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January 18, 1979 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-18

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Page 10-Thursday, January 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily

By MARY F AR ANSKI
Since Proposal D raised Michigan's
drinking age to 21 about four weeks ago,
the law has caused "confusion" for bar
owners, according to State Senator
Jackie Vaughn III (D-Detroit).
~ Legally, bars cannot keep adults
(those 18 and over) from their
premnises, even if they just come to
4ance or listen to the entertainment.
$ome bars, however, are protecting
t,hemselves by excluding 18-to 20-year-
olds from their premises," Vaughn said
tesday.
:BARS AND STORES caught selling
lquor to minors are subject to a $1,000
Or $2,000 fine, or loss of their liquor
lense, according to Detroit City Coun-
eiman David Eberhard.
+Vaughn, a member of the Michigan
Committee for the Age of Respon-
$ibility (MICAR), has asked State At-
torney General Frank Kelley for his

confuses bar owners

LSA-SG condemns
protest endor sement
(Continued from Page 1)

tha serves alcohol an egalyhbar
customers under 21. Kelley's response
is still pending.
"We want to know if that action is in
. conflict with the Michigan Civil Rights
Act, which prohibits a place of public
accommodation from denying admit-
tance to any person because of religion,
race, color, national origin, age, sex, or
martial status," Vaughn said.
"THE LAW IS causing more con-
fusion than solving problems," he ad-
ded. Vaughn was against changing the
18-year-old drinking law.
Bars in the campus area are admit-
ting 18-to 20-year-olds and stamping the
hands of those 21 and older. Only
customers bearing the stamp may buy
alcohol.
In order to discourage 21-year-olds
from buying for minors, Dooley's ser-
ves drinks in glasses and soft drinks in
mugs, and then "checkers" watch to

see that no one without a stamp has a
A DROP IN attendance since the law
went into effect has been noted by area
bar owners, but a Second Chance
spokesperson said this may also have
been a result of the bad weather.
In order to make up revenue lost
because fewer drinks are being sold,
campus area bars have raised prices of
soft drinks by 10 to 50 cents.
Meanwhile, the Detroit City Council
passed a proposal last Thursday that
will set a maximum $5 fine for minors
caught drinking in the city. The
proposal was sent to the Corporation
Council for final drafting, with the
results expected to be passed in two
weeks.
DRINKING BY minors in Detroit is
currently a misdemeanor, usually with
a penalty of $500, 90 days in jail, or both.
A newly-enacted state law sets the fine
at $25 for the first offense, $50 for the

second, and $100 for the third. lwwil
be more strictly enforced under the $5
penalty than it would be if Detroit adop-
ted the state's system. .
"Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Lansing
currently have the $5 penalty. If Detroit
passes it, more cities may follow and
the state may reconsider the law',
Eberhard said.
FROM THE MOUTH OF
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - San Jose
State football coach Lynn Stiles was
thrown for a loss by a recent conver-
sation with a fan.]
"One day after practice," Stiles said,
"This fan came up to me and said it was
the toughest season he had seen in his
five years rooting for our team. The fan
was all of ten years old."

the lecture. During the lecture, violence
brokea outat a demonstration.inLast
clarify LSA-SG's position on the mat-
ter.-
"I didn't like the endorsement
coming from the LSA-SG Advocacy
Coordinator (Stechuk)," said Sharon
Krevor of the United Students for Israel
(USI). "But the students were pleased
with Sunday's meeting and I commend
Bob Stechuk for calling it."'
The USI had some reservationis about
the resolution. "It wasn't strong enough
because the group actively endorsed
the protest," said USI member Jeffrey
Colman. "They must make an active
rescindment. But I was generally
pleased."
THE MOTION states that "LSA-SG
regrets the disparity between the
original intent of the endorsement and
the results; and will take steps to en-
sure that such occurrences do not hap-
pen again."
The other resolution was tabled by
the group pending further discussion by
a committee established to draw up
more guidelines for future endorsemen-
ts. The resolution now states that "LSA-
SG must see the final res'ult of all
projects or . . . receive a detailed

guarantee of the result before it makes
endorsemenlts "
In other actions, the council passed a
resolution to support the Farm Labor
Organizing Committee (FLOC) which
has initiated a boycott against Libby's
and Campbiell products due to their
failure to negotiate with FLOC. The
resolution urged all students to par-
ticipate in the boycott, and pledged
LSA-SG to lobby the University, asking
them to cut ties with the corporations,
including the purchasing of their
products.
THEY ALSO unanimously supported
a resolution protesting Athletic Direc-
tor Don Canham's resistance to im-
plement Title IX directives from the
Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, which calls for equal resour-
ces for men and women's sports in
schools receiving government funding.
The council requested an in-
vestigation questioning Canham's
resistance be held jointly by University
administrators and students. Canham
rationalizes inequality in the men's and
women's sports programs at the
University.
LSA-SG also unanimously passed a
resolution showing support for student
control of the Michigan Union.

Students to rally for
'Union dormitory

(Continued from Page 1)
space."
Acting University President Allan
Smith has also backed the student fac-
tion.
"I'M RECOMMENDING they
(University administrators) get out of
the hotel business," Smith said.
Lebow, the MSA representative to the
Union Board of Directors, speculated
that "at least 300 (post) cards were sent
to the Regents (supporting converting
the hotel's conversion to dormitory
space)."
The two drive organizers said they
are upset about a third possibility for
the hotel which is included in this mon-
th's Regents agenda. The alternative,
presented by Brinkerhoff and Johnson,
would call for a main desk to be con-
structed on the south side of the
building without providing for a new

southern entrance, as would the
original plan.
THE CHANGES ,would also include
refurnishing and redecorating 32 of the
105 Union hotel rooms. The plan will
cost only half of the $530,000 called for
by the original hotel refurnishing
proposal.
Lebow blasted the new plan, which he
said "would refurbish the hotel in a
half -assed'way."
The MSA member added that there
have been problems with a lack of rap-
port between the hotel guests and
students.
"We've already proven a student ac-
tivities center is not compatible with a
hotel," Lebow said. He said one exam-
ple of friction between the two groups
occurred during last year's Michigras
party, when boarders complained
about the noise within the building.

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