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January 16, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-16

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9.

Page 10-Tuesday, January 16, 1979-The Michigan Daily
High Court will take
CIA letters case

Tennis pro slams

divestment

(Continued from Page 1)
convicted murderers in Arkansas and
Alabama, who had claimed that the
capital punishment laws under which
they were condemned do not, conform to
Supreme Court guidelines.
* Refused to review an appeals court
order that kept alive a lawsuit that
seeks to racially balance public schools
in East Baton Rouge (Parish county).
La.1
" Declined to involve itself in a 13-
year-old legal fight over alleged on-the-
job racial bias at a Birmingham, Ala.,
factory.
Laboratory tests have shown that
hermit crabs are able to survive
more accelerative and decelerative
force than man or any other animal,
says National Geographic:

In the CIA case, a group of persons
who learned that their mail had been
opened sued present and former of-
ficials of the agency in 1975.
The "class action" suit representing
the claims of numerous persons was
filed in Rhode Island, where math
professor Rodney Driver, one of the
persons seeking the damages, lives.
None of the government officials
named in the suit lives in Rhode Island,
but U.S. District Judge Raymond Pet-
tine ruled that a 1962 law passed by
Congress empowered him or any
federal trial judge to bear the case.
The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
upheld Pettine's ruling.as it applied to
government officials in office at the
time the suit was filed'
Others who had already left their
government jobs-16 defendan-
ts-could not be sued in any federal
court but only in those jurisdictions
where they now reside, the appeals
court said.

(Continued from Page 1)
claimed as one of the world's greatest
tennis players, is a 1966 UCLA graduate
in business administration, and is a
consultant for Aetna. He discussed
career planning, youth's attitudes
about business, and business' attitudes
of social responsibility. The event was
co-sponsored by the Office of Career
Planning and Placement and Aetna
Life and Casualty Co., a company that
conducts recruiting sessions through
the office.
"Never forget why you are here while
you are here," Ashe said. He urged
students to utilize the Placement Office
early in their academic careers - as
freshpeople if possible. "Some seniors
end up scrambling for jobs in
April ... the smart student will have
his job lined up two years before he
graduates."
Recommending that students write to
several companies they are interested
in and ask for advice in course selection

and possible internships, Arthur Ashe
assured they would write back. "Com-
panies would love .to hear from
you .. . (they) love interns," because
an intern of two or three summers will
save them money in training new
workers. "Aetna is no exception. Forty
per cent of the minority entry-level ap-
plicants quit in two years (compared to
a 15 per cent rate for whites), wasting
money, which results in higher
premiums for your parents." Accor-
ding to Mr. Ashe, this is exactly what
business is trying to avoid.
"YOUNG PEOPLE got turned off by
business in the '60's," said Ashe,
because they were frustrated with the
profit-hungry management, who didn't
seem to care about society or the en-
vironment. But "I think now the
business world has changed," he said.
"There has been a succession of new
ideas, new leaders with more social
concern in the last ten years."
The field of money and banking and

the investment field, though not
popular today, are crucial to society,
said Ashe, describing these fields as
"not very glamorous, but they built this
University and are paying your tuition.
Many people today are opposed to
government meddling - who else is
going to (change conditions)?
Businesses, which have the potential
for close contact with their com-
munities, will have to feed the poor, pay
for the defense system, and help the
people on welfare. So you can't turn
your back on the business world."
Ashe was also concerned with the
topic of readjustment in our
technological society - it affects
college students. "A college education
doesn't guarantee you lifetime
security. In four years you could be ob-
solete. Life for you will be a constant
state of re-adjustment." Urging people
to have foresight in planning their
futures, instead of just "worrying about
your next exam," Ashe again stressed

L
-,
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K

1-STOP SHOPPING SAVES MONEY, TIME, ENERGY

11 JiAI I

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I

thrift acr-

s
mm
r

PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1979.
TO LIMIT SALES ACCORDING TO SPECIFIED LIMITS.
STITUTIONS OR DISTRIBUTORS.

MEIJER RESERVES THE RIGHT
NO SALES TO DEALERS, IN-

the importance, especially for minority
students, of consulting the Placement
Office and getting the necessary infor-
mation to secure a job early.
TRYING TO turn around the trend
for minority youths to believe in jock-
idols, Ashe said, "I'm really down on
kids wanting to be professional
athletes. We take this too far, too long
and waste too much time on it. For
every one O. J. Simpson, there are
10,000 failures - high school basketball
players who quit school on hardship
cases, didn't make the pro teams, then
were left with nothing - no job and no
school."
Ashe also expressed disagreement
with the federal judge's decision
restraining the U.S. government from
revoking a visa for South African
heavyweight boxer Kallie Knoetze,
allowing him to fight in Miami Beach
Saturday. Knoetze shot a 15-year-old
black child in both legs during a protest
in 1977, and although he was acquitted
of all charges in this incident, he was
convicted for coercion in the same
year. Ashedsaid "he shouldn'thave
been allowed to (box). Not because he
is a South African, but because of these
occurrences..
The University has not divested from
corporations that do business in South
Africa. Ashe said he agrees with this
stand, and believes that in time, South
Africa's acute labor shortage will force
the companies to hire non-whites, for-
cing the standard of living up, although
segregation may continue. "I have
been to Soweto several times, and once
spent four months in South Africa, and I
know the segregation is bad, but ask a
starving man which he would rather
have: three meals a day or the right to
vote? Any improvement there will be
based on economics," and according to
Ashe, this means the U.S. must stay.
City
suffers
deep
freeze
(continued from Page 1)
NOT ALL OF the effects of the bad
weather on Stejskal were negative, sin-
ce the departure of his girlfriend, who
was visiting from the University of
Illinois, was ; delayed. "Flights were
cancelled from Detroit to Chicago and
the result was that she had to leave at
eight o'clock at night, instead of 10:20
this morning," said Stejskal with thinly
disguised glee.
Among others who profit from the
cold spell are / the suppliers of cold
weather clothing. Sales of winter
jackets are up, according to Eleanor
Everlove of Jacobsons. "A lot of people
who weren't familiar with the climate
have had to come in to buy winter
jackets," she said.
Some people may choose to beat the
cold by more direct means, such as
going south. "We're doing the booking
for spring break right now with many
people going to Florida," said Lynn
Hutto of Boersma Travel Agency. "The
bookings are coming earlier this year,
though. People are thinking earlier
about spring break."

- -7

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