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November 17, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-17

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IntroductoryDiscussions on the
Sak 'i Faith Eery &vening
Sun., Nov. 4 thru Wed., Nov. 21
Rob# Center, 512 Packard St.
7:30 P.M.

Page 2-Saturday, November 17, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Ames praises new A2 administrator

Notice To Students Interested
In Romance Languages
Because of a sequence-key error
in the printing of the
WINTER TIME SCHEDULE,
four Spanish courses have been
printed under the heading
SERBO-CROATION on page 77.
They are:
484-421 Spanish Mind, 18th cenfury to Present
484-425 Romanticism
484-470 The Comedia
484-482 Picaresque Novel
Please consult page 77 for the
correct meeting times.

(Continued from Page 1)
council usually follows his advice.
Before making his proposals, he con-
sults closely with the heads of the city
departments on all aspects of a plan,
Fellinger said.
While Sprenkel offered no concrete
plans for this city, he applied his ex-
perience as manager in Ames to what
he has learned of Ann Arbor.
Sprenkel said he runs the Ames' ad-
ministration according to a "team
management system." By "bringing
together all of the potentially involved
departments," to discuss a new
proposal "everyone knows what their
role is," Sprenkel said.
THAT SYSTEM was lauded by Ames
officials. Personnel department head
Ron Adams said Sprenkel encouraged
open communication. When union con-
tracts are being discussed, the
negotiating team includes represen-

tatives from three departments and the
city manager's office Adams ex-
plained.
Ames Councilman Dean Houston said
Sprenkel is good at handling'the public
and is "pen to council at all times."
The 23 neighborhood associations in
Ames are active in city government
and Sprenkel said he meets with many
citizens. "I maintain an open door
policy," he said.
ALTHOUGH AMES council is non-
partisan, Sprenkel said he doesn't an-
ticipate any problems working with
Ann Arbor's bipartisan council.
Sprenkel claims he encountered "every
conceivable combination" of party
politics while city ianager of South
Windsor, Connecticut between 1962 and
1976.
The 45-year-old Sprenkel emphasized
the importance of recognizing the
political system, but said his choices of

alternatives have to be based on
apolitical "professional" judgments.
Upon arriving in Ann Arbor, one of
Sprenkel's first projects will be to
develop a solid waste management
plan. Last week council, led by a
unanimous Republican majority, voted
to suspend all work on a voter approved
refuse shredding project until more
feasibility studies can be completed.
COUNCIL MEMBERS advocated
delaying plans until Sprenkel, who is
considered an expert in solid waste and
resource recovery systems, takes of-
fice. Ames has a shredding facility
complete with a refuse derived fuel
(RDF) system.
Another similarity between Ann Ar-
bor and Ames is the importance of
University-city relations. The
association of Ames and Iowa State
University, is "a model of University-
community relationships," Sprenkel

said. He said city and University of-
ficials meet periodically and cooperate
on recreation, fire department and
street repair projects.
Like their Ann Arbor counterparts
many students live in off-campus rental
housing. Several years ago, a "Rental
Housing Code" was instituted in Ames
which requires that rental housing units
be inspected annually. Landlords also,
must qualify for a "letter of complian-,
ce," Sprenkel said. "It has, par-
ticularly in some of the older sections,
(of Ames) ... improved the housing
stock," he added.
The most difficult part of his job,
Sprenkel said, "depends on the problem
of the day." The manager, he said,
must be accessible, to officials and
citizens, and willing to "stand up and be
counted" when making recommen-
dations.

Ufer, Bo highlight pep rally at Mudbowl

(Continued from Page 1)
director George Cavender, city coun-
cilman David Fisher, who played on the
1964 Rose Bowl team, Coach Bo Schem-
bechler, and "Mr. Meeechigan" Bob
Ufer.
A grinning Schembechler yelled, "I

guarantee you we're ready to play. You
people will make the difference out
there!"
Then Ufer, clad in a yellow shirt with
a Michigan tie, stood bathed in the
white spotlights'on the makeshift stage.
The chilled crowd went into a frenzy
while Ufer recalled past Michigan-Ohio
State contests.
"This is a great year, the centennial

year of Michigan football," the radio'
voice of Michigan football exclaimed.
"I don't believe Purdue and Notre
Dame beat us. We beat ourselves.
There'll be no giveaway tomorrow."
He finished by launching into his
famous Michigan-Ohio State eulogy.
Everybody seemed hyped for the
game. "Great turnout. Best turnout
we've ever had here," commented

cheerleader Robert Fichman.
Michigan Band - director Glenni
Richter echoed Fichman's observation:
"Tremendous pep rally," said Richter,
who was attending his first pep rally
at the University. He predicted a 21-0
Michigan victory.
A Columbus, Ohio resident, Phil
Kramer, said, "I came from Columbus
to watch OSU score a touchdown."

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Regents approve salary release
(Continued from Page1)

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?" What Is the cause?
They want to "break the bands - cast away the cords," and
get rid of the restraint, the fences, the road blocks the
Almighty has thrown across our paths to hold us back and
keep us from damning ourselves, our children, and our
posterity in time and eternity. In other words their rage is
against God's Ten Commandments, God's moral lawl
Next we are told the consequences of this rebellious
raging: "He that sitteth In the heavens shall laugh. The Lord
shall have them In derision; then shall H e speak unto them in
rHis wrath, and vex them in HIs sore displeasure."
The English historian, Terry, standing on the high ground
of his vast and Intimate knowledge of the English people, and
looking at their experiences across the centuries said: "THE
LAPSE OF CHURCH DISCIPLINE WAS A CERTAIN
SYMPTOM OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL ANARCHYI"
Generally speaking, our churches have just about
"junked" disciplinelSeem to think It "un-christian" in spite of
the fact thatGod says; "JUDGEMENT MUST BEGIN AT THE
HOUSE OF GOD!" The devil himself can join most any of our
churches, provided he dresses decently and tells a big
profane lie - which is no hindrance to him of whom Christ
said was "the father of lies and a murderer from the begin-
'ningi" Someone has said that the best of us in the churches
are so dirty and weak that we have not the inclination nor the

* strength to bathe the balance! Things get mighty bad and
offensive when people quit bathing! Soon smell worse than
goats! And the goats were put on the "left hand" in the
judgement scene in the 25th of Matthew! Are you a "leftist?" I
want to be on "the extreme right" in that dayf
Are we not, or most of us, guilty of double talk and
hypocrisy when we piously repeat God's Commandments
and then show very little concern or zeal to obey? We say
"Remember the Sabbath Day to keep it holy," acknowledge it
to be God's Commandment, and then go out to do as we
please, whether to buy, sell, frolic, play, and make it an
"unholy holiday!" O ut of one side of our mouth we repeat the
others: Honor father and mother, do not kill, do not commit
adultery, don't steal, don't bear false witness, thou shalt not
covet anything that is thy neighbors, acknowledging them to
be the Commandments of God Almighty, and then out of the
other side of our mouth, by our actions, we say the contrary,
"cast away the Law of the Lord" if it gets in our way, or else
are indiffferent to their violations and profanation even by
our church people, much less in civil life!
O ur trouble, the world's trouble, is that we have a currupt
form of Christianityl A Christianity that has been shoved off
its base, off its foundation: "THE LAW OF GOD." The first
recorded words of Christ after His baptism were; "Man shall
not live by bread alone, but by "EVERY WORD" that
proceedeth out of the mouth of God." Matthew and L uke 4:4.

less competitive with other major in-
stitutions. It is something by and large
the faculty does not want." He also said
he found it difficult to reconcile this
idea with the concept of the University
retaining its autonomy from the state.
"I don't think the legislature has
solved a problem. It's creating a
problem," Regent Thomas Roach (D-
Saline) said.
Smith said the issue of salary
disclosure was "essentially media-
generated" and said he felt the public
really had no strong desire to know the
faculty's salary.
SMITH SAID the form in which the
salaries will be released has not been

finalized. "The implementation is left
to the administration," he said.
Smith said the information would
probably include information by title,
department, appointment rate (what
professors' would receive on a full-time
basis, even if they do not teach full-
time), the actual salary figure, length
of appointment, and the source of
salary funds, along 'with other
statistical information on each faculty
member.
The University has received two
requests for salary lists-one from the
Detroit Free Press, and another from
the Michigan Daily.
The action came as a result of an

amendment to the state's Freedom of
Information Act, requiring that
salaries of employees and officials a
public institutions of higher education
be made public upon request. The act,
sponsored by state Sen. Jerome Hart
(D-Saginaw), was signed into law by
Lt. Gov. James Brickley Oct. 26.
The old University bylaw provided in-
formation to the public including salary
figures by department and job title, but
did not list individual faculty members
by name. The University has continued
that the release of name-linked salary
figures is an invasion of privacy.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 63
Saturday, November 17, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
May-nard-Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published' Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbon;; $7.0 by mail ot
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
p aid at Ann Arbor,; i ichigan. POST-.
MASTER:nSend address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

P.O. BOX 405 DECATUR, GEORGIA 30031

Concierto de Musica Latinoamericana
con el grupo
ALBORADA yotras
Canciones de Chile, Mexico, Cuba, Argentina y Venezuela
Benefit for Nicaraguan Aid
attheARK, 1421 Hill St.
Sunday, November 18, 8:30 pm

I flu11Q
Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
r- ---..---- WRITE YOUR AD HERE! ------------
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Words 1 2 3 4 5 add.
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15-21 2.55 5.10 6.90 8.70 10.50 1.50 where this ad
:1 2-35 4.2 8.0 1.5014.0 1.50 2.5 to rIn
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- AA,.:1 .,A:si.-kn *-",. Classifieds, The Michigan Daily

Church Worship ervices
~P

EMMANUEL. BAPTIST CHURCH
727 Miller Rd.
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Thomas Loper, 663-7306.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560'
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ave.
Fellowship Supported by the
Christian Reformed Church
Clay Libolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
Speaker: Rev. John Steigenga.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtena w Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00Fa.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a. m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT
E piscopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
.T C: A- Xr l -./"fi-- _ _

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Divisioni
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a. m
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
NEWPORT FELLOWSHIP
(Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Road-665-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship--11:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning, Pastor. 663-9526
* * *
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
809 Henry St.
668-611:1 ;
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
IA)RD OF LIGH T LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-
tice.
* * * '
CIURCHI OFCHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
33i Th m n -Bnn._-01. 7

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CHURCH; SBC
2580 Packard Road
971-0773
Michael Clingenpeel, Ph.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:45, Sunday School; 11:00,
Morning Worship.
Student Transportation call 662-6253
or 764-5240.
6:00 p.m.-Student supper; 7 p.m.
Worship.
Wednesday, 6 p.m.-Dinner and
Church family activities.
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division )-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Pilgrims." The Rev. Terry Ging
speaking.
11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
5:30 p.m.-Sunday Family Night Sup-
pers, Fellowship Hall. Students Wel-
come As Our Guests.
Wednesday Campus Discussion
Group cancelled this week.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *

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