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January 17, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-17

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r'
1F OUSEE NN S HAPPV MCAILL DIY
Council clowns
Part I City Council Monday
night raged an undecisive debate
over what to do with mounting
amounts of garbage disposed by
Ann Arborites. They also touched
on prospects for a new city
landfill. Concluded Mayor Louis
Belcher, "I believe this is fertile
area for future discussion."
Part II. The esteemed Richard
Robinson, better known by the
humbler title of Dr. Diag, also.
made an appearance. He y..
addressed the council, saying,
"You guys take a lot of guff from
a lot of different factions. I just
want to go down on the record
that I think you're the greatest
city council in America." At least
someone thinks so.
Belcher
Through rain, sleet,
but not revolution
The revolution in Iran has begun to have immediate impact in Ann
Arbor. Since January 10, there has been a complete embargo on mail
to that country. A spokeswoman for the post office department said
yesterday that if you're trying to send a message to friends, relatives,
revolutionaries, members of the military, or just about anyone in Iran;
hold onto it. She added that it is impossible to tell when the embargo
will be lifted.
Computer counseling '
The electronic age is aiding the path of medical science. A newly
announced computer link-up of the University's Mott Children's
Hospital with a new national computer network will improve
treatment and advance understanding of birth defects. The network,
which is part of the new Birth Defects Information System funded by
the National Foundation-March of Dimes, links hospitals with a
central computer at Massachusetts Institute of RTechnology where
infomation on any one of 1,000 different birth defects is available. Roy
Schmikel, University professor of pediatrics and genetics researcher,
explained that the system will be used to treat children and exchange
and compile information on birth defects. Accurate diagnosis will now
be right at the doctor's fingertips.
Editor's Note:
It's bound to be a great disappointment to many of you, but
yesterday we received the following letter from Ken Shaw
Productions: "URGENT. Editor note: Please be advised that the
"Paul Anka Show" which was scheduled for February has been
postponeddue to extended recording contract commitment. Will
advise on new date." We'll keep you posted.
Take ten
On January 17, 1969, the Regents voted unanimously to abolish the
Univesity's requirement that sophomore women and all freshpersons
live in dormitories. The Regents stipulated, however, that parental
permission would be required for freshpersons and women under 21
wanting to live off-campus. Prof. Frank Braun of the German
department had recommmended that the residency requirement for
freshpersons be retained. "My fear is that innocent green freshmen
are going to be exposed to the raw realities of Ann Arbor real estate,"
he contended. Nowadays, only students under 18 - and lacking
parental permission - are required to live in University housing.

Racial bias in schools
Racial biases in school systems are no less pervasive than they were
ten years agom just more subtle, said a University educator. "The
issues are the same, but the form they are taking is somewhat
different," said Charles Moody, associate director of the University's
Program for Educational Opportunity, a federally funded
desegregation assistance center. Moody will be in Washington DC this
Saturday for the dedication of the new national headquarters of the
National Alliance of Black School Educators. "Within the classroom,
the multi-ethnic curriculum is still on the drawing board," Moody
said. "Some elementary textbooks have been revised to include faces
of different colors, but the central character - the heroes of the
stories - nearly always continue to be white."

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 17, 1979-Page 3.

U.S. THREA TENS TO WITHDRAW SUPPOR T:

Somoza warned to OK mediation

WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. officials
have warned Nicaraguan President
Anastasio Somoza that the U.S.-led in-
ternational mediation effort will be
suspended if he rejects new proposals
aimed at averting renewed civil war in
his country, sources say.
According to the informants, who
asked not to be identified, U.S. Am-
bassador William Bowdler told Somoza
that the latest proposals represent the
'minimum acceptable basis for further
negotiation which has any hope of
receiving a national consensus."

authority composed of representatives
of the government and the opposition. A
parallel international body would exer-
cise close supervision over the process.
THE PROPOSAL represents a com-
promise between Somoza's insistence
on Nicaraguan control over the
plebiscite and an opposition demand
that the voting be supervised by outside
monitors.
The mediators and opposition groups
are asking that there be an up-or-down
vote on whether Somoza would remain
in office or resign immediately. Somoza
has said that if he lost a plebiscite, he

ceptance of the proposal would be
"polarization and radicalization" in
Nicaragua and the possibility of
"repressive counteraction" by the
Nicaraguan national guard.
IT WAS understood that if Somoza
refuses to agree to the new proposals,
the administration is prepared to show
its displeasure by recalling the U.S.
ambassador from Managua or with-
drawing the American military
mission. Another option would be a
cutoff of the estimated $40 million in
U.S. aid earmarked for Nicaragua.

The administration already has said
Nicaragua will not receive any new
economic or military aid during the
current fiscal year.
Bowdler and his mediation team
colleagues began negotiations in Oc-
tober, shortly after a two-week civil
war in Nicaragua that resulted in about-
1,500 deaths.
The mediators have been trying to
arrange a settlement between Somoza
and the Broad Opposition Front; a
grouping of anti-Somoza business.,
political, labor and religious leaders..

"There will be 'polarization and radicalization in
Nicaragua if Somoza doesn't accept U.S. proposals."
-U.S. Ambassador William Bowdler

SOMOZA ALSO was told that his
refusal to go along could result not only
in renewed fighting in Nicaragua but a
U.S. decision to disassociate itself from
Somoza's government, the officials
said.
The three-month-old mediation ef-
fort, which has involved the United
States, the Dominican Republic and
Guatemala, has been stalled over the
terms of a national plebiscite to deter-
mine whether Somoza would remain in
office..
The new proposal, presented to
Somoza on Friday, calls for the for-
:mation of a national plebiscite

would stay on as president but would
give the opposition a proportional share
of power.
This difference would be subject to
negotiation if Somoza agreed in prin-
ciple to accept the mediators' proposal.
OFFICIALS HAVE said that 1,200 to
1,500 foreign election monitors would be
recruited from the United States and
other members of the Organization of
American States.
Somoza agreed to a request by the
mediators to give his answer by next
Friday.
Bowdler is reported to have told
Somoza that the alternatives to his ac

Ann Arbor Civic Thetre Auditions
LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC
JANUARY 17-MASS MEETING-7:30 pm
JANUARY 17, 18, 19, : 20th call backs
ROLES AVAILABLE 6 WOMEN ages 13-70
3 men ages 20-50
The Liebeslieders, persons of the community
(2 sopranos, I mezzo, Tenor, Baritone)
ALL ROLES ARE SINGING ROLES THE MUSIC IS SOMEWHAT DIFFICULT.
Auditions by appointment only, sign up after the mass meeting. There are
a few non speaking roles, call the director if interested.
Anyone interested in participating in the A.A.C.T. production of Little
Night Music-is invited to come to the, A.A.C.T. Workshop Bldg., 201
Mulholland. (off W. Washington) Wednesday, January 17th-7:30 pm sign up
for an audition time for cast and orchestra. All interested in set building,
costume construction, light,-make up, prop crew, programs, publicity, box
office, ushering are cordially invited.
Director Susan Morris-761-6086 (H) 764-5345 (W)
Producer Carol Deniston-761-2247 after 3 pm
Musical Director Bradley Bloom
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud. A
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17
(John Ford, 1952) THE Q UIET M AN 7 .AUD. A
JOHN WAYNE returns to the Irish town of his birth with a claim on his family's
estate and a secret in his past. The film is a small masterpiece, a quiet celebra-
tion of everything it concerns. With MAUREEN O'HARA and a host of outstanding
character actors.
THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE
(John Ford, 1962) 9 only-AUD. A
Ford's most personal film, the poignant culmination of, fifty years of filmmaking.
Ford uses a simple story (a senator returns to a western town for the funeral of
a pauper and tells a reporter the true story of who shot Liberty Valance) to
explore the conflict between reality and symbol, truth and legend, memory and
conscience. Probably the masterwork of one of America's greatest artists. Stars
JOHN WAYNE, JIMMY STEWART, LEE MARVIN, VERA MILES.
Tomorrow: EQUUS & EXORCIST II: THE HERETIC

Nixon invited to
White House dinner

WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Carter invited Richard Nixon to a for-
thcoming White House dinner honoring
China's vice premier because "it
seemed like the decent and proper thing
to do," a White House spokesman said
yesterday.
"President Nixon had taken the first
step toward normalization with China,"
White House press secretary Jody
Powell told reporters.
POWELL ALSO said former
President and Mrs. Gerald Ford also
were invited to the dinner for Vice
Premier Teng Hsiao-ping Jan. 29, but
they are touring the Middle East and it
is not clear whether they will{be able to
attend.
Powell said Nixon has accepted the
invitation, but "it is my understanding
Mrs. Nixon will not be able to come."
ALSO INVITED was former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger,
who made the first breakthrough trip to
China. Kissinger promptly accepted.
Powell explained that Nixon and
Ford had "taken the first steps" toward
U.S. recognition of China.
"This visit is very symbolic of the
.:
._ x
Daily Official Bulletin
...:}L: . .....:.....,v....r.. .._.: :.+:....::::L.. . :"iiif.i::.. . . . .i
WednesdayJanuary 17, 1979
Daily Calendar
Academic Women's Caucus, Margaret Leary &
Janice Lindberg, SACUA Members, "Issues Related
to SACUA and Women," 3050 Frieze, noon.
Physics/Astronomy: J. Wesley, General Atomics
Co., "Recent Progress Towards Fusion Power," 296
Dennison; N. Fleishon, LBL, "Inelastic Compton
Scattering in Two-Dimensional QCD,"20'R Randall, 4
p.m.
Statistics: David Neuhoff, "Universal Data Com-
pression," 451 Mason, 4p.m.
Prog. in Comparative Literature: Richard Oh-
mann, Wesleyan-U., "Class Language and Political
Consciousness," Rackham Amph., 4:10 p.m.

I

Nixon
completion of the recognition," he said.
Asked whether the White House
thought the invitation to Nixon, who
resigned from the presidency following
Watergate scandal revelations, would
be anaffront to some of the American
people, the presidential spokesman
said:
"There isn't any decision that he
(Carter) has made that wouldn't make
some people mad."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No.89
Wednesday, January 17, 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.sSubscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7,00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

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.1

Now Showing, Campus Area Butterfield Theatres

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" ST NIGHT"
$1.50 ugtil 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
I i RICEOF ONEJ

ADULTS FRI., SAT., SUN
EVE.& HOLIDAYS $3.50
MON..THURS. EVk. $3.40
ALL MATINEES $2.30
CHILD TO 14 $1.50

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Happenings

FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - The Quiet Man, 7, The Man Who Shot
Liberty Valence, 9, Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
SPEAKERS
Program in Comparative Literature - Richard Ohmann "Class,
Language and Political Consciousness," 4:10 Rackham.
Graduate School of Business, William Hoglund, "Opportunities in
Corporative Accounting", 4 p.m., Hale Auditorium, Graduate School
of Business.
Chemical Engineering - Brice Carnahan Fortran-IV Programming
Language, 7:30, Natural Science Auditorium.
MEETINGS
International Center - "Digging up the Past", a program about a
archaeological digs abroad, 7 p.m., International Center Recreation
Room.
MISCELLANEOUS
Hopwood Awards - Poetry reading and award presentation, 4 p.m.
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Science for the People - The Ohio Workers Strike, 7:30 p.m.

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