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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 06, 1979 - Image 109

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

5. U. of California,
Berkeley........
6. Stanford U..........
7. Princeton U. .........
8. U. of Michigan..... .
9. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison ............

400%
29%
23%
12%
10%

1%
1%

One of the
5 Best T

1

1 Harvard U.....
2. U. of California,
Berkeley . ...
3. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison..
4. Stanford U.........
5. Yale U...........
6 U. of Michigan .. .....
7.-Massachusetts Institute
of Technology.....
8. Cornell U. ...........

One of the
5 Best
54%
33%

The Best
24%
10%

1% 1. YaleU............
0% 2. Harvard U......
3. U. of California,
1% Berkeley..........
4. U. of Chicago ..-"-" .
5. Princeton U..........
6. Stanford U. ..........
7. U. of Virginia ........
8. Johns Hopkins U. ....
9. Columbia U. .........
10. U. of Michigan .......
e Best 11. U. of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill .........

79%
70%
64%
37%
27%
19%
19%
18%
14%
13%
10%

the Best 5. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison ...........
52% 6. U. of Michigan ...... .
20% 7. Stanford U. ..........
8. U. of Chicago.......
6% 9. Columbia U. ..........
3% 10. Johns Hopkins U. ... .

32%
29%
23%
22%
22%
12%

2%
2%
2%
5%
1%
1%

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 6, 1979-Page F-9
The 'U' ranks

1%
2%
1%
1%
1%
0%
0%

with the best

N

31%
30%
19%
19%
18%
14%

6%
11%
2%
1%

Oneo the
5 Best The

One of the
5 Best The Best

By ADRIENNE LYONS

1. Stanford U.........
2Harvard U.
a. U. of Chicago .. .
+ U. of Pennsylvania.
$= NorthwesternlU. .....
6. U. of Illinois Urbana
7. U. of Texas, Austin ...
8 Massachusetts Institute
of Technology ......
9. U. of California,
B Berkeley..........
16'. U. of Michigan......
1i U. of California,
Los Angeles...... .
12. Columbia U... .
11 Michigan State U. ....

One of the,
5 Best Th
67%
47%
35%
32%.
25%
25%
23%/

1. Stanford U.........
6% 2. Ohio State U. ........
5% 3. Indiana U. ...........
4. U. of Illinois, Urbana
5. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison ............
6. Harvard U. ..........
7. U. of Chicago .......
e Best 8. Columbia U. .........
28% 9. U. of California,
21 % Los Angeles ........
6% 10. U. of California,
4% .Berkeley.....
10% 11. U. of Michigan......
12. Michigan State U.
3%

32% 110
31% 9%
25% 6%
23% 6%
23% 4%
20% 8%
20% 4%
18% 3%

12nO 1

One of the
5 Best T

1. Yale U.-............ ..
2. Harvard U. ..........
3. U. of Chicago.......
4. Stanford U.........
5. U. of Michigan......
6. Columbia U. .........
7. U. of California,
he Best Berkeley ......". . ..
21% ' 8. U. of Pennsylvania ...

92%
89%
57%.
46%
43%
24%
11%

I v io

17%
14%
12%
12%

1. Yale U............
4% 2. U. of California,
Berkeley..........
2% 3. Harvard U.
3% 4. U. of Wisconsin,
2% Madison ..........
5. Prince' U. .......
6. U. of lexas, Austin ...
7. Columbia U........
8. Indiana U. ..........
he Best 9. U. of Michigan......
10. U. of North Carolina,
32% Chapel Hill........
14% 11.StanfordU.........
% 12. U. of Pennsylvania ...
Qoi 13. U. of Illinois, Urbana

48%
46%
43%
32%
28%
28%
24%
22%
22%
21%
21%
13%
12%

20%
20%
17%
15%
10%
10%

3%
2%
1 %
1%
1%
1%

10%
17%
5%
10%
4%
7%
1%
1%
20%
1%
0%
1%

One of the
5BeatT

One of the
5 Best T

1. Massachusetts Institute
of Technology...
2. Stanford U. .........
3. U. of California,
Berkeley ..........
4. U. of Illinois, Urbana,
5. U. of Michigan......
6. California Institute
of Technology......
7. Purdue U. ......... .
8. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison............

63%
57%
56%
44%
25%
23%
20%
1.4%/

10%
3%
4%
2%
4%/

4

1. U. of California,
Berkeley .."........
2. Princeton U. .........
3. Harvard U.........
4. Stanford A) .........
5. U. of Chicago. .
6. Massachusetts Instiute
of Techrnology ......
7. U. of Wisconsin,
Madison... ....
8. U. of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill ..... . .
9. U. of Michigan .......
10. Yale Ui............
11. U. of Illinois, Urbana

65%
55%
51%
44%
44%
40%
20%
16%
14%
14%
1 2%/

14% Move over, Harvard.
61% All right, so maybe the University of
8% Michigan isn't the top-ranking college
j3 in the country, but many polls, both
3% recent and not so recent, have con-,
0% sistently placed the University among
3% the nation's best schools.
Most of the surveys produced are
compiled by sociologists at major
universities across the country. The
researchers usually send question-
naires to deans and faculty in various
specialties, asking them to rate dif-
ferent departments in their fields.
rhe Besi For instance, in a survey published in
the Chronicle of Higher Education last
20% January, social scientists Everett Ladd
22% and Seymour Lipset reported that the
13% University ranks fourth overall among
11%/
6% U.S. colleges. The study, which in-
volved questioning more than 4,000
6% faculty members in four-year colleges,
3% examined 19 academic departments
among those schools. Fifteen University
2% departments ranked in the top 11 in
0% their respective categories.
1% A 1974 SURVEY taken among deans
of U.S. professional schools ranked the
0 five most outstanding professional
schools in each of 17 fields. The survey,
is being completed by sociologists Peter Blau
sl of gand Rebecca Margulies, ranked the
ncle of Dental School and the public health
school first in their respective fields.
The library science school and social

work school were each tied for second
and the School of Music and the Law
School ranked third in the nation.
Surprisingly absent from the top of
each list was the Medical School.
Traditionally ranked as 'one of the
leading medical schools in the country,
the school has fallen in recent years.
Many allege the drop in the ranks is due
mainly to the deteriorating condition of
University Hospital.
"The facilities are obsolete," said
Vice President for University Relations
and Development Michael Radock. He
added that when researchers and scien-
tists are not attracted to the University,
the school's reputation is affected. The
Medical School does still remain fairly
high in the ratings, however, according
to University officials.
RATINGS COMPRISE a valuable
source of information to corporate
recruiters, who come to universities to
offer both graduates and un-
dergraduates jobs, according to
Virginia Stegath, communications
coordinator for the Career Planning
and Placement Office.
"Among the Midwest institutions, we
do better than a lot of schools," Stegath
said. "We fare very well with'
recruiters."
University officials say most of the
surveys fairly accurately reflect the
University's position compared to other
academic institutions.

One of the
s Best The Best

Harvard U . . . . . . . 89% 39% 9. Cornell U. 12% 4%
a. Massachusetts Institute
of Technology....... % ENGLISH
i; U. of Chicago .........86% 14% --
4. Yale U.............. 55% 3%
EVERETT LADD AND Seymour Lipset conducted a survey anong faculty mem-
bers nationwide in 1977 in which various academic departments were rated. In
thiabove chart, the first column includes all departments that were rated among
th(4irst five nationally by at least 10 per cent of the respondents. The second
"Faculty nea

One of the
5 Best
.... . 82%
... ... .. 70%

1. Harvard U.
2. Yale U. .

The Best
45%
20%

3. U. of California,
Berkeley ...........
4. Princeton U. .........

59%
40%

7%
3%

Chart continues on Page 10

column indicates the percentage of respondents listing the department a
the "best" in the nation. This chart was originally published in the Chro
Higher Education last January 15. (Reproduced with permission)

r top in many departments

(Continued from Page 1)
Competitive salaries. The Univer-
sity must present a pay-scale com-
parable to that of other leading in-
stitutions. "High salaries can't buy
quality," Shapiro said, "but high
quality costs.a let."
SOME FACULTY members and ad-
ministrators also mentioned the lure of
the Ann Arbor community itself. "The
city offers a lot culturally and'
socially," Political Science Depar-
tment Chairman Samuel Barnes said.
Barnes also stressed the significance
of faculty salary levels. "Certainly we
don't have the highest paid professors
in the country, but it's very important
we maintain competitive as far as
salaries are concerned," he said.
The following list divides the instruc-
tional staff at the University into five

basic categories, with the average
salary for each position as of the 1978-79
school year.
" Professors-$31,147. ,
" Associate Professors-$22,50.
" Assistant Professors-$17,548.
*Instructors-$14,224.
* Lecturers-$14,432.,
IT SHOULD be noted that there are
great differences 'in pay between many
of the colleges, schools, and depart-
ments at the University. For instance,
the average salary for a full professor
in the School of Nursing is only $24;297,
professors in the School of Dentistry
receive, on the average, a salary of
$49,434.
In relation to other universities in the
country, University of Michigan's pay-
scale ranks near the top of all publicly

sponsored post-secondary institutions.
However, some private universities,
such as Harvard University and Stan-
ford University, pay their full
professors between $2,000 and $5,000
more than their University counterpar-
ts receive. }
"CERTAINLY IT is a disadvantage
to have lower faculty salaries than
some private schools, and we have
significant problems in that area,"
Shapiro said. "There is always
some danger that we won't be able to
continue to offer competitive salaries."
But some faculty members said the
salary situation is a good one and that
other factors are more important in
luring good professors to the Univer-
sity.
MUSIC SCHOOL Dean Allen Britton

said the reputation of the school itself is
an overriding factor in recruiting good
teachers.
"We feel we have the finest music
school in the world. We hire the best
there is-those with the best
reputations in teaching," said Britton.
"But money or no money, you can't get
good faculty without good students."
Once at the University, faculty mem-
bers establish reputations in their
field primarily through research and
activity in professional organizations.
"PROFESSORS here are expected to
contribute to the creation of knowledge
and to establish original, innovative
research," Barnes said. "Only people
at the frontiers of knowledge can be
good teachers."
"The~ only way to acquire a

reputation is through writing books, in-
volvements in associations, and
through original research," Barnes
said.
"RESEARCH IS extremely impor-
tant in sociology and we have some of
the finest reseachers in the country,"
said Sociology Department Chairman
Reynolds Farley. "Prof. Charles Tilly
has a large reputation in work on
special organizations and Prof. Robert
Cole has done some excellent research
on Japan."
While a great number of faculty
members received degrees from the
University, many are "recruited" from
other leading institutions in the coun-
try. The Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, University of California
(Berkeley), Harvard University, and
Yale University, are some of the

schools from which many University
faculty members have received
degrees.
But some students at the University
complain that lower level cour-
ses-those aimed primarily at fresh-
persons and sophomores-are often
poorly taught, even though the
'professors may be highly rated in their
fields.
"r ACTUALLY think the math and
physics teachers I had at first were
pretty lousy," said engineering senior
Todd Mapes.
Valerie Farnan, an LSA senior
majoring in mathematics, agreed with'
Mapes.
"But I'd say in general, they
(University faculty) are as good as they
are rated," said Farnan.

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