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January 05, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Paae 8-Friday, January 5, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Faculty re
By LEONARD BERNSTEIN act
University faculty members last month rejected
guidelines that would have regulated the relationship -h
: between University members and intelligence agencies such off
as the CIA. CI
By a 21-13 vote, the faculty Senate Assembly turned down tha
a proposal formulated by the Civil Liberties Board (CLB), on B
grounds that any such document would threaten academic app
freedom. ofw
THE DECISION sends the attempt by University uni
officials to draft a set of principles that would limit the
activities of intelligence agencies on campus. University civ
faculty and students began to push for guidelines last year ofte
after it became known that the CIA was covertly recruiting
and investigating students, without their knowledge, at the som
University of Michigan and at schools across the country. sai
-Since the -disclosures were made, more than 25 schools R
have assessed the need for regulating the on-campus res

jects spy
ivities of intelligence agencies.
Three universities - Harvard, Ohio State, and Syracuse
have passed guidelines. The Harvard document touched
an on-going controversy between that university and the
A, when CIA Director Stansfield Turner stated publicly
t his agency would ignore Harvard's decision.
BUT UNIVERSITY of Michigan faculty members
parently disagreed with their Harvard colleagues because
what they saw as a threat to their rights of free speech and
nhibited research.
"I think the document itself is an infringement on my
il liberties," said English Prof. Eric Rabkin, who led an
en vociferous attack on the proposal.
"Academic freedom, though not protected by law, is
mething which we should seek to protect by practice," 'he
d.
RABKIN SPECIFICALLY objected to the third of four
olutions in the document, which stated that no University

activities guidelines
member should give the name of another University member communitv from."lending their namesand nnsitins to gin

"to any intelligence agency for purpose of possible
recruitment by the intelligence agency without the express
prior consent of that individual."
Rabkin said that the clause, in addition to restricting his'
right to speech, "has the effect of forcing the CIA to lie to us."
Rabkin said that intelligence agency recruiters might pose
as representatives of other organizations in order to get
names of potential employees from professors.
Other faculty members said they felt there was no need
for the document because most of its principles were
embodied in an unwritten academic code of behavior
followed by most professors.
"ONCE YOU TRY TO legislate morality, you spin a very
tangled web," said Chemistry Prof. Philip Elving. "Unless
we are trying to fill some kind of psychological need to
chastise intelligence agencies, I fail to see the point of this
document."
Elving said there is no need for resolutions two and four
of the proposal which barred any members of the University

public acceptance for material they know to be misleading or
untrue," and using "their academic role as a ruse for
obtaining information for intelligence agencies." Elving
called such actions :'common fraud" and said no new rules
are needed to protect against them.'
Rabkin agreed with Elving, saying' that while "all
reasonable men" believe constraints have to be imposed on
their behavior, these constraints should be limited to those
thatsare part of civil law.

a

ENGINEERING PROF. Arch Naylor, a long-time foe of
any guidelines, also objected to the proposal because it
contained "punitive measures" for violations, without
specifically stating what those punishments would be.
Senate Assembly head Shaw Livermore defended the
proposal, which has been reviewed by the Senate Advisory'
Committee for University Affairs (SACUA), the nine-:
member advisory group to the Senate Assembly, and the
administration.

J
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.

SPANISH TERRORISTS ARRESTED FOR GENERAL'S DEATH:

Madrid erupts

with protest

,
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,
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.,
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By UPI, AP, and Reuter
MADRID, Spain-Police yesterday
arrested two suspects accused of the
terrorist slaying of the military gover-
nor of Madrid, the national news agen-
cy EFE reported.
EFE said the suspects were caught in
the province of Avila, north of Madrid,
the home province of Prime Minister
Adolfo Suarez.
SHOUTING FOR the government to
resign and the army take power, angry
rightists burned Basque flags in Madrid
streets yesterday at the funeral of a
Spanish general assassinated by
Basque separatists.
A crowd estimated at 2,000 persons
accompanied the casket of Maj. Gen.
Constantino Ortin Gil, military gover-
nor of Madrid who was gunned down
outside his apartment door 24 hours
earlier by terrorists.
Hundreds of riot police kept the
crowed in order as it shouted demands
for centrist Premier Adolfo Suarez and

Defense Minister Lt. Gen. Manuel
Gutierrez Mellado to resign.
SOME SCUFFLES erupted as
demonstrators shouted "Out with the

cars about 65 miles north of Madrid last
night for questioning in the slaying, but
released four. The names of the three
detained AP said were not released.

'The hands of the government cannot be
stained with the blood of ETA assassins.'
-Spanish Interior Minister
Rodolfo Martin Villa

region in northern Spain.
Government . officials said the
assassination was a clear attempt td
provoke the army into the streets.
Gil's murder has been widely inters
preted as an attempt by the ETA to
provoke the army to intervene against
Spain's young democracy, in the belief
that an army takeover would in turrt:
provoke a popular uprising which the
ETA aspires to lead.
BUT INTERIOR Minister Rodolfr
Martin Villa said on television Wed-
nesday night the government would not,
negotiate with the organization because
"the hands of the government cannot bd
stained with the blood of ETA:
assassins."
Thousands of Madrid workers
yesterday staged one-hour stoppages to
protest the killing, responding to a call
by Spain's major Socialist and Comp
munist-led trade unions.
As a sign of mourning, the army
called off all traditional festivities
planned for today and tomorrow, the
day of the Epiphany.

_'
4

Suarez government!" "The army to
power" and police sharpshooters gazed
down from surrounding downtown
buildings.
Thousands of police and security men
caused traffic jams in parts of Madrid
by erecting roadblocks for car and
identification checks in their manhunt
for the four terrorists who gunned down
Ortin Wednesday.
The Associated Press reported
police arrested seven persons in two

THE BASQUE separatist group ETA,
which took responsibility for the
general's death, announced a general
offensive against the Spanish military.
A magazine reported ETA guerrillas
had gotten their hands on American-
made M-16 automatic rifles and printed
pictures they said proved it.
The general was the 137th victim the
ETA has asserted it has killed in its
campaign for autonomy for the Basque

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Shah takes break, generals quit

.4
too"

)4

(Continued from Page 1'
some senior civilian aides, were also
reported to have strongly urged the
shah to stay in Iran and not to leave
temporarily.
The shah - before leaving Tehran af-
ter weeks of near-seclusion in his
palace to travel to a nearby ski resort
for two days of rest - fulfilled a pledge
made last week and appointed the for-
mer deputy leader of the opposition.
party, Shapur Bakhtiar, as the new
prime minister.
With his 37-year reign threatened by
street violence and widespread
economic disruption, the shah had
asked Bakhtiar to form a civilian gover-
nment in an obvious attempt to appease
anti-shah forces.
BAKHTIAR WAS expected to present
his cabinet to the shah tomorrow, of-
ficials said.
The National Front opposition party
claimed yesterday its leaders had per-
suaded oil workers to resume limited

crude production for domestic consum-
ption, but, a front spokesman said,
"This improvement in the oil situation
may not go to the credit of Bakhtiar."
The spokesman also said the National
Front had called for a day of mourning
Sunday for victims of this week's
shooting by troops.
ALSO, A Carter administration split
over Iran widened yesterday as dif-
ferences became more apparent bet-
ween Carter's national security adviser
Zbigniew Br:inski and State Depar-
tment officials over whether to advise
the shah to leave his country.
State Department officials again
broadly hinted that the U.S. might soon
advise the shah to leave Iran so that a
civilian government could try to restore
order.
But national security adviser
Zbigniew Brzezinski was understood to
be arguing forcefully that it was
presumptuous for the United States to

P H O N E 7 6 9 - 7 94
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give any such advice to the shah or try
to shape a new government in Iran.
THE SOVIET UNION yesterday ac-
cused U.S. agents of trying to kindle an-
ti-Soviet feeling in Iran and discounted
charges of its own intervention in the
country as untrue.
"In an attempt to distract attention
from their interference in that coun-
try's internal affairs, circles irk the
United States are having recourse to
old hackneyed slanders against the
Soviet Union," Tass news agency said.
"... They are trying to lay the blame
at the door of the Soviet Union, alleging
it is fomenting anti-American sen-
timents in Iran.
AVATULLAH KHOMAINI, spiritual
leader of the Iranian uprising, deman-
ded in Paris that the shah and his
family by imprisoned for life.
"That would be the minimum," the
Moslem holy man told AP in an inter-
view.
Until now, Khomaini had demanded
exile for Shah Mohammad Reza
Pahlavi. Asked whether he still insisted
on exile, he replied, "The shah.. . and.
his immediate family are criminals and:
they have to be tried and punished ac-
cording to Islamic laws."
GRAVITY'S CONTRIBUTION
HMMER CITY, Pa. (AP) - Gravity
is helping keep the air clean in this
western Pennsylvania region.
Sulfur is being removed from coal
before it is burned in an electric
generating plant here by a process
using the force of gravity to separate
the two substances. This greatly
reduces emission of sulfur dioxide gas,
which is an air pollutant, from the
plant's smoke stacks, explains William'
G. Kuhns, of General Public Utilities-
Corp. which runs the Homer City plant.
The process, in addition to reducing:
air pollution, will cut tens of millions of
dollars from the cost of building and
operating the generating plant, com
pared to methods now used to remove ;
sulfur from smoke stack gases after the.
coal has been burned, Kuhns says.
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