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December 06, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-06

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Page 2-Thursday, December 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily

I

Id

No W thru December16

6

THAILAND WANTS REFUGEES TO RELOCATE

Cambodian relief aid held back

~~Compee jreu'
0tpodeirOsa
a nAA ; NAM - ----- --- - -- - -- -

11

From AP and Reuter

NON MARK MOON, Thailand (AP)-
The Thai military, in what one officer
described as "subtle" pressure, kept
food and water shipments from
reaching a huge enclave of displaced
Cambodians for a fourth straight day
yesterday, and thousands began to
move farther into Thailand.
U.S. officials said yesterday the
number of Cambodian refugees bun-
ched along the Thai border was swelling
toward the one million mark and there
are fears Vietnamese troops might
stampede all of them into Thailand.
"THERE'S A steady stream of
humanity toward the concentrations on
the border," said Burton Levin, deputy

chief of the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok,
at a Congressional hearing.
"The reason is very simple. The food
(sent to Cambodia by international
relief agencies) is not getting to the
people in Cambodia. So they are
moving to where the food is."
Levin said officials estimate 3,000 to
5,000 new refugees are arriving daily at
the border camps, where steady sup-
plies of food and medicines are arriving
by truck.
"PEOPLE ARE now talking, about as
many as one million crowding into that
area," he said.
Levin estimated there were up to
600,000 refugees massed along'the bor-
der, with Thailand unable to absorb

Israel frees Palestinian
mayor after 25 days

,them-about 500,000 politically neutral
people concentrated north of the town
of Aranyaprathet, and 50,000 to 100,000
supporters of the ousted Pol Pot gover-
nment to the south.
THE GOVERNMENT last Sunday
began barring relief supplies from the
area in an effort to force some 200,000 of
the Cambodians to move to the Khao I
Dang camp, seven miles from the
Cambodian border and farther from
potential fighting zones.
Leaders of the Free Khmer anti-
communist guerrillas who control Non
Mark Moon are resisting the move.
The government said it also acted
because Free Khmer guerrillas were
diverting supplies for their own use.
BORDER AUTHORITIES said 4,000
refugees had moved since Sunday, but
camp leaders said 12 persons had died
because no doctors were allowed in to
treat them.
Relief officials said they were trying
to persuade the Thai government to lift
the blockade.
Prince Norodom Soriavong, leader of
an estimated 250,000 of the camp
residents, denied he was preventing the
throngs from leaving this site, about 150f
miles east of Bangkok.
SORIAVONG, WHO claims to be a
cousin of Cambodia's former head of
state, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, said
he has cabled the prince to lead his
people, including 6,000 armed
guerrillas, in their struggle against the
Vietnamese troops who occupy Cam-
bodia and the regime they have
established.'

Guerrillas of ousted Communist
Premier Poi Pot also are fighting the
new Phnom Penh government.
A military source at the border said
the government would continue the
suspension of supplies for an indefinite
period because it was the "most subtle"
way to force the Cambodians into
moving into safer areas inside
Thailand, and to ensure that relief sup-
plies will be distributed to the civilians.
THOMAS BARNES, director of the
State Department's Cambodia Working
Group, testified that international relief
supplies still were not being effectively
distributed inside Cambodia despite the
Phnom Penh government's statements
to the contrary.
He said international relief officials
had confirmed that food and medical
supplies were piling up at Cambodian
ports, although he could supply no,
figures on the reported backlog.
Asked about allegations the Cam-
bodian government was deliberately
following a starvation policy, at Viet-
namese instigation, Barnes replied,
"I'm not going to say this is a policy of
genocide."
But he added: "We do know there are
specific instances where rice fields
have ben mined, where people have
been shot for going into the fields to
gather harvests."
Richard Walden, head of a private
U.S. famine relief effort that delivered
40 tons of supplies to Phnom Penh last
month, said he had seen no evidence the
Cambodians were deliberately holding.
up aid distribution.

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(Continued from Page 1)
won in its long battles against oc-
cupation for the achievement of its
legitimate rights to self-determination
and statehood."
Fears of a widespread eruption of
West Bank violence were behind inter-
national appeals to Israel. The United
States and Egypt had urged the depor-
tation be rescinded, and both the U.N.
Security Council and General Assembly
passed resolutions supporting Shakaa.
The decision eased nearly a month of
tension in the Israeli-occupied West
Bank and Gaza Strip, where 29 mayors
and many town council members
resigned in protest and general strikes
were held.
BOTH THE UNITED States and
Egypt on Wednesday called the rever-
sal a "positive step" that could give
new impetus to the talks on
Palestinians' autonomy in the West
Bank and Gaza and bring stability to
the occupied region.
While no official charges were
publicly brought against Shakaa, leaks
from government officials portrayed
the mayor as a leader of organized
resistance to Israeli rule.
The original plan was to deport him to
an unspecified Arab nation. Shakaa had
said that if deported he wanted to go to
Jordan.
Israel's West Bank military gover-
nor, Brig. Gen. Binyamin Ben-Eliezer,
summoned reporters to his headquar-
ters and said he had decided, after con-'
sulting with Defense Minister Ezer

Weizman, to reverse the deportation
order.
BEN-ELIEZER SAID a military ap-
peals board still felt the expulsion order
had been "substantiated" by evidence
heard in secret, but he had considered
"the welfare of the city of Nablus and of
Shakaa's family."
The general said he warned Shakaa
to confine himself strictly to municipal
affairs.
After arriving here, Shakaa told his
supporters: "All the words attributed
to me were twisted and distorted, and
all the measures taken against me were
unjust.. . I object to violence on the
Israeli or Palestinian side.
"AS LONG AS there is an occupation
you can expect violence. Objectively,
all circumstances on the West Bank
may encourage violence."

Smokers insurrection' forces

airline pilot to mak

NEW YORK (AP) - It was a
variation on "Three Little Pigs" at
15,000 feet. When the non-smoker
huffed and the smokers puffed, the
pilot brought their plane down.
Capt. Larry Kinsey was piloting
Eastern Flight 1410 yesterday mor-
ning when "an insurrection" in-
volving smokers and non-smokers
led him to land the Washington-to-
New York 8 a.m. shuttle at
Baltimore-Washington International
Airport in Linthicum, Md.
SOME OF THE 177 passengers
canceled out in Maryland, but the
rest were put aboard a different
plane with a new crew, arriving at
LaGuardia Airport nearly three
hours late.
The problem: A non-smoker
seated in the smoking section of the
filled Boeing 727 demanded his area
be made non-smoking. When it was,
the adjacent passengers - who
thought they were still in a smoking
area - lit up.
At that point, just about everyone
got fired up.
EASTERN spokesman Gil
Perlroth said the non-smoker was
first offered a seat on the next flight.

When he turned down that offer, and
a call for a volunteer to change seats
went unanswered, the non-smoking
section was expanded. The Civil
Aeronautics Board says airlines
must provide enough seats in a non-
smoking section to accommodate all
non-smokers.
Then, Perlroth added, the neigh-
boring passengers refused to obey
the pilot's order to stop smoking.
"I'll show you how it's done," a
senior flight attendant quoted the
non-smoker, identified as Richard
Lent, a Washington, D.C., tax
lawyer, as saying to his companions
just before the ruckus started.
IN A TELEPHONE interview,
Lent denied making the comment,
saying all he "wanted was a non-
smoking seat. Once I got that, I was
out of it. The rest of what happened
didn't involve me."
He also denied having demanded
that smokers near him stop, adding
that he had not threatened legal ac-
tion. He acknowledged threatening
to complain to the CAB.
"It was silly and childish," said
Emory Kristof, a passenger from
Washington. "I haven't seen a

landing
display like this since kindergarten.
We had to land the plane and sort out
everybody's dollies and metal toys."
Kristof quoted the pilot as saying
if the situation remained unstable,
he would land the plane at the
nearest airport.
Passenger Harry Fisdell,
executive vice president of the New
York Newspaper Guild, said the
dispute began when Lent demanded
that everyone near him stop
smoking.
THEN, FISDELL said, "The pilot
came on and said: "Those in the
smoking section, smoke.'
Fisdell said he and others con-
tinued to smoke while Lent con-
tinued to "raise hell."
Fisdell said Kinsey then announ-
ced: " 'I'm telling you people, this
insurrection has to stop, or I'm going
to land the plane.' "
Two minutes later, the pilot comes
over again and says, 'Well, the in-
surrection hasn't stopped. I'm lan-
ding.' "And he did.
The airline said it had no plans to
press charges against any of the
quarreling passengers.

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CONTACT LENSES
soft and hard* contact lenses $210.00
includes exam, fitting, dispensing, follow-up visits,
starter kits, and 6 month checkup.
* inciudes a second pair of hard lenses
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769-1222 by appointment
__________________

Daily Official Bulletin
Thursday, December 6. 1979
Daily Calendar
Center for Japanese Studies: Luiz Gomez/T. Grif-
fith Foulk, "How American Are Zen Centers in
America?", noon; Royal] Tyler. "The Forked Staff
of the Mountain God: Biopolr Field Displays in the
Japanese Imagination," Lane Commons, 4 p.m.
Career Planning and Placement: Gerald Lundy,
"Career Seminars for Graduate Students in the
Humanities Who Are Interested in Non-Academic
Alternatives," E. Conf., Rackham, 3 p.m.
Guild House: Poetry readings, Toledo Poets, Joel
Lipman, Nick Muska, Bob Phillips, 802 Monroe, 7:30
p.m._
Chemistry: Dimitri N. Coucouvanis, U-Iowa,
"Simple Metal Mercaptide Complexes: Structural
Properties and Their Use in the Synthesis of
Metalloprotein Active Site Analogues," 1200 Chem.,.8
p.m.

STAR

BAR

109 N. Main St.--61-0109
APPEARING TONIGHT: FROM DETROIT
PROGRESSIVE BLUES BAND
"Ann Arbor's original Honky Tank Dance Bar"
- 1

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
OF JERUSALEM
1980/81 PROGRAMS FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS

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r (USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 75
Thursday, December 6,1919
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