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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FYCUSEE NSMCPM L Y
A shakey star
The Daily has learned, through numerous street sources, that Ann
Arbor's own Shakey Jake is peddling copies of his very own cassette
tape recording-"The Greatest Hits of Shakey Jake." The Daily had
hoped to use this space to review this classic collection, but a citywide
search of all of Jake's known hangouts has as of yet failed to turn up
either a copy of the rare tape or even Jake himself, the only known
distributor. Anyone knowing Jake's whereabouts, or owning a copy of
the tape, please contact the Daily.
We were wrong
In an article appearing in yesterday's Daily, we incorrectly stated
that Eastern Michigan University has an elected Board of Regents.
Actually, EMU's board is appointed by the governor. Wayne State
University, not listed among those state institutions with elected
boards, does in fact have a publicly chosen board. We regret the error.

Another oops
The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), a union attempting to
secure bargaining rights for University Cellar employees, was
incorrectly identified as the "International" Workers of the World in
an article appearing in yesterday's paper. We regret the error.
Naughty vicious
Punk rocker and perrenial bad guy Sid Vicious will be out on bail
again. Vicious, once guitarist with the now-defunct Sex Pistols punk
rock band, has been released on $10,000 bond for assaulting Todd
Smith, brother of rock star Patti Smith. Sid was already free on $50,000
bail on charges that he fatally stabbed his girlfriendwhen he allegedly
struck his latest victim in the head with a beer mug at a Manhattan
nightclub. Manhattan Supreme Court Justice James Leff, who freed
Vicious after this latest assault, evidently took into consideration the
punker's good character and solid community reputation.
Up in smoke
Cigarette smoking can be rude and sometimes downright obnoxious.
Take the case of former letter carrier William McCracken of Raleigh,
North Carolina. Back in 1975, McCracken's boss blew tobacco smoke
into his face during a meeting which was called to discuss smoking
conditions in the Charlotte post office. The irritated McCracken,
allergic to smoke, filed a $75,000 lawsuit claiming his superior caused
him "great bodily harm." Earlier this week, McCracken's attorney
asked the N.C. Court of Appeals to allow a jury to consider whether
blowing smoke in someone's face constitutes assault.
A corny tale
A burglar who repeatedly visited the world reknowned Uncle Bob's
Popcorn stand in Tucson, Arizona hasn't taken much in his hauls from
the corn popper except well, you guessed it - popcorn. In a recent
visit, the mysterious muncher left a complimentary note that read,
"Wow, Uncle Bob's sure makes great popcorn-your friendly
burglar." The latest midnight caper, however, the bandit's third
strike in six months, will probably be his last. "I'm not going to rob
you anymore," a note read. "You have nothing worth stealing." That
Uncle Bob must pop a mean kernel.
Take ten
On January 18, 1969-two days before Richard Nixon took office -
South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond warned a meager audience
at Hill Auditorium of the drive toward international Communism.
Thurmond hardly started his address when a heckler dressed in a
sheet with a white, pointed hat rudely interrupted him. Thurmond
stressed that the United States must attain nuclean superiority over
the Soviets. "Remember this war is being run from Moscow," he said.
"The war will be stopped any time that Moscow gives the word, and
not before."
Happenings
FILMS
A-V Services - VD: The Plague of Love, 12:10 p.m., Aud., SPH II.
Mediatrics - Ford's Stagecoach, 7, 8:40 p.m., Assembly Hall,
Union.
Cinema Guild - Welles' Citizen Kane, 7,9:15 p.m., Old Arch Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Equus, 7; Exorcist II, 9:30 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell.
PERFORMANCES
Pendleton Center - "New Words, New Words," open readings of
new plays, 7:30 p.m., 2nd floor, Union.
Guild House -poetry reading, Ed Burrows, 7:30p.m., 802 Monroe.
Music School - piano chamber music, 8 p.m., SM Recital Hall.
SPEAKERS
Medieval and Renaissance Collegium - Nicholas Steneck, associate
chairman of history department, "From Chaucer's Physicians to
Charles V Astronomer; Trends and Prospects form late Medieval
Science," noon, Room 204, Tappan Hall.
Geology and Mineralogy - F.A. Jenkins, Jr. of Harvard University,
"Interpreting Mammalian Origins: The Paleontological and
Experimental Evidence," 4 p.m., Room 4001, C. C. Little.
Hillel Foundation - Alison Adams, "Introduction to doing
Archeology in Israel," 7:30 pm., 1429 Hill St.
MEETINGS
Michigan Economics Society - meeting, 5 p.m., Room 301, Econ
Building.
MISCELLANEOUS
Michigan Economics Society - TGIT (Thank God Its Thursday)
Party, 5 p.m., 3rd floor, Econ Building.
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom - "The War
Tax Dilemma," 8 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 South Fifth
Ave.'
Siddha Meditation - Siddha Yoga Dham is sponsoring a free
introductory program to Siddha Meditation, January 22, 7:30 p.m.,
1520 Hill St.
Look out below!

Rising temperatures and last week's heavy snowfall are the perfect
ingredients for snow slides. Snow, piled on slanted roof tops, has the
tendency to loosen up, slide off, and possible white wash unsuspecting

I

By HOWARD WITT
Even in 1848 University students
were short of cash, often writing
prudently formal versions of the
familiar "Dear Dad, I'm fine, please
send money" letter. Many such letters,
along with 250,000 historical
photographs and over 22 million
documents relating to University and
state history, can be found in the Ben-
tley Historical Library on North Cam-
pus.
From the trivial complaints con-
tained in the "Dear Father" letters, to
an extensive personal diary covering
the controversial 1876 election cam-
paign, the library offers a unique in-
sight into the diversity of earlier times.
"MANY OF THE people represented
in our collections were not 'big' people.
They were 'workers in the field,' but
were often keen observers of their
time," noted Robert Warner, director
of the Bentley Library and the
Michigan Historical Collections.
The library does have records of the
'big' people too. Personal papers, let-
ters, drafts, and photographs of state
senators, governors, University
presidents, and notable Michigan
figures fill thousands of collection
boxes and yards of microfilm.
"The records of contemporary
figures are increasing enormously in
bulk," Warner explained. "The new
Gerald Ford Library will have as many
presidential documents as the Franklin
Roosevelt Library-Ford was in office
for two and a half years, Roosevelt was
president for twelve."
IN ACTUALITY, modern historical
figures probably are not producing
more paper than their earlier counter-
parts because the convenience of phone
conversations and efficient transpor-
tation have eliminated the need for
many written correspondence. The in-
creasing number of documents seems
to emerge, therefore, because of the
greater care taken not to discard
anything that might be of historical
value.
"How can you know for certain
what's going to be important?" Warner
asks. "When we recently reprocessed a
wartime senator's papers we found a
four-page letter from a 22-year-old en-
sign in South Carolina. Fortunately it
was kept-the author was John F. Ken-
nedy and he was giving his whole
rationale for the coming of World War
II in Europe. "
. Of course not all material proves to
be so valuable, consequently the
library's historians are trained to
discriminate between documents. "We
do make judgments with respect to
material," said Curator of Manuscripts
Thomas Powers. "But if there's even
the slightest question of possible
historical value, we keep the
document."
THE LIBRARY does have 22 million
documents, so a great deal of material
is kept. Papers come in a variety of
shapes and sizes, and in various states
of order and disorder. "If a box has
been in a farmer's attic somewhere, we
fumigate it first," Warner commented.
Powers uses an analogy to describe
the process of organization: "A book
comes with a table of contents and an

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, January 18, 1979-Page 3
History lives at Bentley library
,W,- --m., - Y

uaiiy rnoto Dy ANOY FREEBERG
Researchers at the Bentley Historical Library are studying the library's many files to obtain a unique perspective on history.

index; a box of documents does not. Our
job is to create such a table of conten-
ts."
The modern library building houses
the entire Michigan Historical Collec-
tion, most of which is contained in
boxes in the windowless archives area.
The archives are protected by an ex-
tensive fire extinguishing system em-
ploying halon gas, which causes no
damage to manuscripts..
WARNER ESTIMATES that storage
facilities at the library will not be
exhausted for about four more years,
after which an increasing amount of
microfilm will have to be used, or more
archive space constructed.
Last year, Warner said, scholars
from 17 countries came to utilize
library resources, in additon to hun-
dreds of University students, faculty
members and Michigan citizens.
Although many researchers and
other interested persons visit the
library, some more obscure individual
collections and documents may receive
only occasional attention. "We consider
ten readers per year heavy use. We
might have a collection that would be
here three years before anyone wanted
to look at it, but if it's valuble for that
person, it's valuable to us," Warner
commented.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXIX, No.90
Thursday, January I8, 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109;
Publ~hed daily Tuesday through Sundaymorning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters): $13 by mail.
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor:;$7,0by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Mlediatrics presents
STAGECOACH
(John Ford, 1939) JOHN WAYNE'S first major film role as The Ringo Kid in this
classic Western. Eight previously unrelated people find their lives inter-
tangled aboard a westbound stagecoach. This film contains what is perhaps
the greatest Western chase sequence ever filmed.
Thurs., Jan. 18 Assembly Hall, Mich Union 7, 8:40, 10:20
GOLDFINGER
SEAN CONNERY as James Bond trying to save the U.S. gold supply from being
turned into radioactive dust. A film that all James Bond movie fans will
appreciate.
Fri., Jan. 19 Nat. Sci. Aud. 7:00, 9:00
RABBIT TEST
(Joan Rivers) First time on campus. JOAN RIVERS' zany picture about the
first pregnant man played by Billy Crystal. RABBIT TEST is an energetic,
intelligent spoof on traditional male/female roles.
Sat., Jan. 20 Nat. Sci. Aud. 7, 8:30, 10:00
ADMISSION $1.50

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud A
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18
EQUUS
(Sidney Lumet, 1977) 7 only-AUD A
A shattering transferral of the hit play to the screen. A phlegmatic psychiatrist
envies the passion of a boy who blinded horses, and fears that curing the boy
will doom him to mediocrity. The psychological probing of the boy's past, the
haunting scenes of the present, and the violent climax are mesmerizing.
RICHARD BURTON in a powerful comeback role; PETER FIRTH in an intense,
haunting perforrhance as Alan Strong. With JENNY AGUTTER.
Exorcist II: The Heretic
(John Boorman, 1977) 9:30 only-:AUD A
RICHARD BURTON tries to unravel the mystery of the demon still living inside
LINDA BLAIR. "The picture has a visionary, crazy grandeur . . . it's winged
camp-a horror fairytale gone mad. There's enough visual magic in it for a
dozen good movies."-Pauline Koel. "Surpasses THE EXCORCIST."-Martin
Scorsese. With LOUISE FLETCHER, JAMES EARL JONES, and MAX VON SYDOW.
Tomorrow: MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL
& THE WRONG BOX

.

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGNT"I
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FORPRICEOFONEJ

ADULTS FRI.,SAT.,$SUN.
EVE. i HOLIDAYS $3.50
MON.-THURS.EVt. $3.00
ALL MATINEES $2.50
CHILD TO 14 $1.90

I

i

a CHLDIlO $.30I

I

MANN THEATRESADMISSION
ILLSAGET*" Adult $4.00
MAPLE VILLAGESHOPPING T(-1 NTEC ild $2.
169-1300'Child $2.00
r SHOWTIMES
Mon-Fri
1 6:30
Sat & Sun
1:45
3:45
6:30
9:00
Tickets on Sole
. 15 minutes prior
i to showtime.
Bo4ySnacbe $S
:... " .. . NO PASSES
SHOWTIMES
Mon-Fri

I

Friday & Saturday Late Show
"PINK FLOYDi''

1

ISTATE "PINKFLOYD!" 1

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