrators have been working on for
several years, drew some discussion
from the Regents about future plans
which weren't specifically outlined in
the recommendation submitted by
Dalston and Vice-President for Finan-
cial Affairs James Brinkerhoff.
Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) criticized ad-
ministrators' intent to begin construc-
tion before all the designing of the
project is completed.
"The architects are only guessing as
to cost, and I think that's a dangerous
way to proceed," Nederlander said.

DALSTON RESPONDED by saying
that there is a degree of risk involved,
but added that it will save money, a
major concern of the planners.
The Regents, however, following the
lead of Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor),
decided the question should not be
discussed at the time, since the specific
issue was not mentioned in the recom-
mendation. Instead, the Regents will
discuss the issue as the process con-
tinues.
According to the proposal, the
present medical center, including Old
Main, is obsolete. The plans include
demolishing the North Outpatient
Building, the Clinical Faculty Office
Building and the Neuropsychiatric In-
stitute wing of Old Main. w
Dalston said the plan will also call for
a decrease in the total number of beds
within the next twenty years. He added
that a study recently conducted by an
outside firm reports the Medical Center
presently has too many beds.
Dalston said hospital services would
not be affected by the construction.

By JOE VARGO
Giving blood is popular, according to
members of the Alpha Phi Omega
fraternity, which has sponsored a blood
drive for the last twelve years.
"We have no problem at all getting
volunteers to donate blood," said Mike
Wheelock, vice-president of services at
Alpha Phi Omega. "In fact, our biggest
problem is just the opposite. We have
too many volunteers. During the
snowstorm last year that shut down the
University, we had to stay open 11
hours one day to accommodate all the
people who had come to donate blood."
WHEELOCK FEELS that publicity is
the key to the success of the week-long
drive. "The answer is publicity," he
said. "We put a lot of effort into our
publicity campaign and the results
have been great. During last Novem-
ber's blood drive, we raised 1,297 pints
of blood, 250 more than our goal." The
goal for the upcoming drive, January
22-26, he added,. is 1,500 pints.
Once the blood is received, it may be
transported to any one of 85 hospitals in
Southeastern Michigan. There, along
with the blood collected from factories
and other universities, it is used to meet
the Red Cross's ever-growing demand
for blood.
Wheelock said there is no reason for
anyone not to give blood. "Giving blood
is not harmful to the body. And it's not
painful, either. There's just a slight

amount of discomfort, but it's less than
a shot. The only persons who shouldn't
give are those who are afraid of
needles," said Wheelock, who admitted
he was "scared to death" the first time
he gave blood.
Those who contribute blood, said
Wheelock, should feel proud that they
have done something of service to the
community. "People are beginning to
realize what the need for blood is," he
said. "And it's a good feeling, knowing
that you've done something that might
save somebody's life."
The APO blood drive will be Monday,
January 22, from 3-9 at Bursley,
Tuesday, January 23 from 3-9 at
Markley and Wednesday through
Friday, January 24-26 from 11-5 at the
Michigan Union.
Women's & Men's
Pocket
Billiard
Tournament
ACU-I
Sign-up
Union Billiards
Open 10am

ffb

THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS
An effective nightmare. The celestial phenomenon of the millenium is
announced-a gigantic meteor storm. The world turns out on their lawns
with lemonade to watch the most spectacular fireworks ever, but unfor-
tunately wakes up the next day totally and irretrievably blind. Some of the
ensuing sequences are horrifyingly spellbinding. As if things weren't bad
enough, there comes a shower of space-born seeds that quickly blossom
into killer plants. An eerie suspenseful thriller that rates among the best.
(93) 9:00 only
PLUS (at both shows):
GORILLA MY DREAMS (Looney Tunes' Robert McKimson, 1944) in
which Bugs Bunny is adopted by a ferocious gorilla couple.

Sat.: Herzog's STROSZEK
Sun.: D.H. Lawrence's VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY

One'show $1.50
Double feature $2.50

Angell Hall
Aud. "A"

Daily Phone Numbers:
Billing-764-0550
Circulation-764-0558
Classifieds-764-0557
Display--764-0554
News and
Happenings-764-0552
Sports-764-0562

Louis Malle's 1971
MURMUR OF THE HEART
A frank and humorous portrait of the coming of age of a young French boy.
The film follows the boy through the various initiations into adulthood at the
hands of two rogue brothers and a confusingly beguiling young mother. With
LEA MASSARI & BENOIT FERREUX. In French (with subtitles) & color. Classic.
SAT: Mel Brooks isn't YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN
SUN: Dustin Hoffman is LITTLE BIG MAN
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GUILD 7:00and9:15$1.50

MOM

W41MEMEM
Im

the Collaborative
winter
art & craft
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