100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 06, 1979 - Image 96

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page E-6-Thursday, September 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Detroit ofers cosmopolitan alternative

By ALAN FANGER
While many University students are
turned off by Detroit's image, behind
the stigma lies a haven for those
desiring a taste of "bigcity life."
Only 45 minutes away by car, the
Motor City adequately fills the social
and cultural void left open by a smaller
town like Ann Arbor.
One popular diversion offered in the
automobile mecca is Greektown. Just
east of downtown, this ethnically-rich
community is laden with Greek
restaurants and bakeries serving sum-
ptious delights. Many of the restaurants
and bars feature nightly entertainment
with bouzouki bands and lively dancers.
TRIPS TO THE Renaissance Center
are becoming commonplace among
University students. Four identical of-
fice towers enclose the 73-story Detroit

Top-line groups such as Boston,
Foreigner, Kansas, and Journey
usually pop into town once or twice
during the school year, performing at
either Cobo Arena or the Masonic Tem-
ple.
Dance patrons can take advantage of
the Music Hall recital series, which in
recent years has featured the Martha
Graham and Alvin Ailey Dance Com-
panies. The series usually lasts from
October through April.
Another of 'Detroit's cultural
strength is in its theatrical offerings,
which range from Broadway musicals
to one-act dinner theater comedies.
THE FISHER Theater is the focal
point for the latest in both musical and
non-musical productions. Last season's
schedule included Annie, A Chorus
Line, and On the Twentieth Century.

11

I

Although Ann Arbor has much to offer for a town its size,
nearby Detroit can help satisfy student appetites in. areas
such as professional sports and concerts.

Plaza Hotel, which contains a multitude
of restaurants and cocktail lounges.
The Summit, a rotating restaurant-
bar located on the top floor, is the
creme-de-la-creme of Detroit night-
spots. Although the prices are steep and
the crowds often overflowing, the
breathtaking view is enough to take
one's mind off its negative aspects.
But if you're afraid to ride up the
glass elevators, several smaller eating
establishments dot the main floor. La
Rotisserie is one such eaterie. Its
highly-priced French cuisine has been
widely acclaimed throughout the city
since its opening two years ago.
BUT DETROIT doesn't only offer
delicious dining. The city can also tickle
the most specific melodic fancy,
whether your tastes are geared to disco
or Debussy.
The Detroit Symphony Orchesta, one
of the nation's most respected ensem-
bles, performs throughout the year at
Orchestra Hall. The group also spon-
sors a "Brunch with Bach," series in
the Kresge Court of the Art Institute.
Local jazz buffs can often find their
favorite artists playing at intimate
nightclubs in the midtown area. The
two most popular establishments,
Baker's Keyboard Lounge and Watts
Club Mozambique consistently host
famous mainstream and progressive
jazz musicians.
AND IF THE Office of Major Events
isn't satisfying your rock and roll fan-
tasies, an array of Detroit-based
promoters bring in the hottest acts.

Tickets are expensive and in hil
-demand, thus early reservations a
advised.
On a smaller scale, Wayne Sta
University's Hilberry and Bonstel
Theatres present several shows ea(
year, while the Machus and Somers
dinner theatres serve up light
dramatic fare. The Detroit Repertot
Theatre and Meadowbrook Theat
round out the broad spectrum of stat
offerings.
DETROIT ALSO boasts a variety
museums. Two lesser-know
establishments, the Detroit Historic
Museum and the Detroit Science Ce
ter, are located in the Cultural Cent
near Wayne State University. The la
ter is built in the mold of many moder
science institutions, providing sever
exhibits that can be controlled by th
observer.
There is also The Detroit Art I
stitute, which receives hordes c
visitors during special exhibits, but
rarely crowded most of the time. Th
museum constantly updates its colle
tion to keep up with contemporary a
tistic trends.
For a firsthand look at history, Dea
born's Greenfield Village all but pu
you back in time. Few Detroit-ar
residents have missed out on taking th
trip through the mini-city, in whic
many historic buildings have bee
reconstructed. While the Village close
for part of the winter, the Henry For
Historial Museum, with its authenti
exhibits of antique cars and appliance:
remains open throughout the year.

gh
re
te
le
ch
et
er
ry
re
ge
of
vn
al
m-
er
At-
rn
al
he
n-
of
c-
r-

Daily Photo by MAUREEN O'MALLEY
DETROIT'S RENAISSANCE CENTER has become the dominating figure in the Motor City skyline. The 73-story complex
is one of the many attractions which draw University students from the college-tainted atmosphere of Ann Arbor.
GROWERS DOUBLE AS SELLERS:
Farmer 's Market: a rural touch

By JOHN GOYER

DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
WINE and CHAMPAGNE
One of the Finest Selections
LIQUOR BEER * GROCERIES
Specializing in MEDITERRANEAN FOODS
" CHEESES * STRUDEL " DOUGH."
GREEK IMPORTS e PASTRIES

r- The people who buy food at 315 N.
ts Fifth Ave. don't pile all their purchases
re in shopping carts. Nor is the produce
is they get there surrounded by tightly-
h wrapped plastic. x
m But these aren't the only differences
es noticed when comparing Ann Arbor's
d Farmers Market with more conven-
ic tional produce sources.
s, At the market, you can buy tomatoes,
green beans, squash, and "well, just
about any vegetable you can think of,
and any fruit that can be grown
locally,"'said manager Grace Bennett.
ONE OF THE rules of the market,
Bennett said, is that all produce must
be grown by the seller; there are no
middlepersons.
Prices at the market are comparable
to prices at the supermarket, Bennett
said, but unlike many farmers'
markets, the prices remain the same
throughout the day.
THE BUSIEST time of day at the
market is about 10 a.m., Bennett said.
"If you want a choice of everything, you
definitely have to be here before 11
a.m.," she added. But she said most of
the students she sees at the market
don't show up until after 11 a.m. Even
though the selection dwindles later in
the day, customers still find benefits
unavailable elsewhere.
"There isn't any packaging, and
that means a lot to me. I dislike that at
the supermarket," said customer
Katherine Suter.
Is the quality better at the Farmers
Market? "Of course," Suter replied.
"I SELL MORE sweet corn here than
anybody," Karl Neuvirth said. "I might
be bragging a bit," he added with a
smile.

Neuvirth said he has been selling his
produce regularly at the market for the
past 27 years. He said he and his four
children pick three hundred dozen
heads of sweet corn on an average
Friday afternoon in the fall to sell at the
market the next day.
Neuvirth said the farmers at the
market are small producers. He works
as a sheet metal worker during the
week.
The market is about a 20-minute walk
from central campus. If you are not up
for the walk, the Liberty Shuttledecker,
an English-style double decker bus,
serves the market from stops along
South University Street, State Street,
and Liberty Street.

' S

r

,
§j'
R
;,.aN,;

.
.;
s
: :
.,

_, , I

Open 9 AM-1 AM Mon.-Sat.
211 S. 4th Ave.

Sundays & Holidays til Midnite

Ann Arbor

663-0101

F ..-_-.. ..__. _..__._ ._. I_ . _. .

wiCe
I cbeese

fivae

to-Racco

A

7 "

y/r

,

,ail

,/ 4
C -
1~ -
>'.'

An e lo'ls
9 RESTAURANT
FAMOUS FOR OUR
HOME-MADE BREAD
. BEST BREAKFASTS IN TOWN (Try the waffles!)
"SANDWICHES * SALADS * DINNERS * SEAFOOD
" CARRY-OUT SERVICE-668-9538
Corner of Catherine and Glen
__(short walk from Med. Center)

Doily Photo by MAUREEN O'MALLEY ,
A YOUNG BUSINESSMAN makes a sale at the Farmer's Market, where grower
sell produce that is usually fresh from the farm or garden.

'

"
70
r-
.D
0
3
OA

LESSONS

* RENTALS

0 SALES

" EXPERT REPAIR

Herb David Guitar Studio

We at [Uillae

CorneGRz

209 S. State Street
Ann Arbor (Upstairs)
4J (4

665-8001

m
4
-4
O
70
0
z
NI
O

You Ought To Be
On Stage!

or behind it.
or inside it... .

scippL y oaar customer-s
With the LittLce tbis

"
-
C

Lessons ni
Repairs

or in front of it, in the orchestra, or outside the front door
selling tickets.
Whatever your talent is, whether you sing, dance, sew, act, hammer
nails, focus lights, keep accuirate accouints or throw fantastic parties. Ann

(k~i~hmake [i-Ce

rriorie

I'

I

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan