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November 06, 1979 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-06

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Page 6-Tuesday, November 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily

POETRY READINGS by
DIANE WAKOSKI-Nov. 7
HERB SCOTT-Nov. 8
ROBERT HASS-Nov. 9
Open To The Public-FREE
8:00 p.m. PENDLETON ROOM,
MICHIGAN UNION

STATE DEATH TOLL INCREASES DESPITE NEW DRINKING AGE
18-20 year old tra ic deaths up

POETRY -READING
with
Judy Kerman, Margaret Condon
and Bronwyn Mills
reading from their works
TUESDAY, Nov. 6-7:30 P.M.
GUILD HOUSE-802.Monroe
WOMEN'S LIFE CYCLE
AND PUBLIC POLICY
Wednesday, Nov. 7: 9:30 am to 5:15 pm
Thursday, Nov. 8: 9:30 am to noon
RACKHAM
New research on work-education-family patterns
Research into action: meshing new knowledge with public
policy

LANSING (UPI) - The new drinking
age apparently has not cut the in-
volvement of tippling 18- to 20-year-old
in fatal accidents, but there is little
favor for lowering it at this time, a
study backed by bar interests indicated
yesterday.
The study - conducted by Publicom,
Inc. - cites state police statistics
showing 69 drinking drivers between
the ages of 18 and 20 were involved in
fatal accidents in the first six months of
this year, compared with 65 for the-
same period last year.
THE NEW drinking age law took ef-
fect last December.
The rise, which the firm concedes
may not be statistically significant,
contrasts with much-publicized earlier
findings that the number of drinking
drivers between 18 and 20 involved in
all accidents decreased about 25 per

cent.
While claiming the figures raised
questions about a key rationale for the
higher drinking age, Rick Cole of
Publicom said the staff report indicates
bar owners and others should take a
wait-and-see attitude before commit-
ting large sums to any campaign to
lower the drinking age.
"IT DOESN'T look like there's an
awful lot of enthusiasm out there for
changing the drinking age," he said.
A variety of organizations, including
Michigan Licensed Beverage
Association and the bowling proprietors
and individual bar and restaurants
owners, picked up the $5,000 to $6,000
tab on the study.
The study was to assess the impact of
the voter-approved law raising the
legal drinking age to 21 and was over-
seen by a special committee which in-

cluded State Board of Education mem-
ber Barbara Dumouchelle and East
Lansing City Councilman Larry Owen.
PUBLICOM HAS presented a staff
report to the committee but that panel
has yet to issue formal findings.
Cole said the increased involvement
of young drinkers in fatal accidents is
"not statistically significant . . . except
that it does indicate clearly that this
change in the drinking age did not
reduce deaths in that category as
promoters of the proposal had
suggested would happen."
Cole said the conflict between
statistics on fatals and those for all ac-
cidents may reflect the reluctance of
young drivers to admit they were
drinking illegally. }
LT. JACK WARDER of the state
police discounted this explanation,

h6wever. He said figures covering all
accidents tell more than those that
merely look at fatalities.
Cole said the Publicom survey
covered a wide range of persons affec-
ted by the new drinking law including.
bar owners, park officials and high
school principals.
"It doesn't appear to be impacting
too heavily on anybody," he said.
While young people are organizing on
some campuses to push for a lower
drinking ag , their chances for success
are uncertain, Cole said.
He said the staff findings suggest in-
terests behind the students' campaign
should "sit back and see just how much
support actually develops out there
before they commit massive amounts
of money to changing the drinking age
and reversing this questionable con
stitutional action."

Pope discusses Vatican financial woes

Conference Session Free
Center for Continuing Education of Women

Open to public
Tel. 764-6555

VATICAN CITY (Reuter) - Pope
John Paul II inaugurated an un-
precedented four-day private meeting
of 120 cardinals last night to discuss the
Vatican's financial problems and the
role of the church in modern society.
The meeting, in a small, modernistic
conference room with black patent
leather chairs, was in sharp contrast to
the last time the cardinals met - to
elect the Pope in the historic Sistine
Chapel beneath Michelangelo's fresco.
THE PONTIFF, in keeping with
church tradition, addressed the car-
dinals in Latin. Reporters were asked
to leave after being allowed to attend
the opening few minutes of his speech,
but the text was released to the press

later.
On the subject of Vatican finances,
Pope John Paul said the cardinals had
"the right and duty to have an exact
knowledge of the present state of the
matter."
He also urged his cardinals to place
the plight of those suffering for their
faith "at the center of everybody's at-
tention." Although he did not elaborate,
he apparently was referring to restric-
tions on religious liberty in Eastern
Europe.
"IT IS NECESSARY to have an ex-
change of opinion about those suffering
from poverty and those suffering for
their faith.
"These latter must feel in a special

way that they are not abandoned in
their sufferings, that the whole church
remembers them and that they are at
the center of everybody's attention and
not neglected," he said.
John Paul stressed that the theme of
his pontificate was the carrying out of
the reforms of the Second Vatican
Council of 1962-65 while avoiding ex-
tremes of conservatism or liberalism.
WITH THIS statement, the pope ap-
peared to be adopting a moderate ap-
proach and answering some criticisms
that he took a hard line in reaffirming
strict church doctrine during his recent
American tour.
After the pope's speech, Cardinal
Agostino Casaroli, his secretary of

state, addressed the gathering on the
activities of the Curia.
In today's meetings, the cardinals
will hear reports on the state of Vatican
finances by two top administrators,
Cardinal Egidio Vagnozzi and Cardinal
Guiseppe Caprio.
Cardinal Vagnozzi is president of the
VAtican's department which oversees
the budget, and Cardinal Caprio heads,
the administration of the Patrimony of
the Holy See (APSA), which pays the
Curia out of profits on Vatican invest-
ments.
The two men were expected to ex--t
plain APSA's reported deficit of about
12 million dollars a year, covered by,
payments from the pope's private fund.-

M

PRES.

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EYES ONLY!

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Salary disclosure irks faculty group

(Continued from Page 1)
Elving conceded that a discussion of
the administrators' insensitivity to
faculty desires did occur, but added,
"we reached no conclusion because
nobody is sure what the faculty feelings
are."
IF CESF MEMBERS feel the
measure is not an invasion of privacy,
they will then consider in what form the
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salary information should be released,
Elving said.
According to Gordon, some
professors present at the CESF
meeting favored releasing only the
bare miniumum-a professor's name
and the amount he or she receives as
salary from the general fund. Gordon
said these faculty members believed
disclosing only this information would
minimize the invasion of privacy.
Other professors, Gordon said, felt
that if disclosure is necessary, all

possible information, including length
of service and tenure standing, must be
released to explain the sizeable dif-
ferences in professors' salaries. -
IF ONLY FIGURES representing the
salary paid out of the general fund are
released, a typical medical school
professor's salary might appear as
$13,000, said Olivia Birdsall, executive
secretary of SACUA. In reality, Bir-
dsall contended, the professor could be
earning $75,000.

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Birdsall and Gordon asserted yester-
day that releasing figures which are not
representative of a professor's actual
salary-the wages he receives from the
general fund and the salary he receives
rom other sources-would create a
"credibility crisis." "The suspicion will
be so great, they (the public) will think
all the salaries being released are
fake," Gordon said yesterday.
The salaries paid to professors from
the general fund in most departments
and schools, Birdsall contends,
represent a greater percentage of
professors' salary than they do in the
medical school.
CESF IS HOLDING another meeting
Friday, Gordon said, to discuss the
possible methods of salary disclosure.
Some members of SACUA, however,
are concerned about CESF's eagerness
to resolve the issue.
"I am not happy that CESF purports
to be the authority," said Richard Cor=
pron, -professor in the Dental School 2
and chairman of SACUA. "We (SACUA)
are the elected body. We speak for the
faculty."
CESF is "a creature of SACUA,"
Elving said. Its members are appointed
by SACUA but it has more autonomy
than any other SACUA committee,
Gordon asserted. In addition, Gordon,
said that CESF decisions carry con-
siderable weight and are respected by
the Regents and University ad-a.
ministrators.
AFTER HEARING Gordon's report
of the CESF meeting, SACUA went into
closed session to determine their op-
tions in the disclosure issue. They were:
joined by Charles Allmand, assistant to
the vice president for academic affairs,
who also spoke at the CESF meeting.
Members of SACUA concluded that it
is "probably useless to continue to op-
pose the law," Corporon said. He will
present :SACUA's ideas at today's:
meeting of the University executive of-
ficers.
Corpron said the question of seeking
independent legal counsel has not been
completely resolved, but "there is
always the outside possibiity that a
group of faculty members will take it to
court on the invasion of privacy issue.
Meetings will be held across campus
on Wednesday and Thursday for faculty
members and staff who wish to voice
their concerns on salary disclosure.
I. x

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