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September 06, 1979 - Image 111

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 6, 1979-Page F-11
USED FOR STUD YAND SOCIALIZING:
Libraries dot campus

(Continued from Page 10)
THE AVAILABILITY of, reserve
readings "really depends on how many
books the professor puts out, how many
people have to do the reading, and how
long they wait to do the reading," said
Aileen Murray, a student assistant at
the library. .
The UGLI and the Grad both have
elaborate electronic detectors at their
exits, which makes it virtually im-
possible to leave the buildings with
library materials that have not been
checked out. Librarians report nab-
bing "a couple of people a day" trying
to escape with unchecked library
materials.
If a book is returned to most campus
libraries by the third day it's overdue,
no fine will be assessed. But the fourth
day brings a fine of $1 per book, with an
additional 25Q fine for each day thereaf-
ter.
ONE LIBRARIAN said a grace

period of a month is usually allowed
before a hold credit is placed on a
student, which makes virtually any of-
ficial University transaction im-
possible. UGLI records list an average
of 3,000 hold credits at any given time,
with almost 2,000 books being turned in
late each term.
Professors, unlike students, are not
charged overdue fines until the book is
eight weeks late, at which time they are
assessed $1.25 per book.
There are many libraries besides the
UGLI and the Grad which are available
to undergraduate students. The
.majestic Law Library is located in the
ivy-league-style law quad. Long tables
and walls adorned with intricately car-
ved woodwork create an atmosphere
unlike that of any other campus library.
SEVERAL medical libraries provide
modern comfort, among them the Den-
tistry Library, the Medical Center
Library, and the Public Health Library.

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ

Many students prefer to find an empty
classroom in the Public Health Building
across from the Markley residence
hall during finals, while others prefer
the comforts of the reading room of the
Modern Languages Building.
Many libraries serve a dual pur-
pose-as research tools and as displays
of special works or collections. The
Clements Library, decorated in a plush,
antiquated style, - offers rare books
dealing with America's history from
the late 15th Century through the Civil
War. The special library attracts
mainly graduate students from all over
the country.
The, Museums Library contains
exhibits on different living creatures,
the Fine Arts Library a special collec-
tion on Asian Art, and the Music
Library a collection of American
Popular Music.
Other campus libraries include Ar-
chitecture Library, the Bureau of
Government Library, the Chemistry-
Pharmacy Library, the North
Engineering Library, a Mathematics
Library, Michigan Historical Collec-
tions, a Natural Science-Natural
Resources Library, a Physics-
Astronomy Library, and a Social Work
Library.
Run out of places to study? Try your
dorm library.
J1ook~'bop
" Largest Selection in
the Midwest - Over
50,000 Titles in Stock
" 10% Discount on Most
Hardcovers
" Largest Selection of
Publishers' Remainders
" Art Gallery & Custom.
Framing
303 SOUTH STATE STREET
ANN ARBOR
668-7652

Doily Photo by JIM KRUZ

r

INTERESTED IN:

-I

* Newspapers * Magazines * Radio * Tele-
vision 9 Communications Teaching * Public
Relations " Publicity * Photojournalism
SAdvertising If so, then JOIN:

II omen 19nicatuons.

COME to our first meeting on:
Wednesday, Sept. 19 at 7 PM
KKuenzel Room~, Michigan Union

Daily Photo CYRENA CHANG
LIBRARIES DOT THE University campus. Some, such as the Clements Library (top), are used primarily for research,
while others also serve as a quiet haven for students searching for a place to study. The Graduate Library, one of the most
popular on canpus, features its own "wlid tunnel" (right) under the stacks. The newest campus library, named in
honor of former President Gerald Ford, will be opening soon.

e~ s
The ABCs
of: making.
thegrade
(Continued from Page 1)
ded that GPAs may also have begun to
"turn back down."
EDUCATORS generally attribute the
spiraling GPAs to an increased desire
among undergraduates to gain ad-
mission to graduate and professional
schools. But University Graduate
School Dean Alfred Sussman cautioned
- that graduate school admissions are
based on a "complex equation" in
whichgrades are only a part. He says
"graduate admissions officers also
evaluate letters of recommendation,
standardized test scores, and previous
field experience when considering ap-
plicants.
On the other end of, the grade spec-
trum, however, are students who for
one reason or another do not enjoy the
healthy GPAs of the majority. In LSA,
-the school which admits the bulk of fir-
t-year students, a 2.0 term grade point
:,i ust be earned if the student is to
&main in good academic standing. If
=tie average for a term slips below that
:mark, the student is placed on
-probation and must raise his or her
term average above the C level during
?be next term or face dismissal. Ap-
:proximately 500 students will be placed
-On probation for their performances
during winter term 1979 and an
-estimated 150 of that number even-
tually will be dismissed.
ANOTHER 200 LSA students will face
- :-n even more dismal academic future
:than probation after being classified

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