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November 13, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Rights of 18-20s
confuse bar owners

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 13, 1979-Page 7

(Continued from Page 1)
restricted as to what area of the
establishment he or she sits in, in-
cluding the bar, according to the terms
of the 1976 Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights
Act.
Some owners and managers,
however, said they feel that the only
way to ensure that minors aren't served
alcohol is to refuse to admit them or to
restrict the areas in which they can sit.
"THEY (THE 18-20 year olds) don't
realize what I'm going to lose," said the
owner of Toni's Apartment, who asked
that her name not be used. "I have a
liquor license that I have to protect."
Assistant State Attorney General
A.C. Stoddard said the LCC has no
specific authority to require the liquor-
serving establishments to inform the
public of its legal rights of access, so
the dilemma "is a matter of civil
Group wants
to lowvsuer
-* "
Mic higan
drinkinga age
(Continued from Page 1)
ACCORDING TO the report, dor-
mitory students are less willing to be
counseled by their resident advisors
because they are seen more as adver-
saries than advisors.
The group's report also asserted that
a problem arises in the selling of
alcoholic beverages in bars because the
Michigan Civil Rights Act protects the
admission of 18-20 year olds into the
establishments although they are
'denied the right to drink.
The report said not enough voluntary
compliance with the law exists, nor is
there substantial interest by enfor-
cement agencies and the general public
in enforcing the law.
NIP

rights."
ANN ARBOR Police Chief Walter
Krasny said the department has
received no complaints from 18-20 year-
olds who have been refused admittance
to local bars.
Although Stoddard said he has heard
of "up to 25" complaints, there has been
no court case yet' because "in every
case in which the bar owner has denied
admittance," to a person who sub-
sequently complained to the civil rights
office, the owner later changed his
policy.
Graduate student Ruth Nowicki, who
filed a complaint in May with the Civil
Rights Department against the
Bananas Disco on Jackson Road,
disagreed. She said a spokesperson for
the department told her "it would all be
handled," but that nothing happened.
SHE SAID "all they (officials of the
Civil Rights Department) did was
notify (the management) that a com-
plaint had been filed." She claimed that
the only result of her complaint was
that, because of the publicity, "more
people have complained.
However, Bananas now admits
everyone over 18, although a
spokesman said the new policy was
"not really" a result of Nowicki's com-
plaint.
Elaine Wright, night manager of the
Blind Pig, said the bar has had com-
plaints about its policy of not admitting
anyone under 21 after 9 p.m., but "ac-
cording to the (LCC) it is up to the
owner to determine" his or her own
policy.
Tom Urquhart, manager of Paul
Bunyan's, said he gives seating
preference at the bar to those who are
old enough to drink alcohol. However,
he said, he allows people under 21 at the
bar "unless they get out of hand."

"abortiord9
Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
Confidential Counseling
Complete Birth Control Clinic
1Medicaid " Blue Cross
(313) 941.1810 Ann Arborand
Downriver area
(313) 559-0590 Southfield area
Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc. m

A

NEIL,

I

Monday4h Frid
NEW 11:00 a to4:0

-t

I

o-_ -0 *Q -- *
51WL
ond' "'
- g

^r rnoro
Straight from the horse s mouth
Joan Peters of Putnam Valley, N.Y., watches as her horse, Sue, makes a
withdrawAi from the drive-up window at Chemical's Bank. Instead of receiv-
ing money though, Sue withdrew the.apple that the bank personnel always
have ready for her.

I
i
i

Carter stops Iranian oil,
PLO negotiators withdraw

ip
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bri
svl

(Continued from Page 1)
tial nomination.
U.S. officials said earlier that it still
was impossible to predict when Iranian
students holding the U.S, Embassy
might release the captives. State
Department spokesman Hodding Car-
ter said he had no "expectations on this
at all, so far as tomorrow, the next day
or whenever."
All efforts to negotiate the release of
the hostages have ended in failure. The
Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO), which had taken the lead in the
effort to negotiate with the Iranians
holding the embassy, gave up its efforts
on Monday.
PRESIDENT CARTER'S personal
emissary, Ramsey Clark, was not
allowed into the country last we .k.
Diplomats from other countries who
have attempted to intercede have been
rebuffed by the Iranians.
However, State Department

spokesman Carter said diplomatic ef-
forts to free the hostages are con-
tinuing.
Privately, State Department officials
said the Iranians, particularly
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the
Iranian revolutionary leader;seem im-
pervious to world opinion.

MASTERS AND DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREES
IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Financial aid is available for Engi-
neering and Science Majorsfor
graduate study in Nuclear Engineer-
ing, Fusion, and Health Paysics.
Graduate Research and Teaching
Assistantship stipends range from
$5800 to $10,200 per year plus out-
of-state tuition waiver.
President's Fellowships for outstand-
ing applicants provide a stipend of
$5000 per year plus full tuition waiver.
For information write: Director,
School of Nuclear Engineering.
Georgia institute of Technology,
Atlanta, Georgia 30334.

Also New Sirloin Strip Lunch
Includes All-You-Can-Eat Salad
Bar and warm roll with butter... $2.89

HAMBURGER
plus SALAD BAR
1/4 pound* of 100% pure beef.
Plus All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar
$1.99 *Pre-cooked weight.

I,

3354 East Washtenaw Ave.
(Across from Arborland
Shopping Center)
On West Stadium Blvd.
(Just North of Intersection
of Stadium and Liberty)

SUPER
SALAD
A super idea for calorie
counters! Help yourself
to as much as you can eat.
$1.99

At Participating Steakhouses
Ponderosa is open from 11:00 am daily

I 1

ORK
LED
UP?

L'

N

fake
a
eak!

On the average, Americans watch
television for 6 hours and 10 minutes a
day, with older women spending the
most time before the set: 8 hours and 4
minutes.
The word's out on campus,..,.
If you want to be in the know, you should
be reading The Daily
.. the latest in news, sports, les affaires
academiques, and entertainment...
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription today

scribe

a.
R

.-
(
(
i

'I

- ~
(gungft6'
Gung Ho, adjective.
Enthusiastic. Energetic.
Willing to help. From an
old Chinese phrase, "work
together." Describes very
old peasant farmers and
very new students. Meijer
is gung ho about college,
too. Meijer Thrifty Acres
is perfect for college stu-
dents; new and old. We
k have the selection of the
name brands you want,
priced to save you money.
Maybe enough for chow
mein and won ton for two.
And we have Meijer
people, gungho. Always
willing to help.
t\
S

...e. /

INSTANT
CASH!
WE'RE PAYING
$1-$2 PER DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS
IN GOOD SHAPE.

THE JNIVERSI'T Announces The 1979-80-
(f WMI(I1 S
Season Subscriptions e
ON SALE NOW! a
PTP Ticket Office- S
The Michigan League n
Mona=Fri. 10-1 and 2-5 pm n
at Power Center Phon: 764-0450
Chrdistma Dance Concert
Featuring; Britten's "CEREMONY OF CAROLS"
Stravinsky's "RENARD"
December 7-9 Fr&Sat at 8pm-Sun. at 3pm

r

s
Featured: MEMBERS OF THE ANN ARBOR CANTAT A SINGERS

I

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